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190

Positional parameters $1,$2,$3… and their corresponding array representation, count and IFS expansion $@, $#, and $*. $- current options set for the shell. $$ pid of the current shell (not subshell) $_ most recent parameter (or the abs path of the command to start the current shell immediately after startup) $IFS the (input) field separator $? most recent ...


38

It's a common reference to a jQuery wrapped object. It makes reading the code easier to know which variables are jQuery wrapped. //Item has been "cached" for later use in the script as a jQuery object. var $item = $(this);


28

When you see: (function() { // all JS code here })(); It is knows as self-invoking anonymous function. The function executes as soon as it is parsed because of the addition of () at the end (that's how you run js functions). Notice that extra outer braces are just convention, you could also write it up like: function() { // all JS code here }(); ...


21

for me a common practice is this: if a variable is private i use an underscore like this: (function(){ var _foo = "bar"; })() if its public ill use no underscore: var foo = "bar" and if its a jQuery selector ill use the $: var $foo = $('bar'); //then you can access it like this $foo.attr('id') its just coding convention and it allows you to ...


20

$ is infix "application". It's defined as ($) :: (a -> b) -> (a -> b) f $ x = f x -- or ($) f x = f x -- or ($) = id It's useful for avoiding extra parentheses: f (g x) == f $ g x. A particularly useful location for it is for a "trailing lambda body" like forM_ [1..10] $ \i -> do l <- readLine replicateM_ i $ print l compared to ...


19

Syntactically, the dollar sign itself means nothing -- to the interpreter, it's just another character, like _ or q. But a lot of people using jQuery and other similar frameworks will prefix variables that contain a jQuery object with a $ so that they are easily identified, and thus not mixed up with things like integers or strings. You could just as easily ...


18

Whatever is last is the final definition of $ That is why in (for example) jQuery there is noConflict() which lets you use a different variable than $ for jQuery


16

Its a way of mapping jQuery to the $ in a way so that not all code in a page will see it. Maybe you have an existing script that uses jQuery that you like to reuse but you also use prototype that also uses $ in the same page. By wrapping any jQuery using code in that construct you redefine $ to jQuery for the contained part without coming into conflict ...


16

Why not try it? function $ () { return false; } function $ () { return document.getElementById('body'); } function $ () { alert('I wrote this'); } $(); // alerts "I wrote this" The later definition overwrites the existing one. This is why it's generally good practice to check whether a function already exists before defining it. e.g. if (typeof $ !== ...


15

In Haskell you can use flip to change arguments' order of any binary function or operator: ghci> let (|>) = flip ($) ghci> 3 |> (+4) |> (*6) 42


15

I do not know, whether there is an standart operator, but what prevents you from writing your own? This works in ghci: Prelude> let a $> b = b a Prelude> 1 $> (+2) 3 Prelude> sum [1, 2] $> (+2) 5 Prelude> map (+2) [1, 2] $> map (+3) [6,7] UPDATE: searching on hoogle for a -> (a -> b) -> b (it is the type of this operator) ...


15

$_ last argument of last command $# number of arguments passed to current script $* / $@ list of arguments passed to script as string / delimited list off the top of my head. Google for bash special variables.


14

>>> [word for word in mystring.split() if word.startswith('$')] ['$string', '$example']


14

When you write a function like: (function (foo, bar) { return foo.getElementById(bar); })(document, "myElement") then the function is immediately called with arguments document and "myElement" for parameters foo and bar. Therefore, inside the function, foo.getElementById(bar) is equivalent to document.getElementById("myElement"). Similarly, in your ...


14

This has to do with parsing. In Haskell you can write (op arg) where op is an infix operator. This is not the same as ((op) arg). And you can write (arg op) as well! For example: GHCi, version 7.0.3: http://www.haskell.org/ghc/ :? for help Prelude> :t (+ 4) (+ 4) :: Num a => a -> a Prelude> :t (4 +) (4 +) :: Num a => a -> a That is, (+ ...


13

If make "secondary expansion" is enabled, $$$$ is required in order to generate a single $ in the actual output. $ is normally used to expand variables, call make functions, etc. $$ with secondary expansion enabled does something else, but otherwise it generates an actual $ in the output. The shell that make uses to execute command-lines on Unix-like ...


13

It is one of the Chrome Developer Tools functions (so not available from the page). You can see documentation for it on the Console page (although that just says it implements the Firebug console commands) It gets an element by its id.


12

A dollar sign ($) is actually an alias for jQuery function. And according to the documentation, if you pass a callback as an argument to this function, it will be executed when the DOM is ready. When it comes to the second part of your question (about why the second part of the code is not working): just check the selectors. For me it is working perfectly ...


11

Nothing. People tend to use the $x syntax because it's easier to remember you're dealing with a jquery object rather than an element or an id. In general I tend to use something similar to: var $x = $(selector) //$x holds reference to a jquery object var elX = document.getElementById(id); // elX hold ref to an element node var xId = $(selector).attr('id'); ...


11

The problem with $$ in PHP is that you create unknown variable names, that may override variable names you already use. It is a source for subtle programming errors, and should generally not be used.


10

event.target is a reference to the DOM node. $(event.target) is a jQuery object that wraps the DOM node, which lets you use jQuery's magic to query manipulate the DOM. In other words, you can do this: $(event.target).addClass('myClass'); but you can't do this: event.tagert.addClass('myClass');


10

This combinator is defined (tongue in cheek) in the data-aviary package: Prelude Data.Aviary.BirdsInter> 1 `thrush` (+2) Loading package data-aviary-0.2.3 ... linking ... done. 3 Although actually using that package is a rather silly thing to do, reading the source is fun, and reveals that this combinator is formed via the magic incantation of flip id ...


10

Your question is really about what is called operator sections. With any operator in Haskell (I will use + as an example) you can write something like (+ arg) or (arg +). These are just shorthand syntax for the anonymous functions (\x -> x + arg) and (\x -> arg + x), respectively. So, the ($ [1..5]) syntax just means (\x -> x $ [1..5]) which is the ...


9

There are two reasons to pass jQuery into a closure in this way. By far the most significant one is that it makes your code work on pages which use jQuery's "no conflict" mode, which allows the use of jQuery alongside other libraries which want control over the $ global. For this reason, the (function($) { ... })(jQuery) technique is strongly recommended ...


9

This is a precedence issue. You have two infix operators here, : and $. As an infix operator, : has higher precedence than $, so it binds more tightly. You can ask about precedence in ghci >> :i : data [] a = ... | a : [a] -- Defined in `GHC.Types` infixr 5 : >> :i $ ($) :: (a -> b) -> a -> b infixr 0 $ The infixr means that ...


9

It's not definitively legal, but your implementation is allowed to accept it. Consider: [C++11: 2.5/1]: Each preprocessing token that is converted to a token (2.7) shall have the lexical form of a keyword, an identifier, a literal, an operator, or a punctuator. Here, your $ is obviously not a keyword, operator or punctuator (as these are enumerated in ...


8

Having a symbol to denote variables makes string interpolation simple and clear. Shell, Perl and PHP grew out of the need for quick and easy string manipulation, including interpolation, so I imagine using a variable prefix seemed like a good idea. IE: $var = 'val'; $strVar = "The var is $var"; Compare to: var = 'val' strVal = 'The var is %s' %(var)


8

As of now, Python does not implement $ in its syntax. So, it has nothing to do with Python. Instead, what you are seeing is the terminal prompt of a Unix-based system (Mac, Linux, etc.)


7

The dollar sign is not a standard Javascript function, but is part of a third party library. There are two well-known libraries which use the dollar sign in this way. The older one is called Prototype, but the one which is currently in vogue, and most likely to be the one you've seen in use is JQuery. Both these libraries would be used by adding a ...



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