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3

You can write a simple recursive function which iterates all text nodes: function iterateTextNodes(root, callback) { for(var i=0; i<root.childNodes.length; ++i) { var child = root.childNodes[i]; if(child.nodeType === 1) { // element node iterateTextNodes(child, callback); // recursive call } else if(child.nodeType ...


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Generalizing Fausto's answer, var range = document.getElementById('range'), fake = document.getElementById('fake-range'), parent = fake.parentElement; function renderFake() { var available = parent.clientWidth - fake.offsetWidth, ratio = (range.value - range.min) / (range.max - range.min); fake.style.left = ratio * available + ...


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Adding this CSS should do what you want: a.disabled { pointer-events: none; cursor: not-allowed; } This should fix the issue mentioned by @MichelLiu in the comments: <a href="#" [class.disabled]="isDisabled(link)" (keydown.enter)="isDisabled(link) ? false : true">{{ link.name }}</a> Another approach <a ...


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The challenge with bbc web site, that it have little bit non standard approach toward their url. Below goes one of the samples of their a href: <A tabIndex=-1 aria-hidden=true class=block-link__overlay-link href="http://www.bbc.com/news/world-africa-36132482" rev=hero5|overlay>Barbie challenges the 'white saviour complex' </A> so, you need to ...


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You can only have one ng-app per the Angular specs. However, your goal, if I understand it correctly can be achieved via a ngModule. You can read more about it in this blog post http://www.simplygoodcode.com/2014/04/angularjs-getting-around-ngapp-limitations-with-ngmodule/


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Here is a solution using simple JS... http://codepen.io/anon/pen/GZwxzx <input id="range" onchange="updateFakeRange(this.value);" type="range" min="0" max="196" value="0"> <div class="wrap"> <span id="fake-range"></span> </div> Notice the onchange="updateFakeRange(this.value);" on the input. var inputRange = ...


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The whole purpose of this function is to avoid having to put an if statement in all the places where you call the function. So if you have lots of places that look like: if (something) { foo.insertBefore(bar, foo.childNodes[0])); } else { foo.appendChild(bar); } You can simplify all of them to: insert(foo, bar, something); With your two ...


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I modified your code a little. Now you can select a date hitting the Enter key: var time = webix.ui({ view:"datepicker", align: "right", label: 'Select Date', labelWidth:100, width:350, type:"time", stringResult:true }); document.addEventListener("keydown", keyDownTextField, false); function keyDownTextField(e) { var keyCode = ...


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I've created a similar solution for my project using DOM. Works good enough for me, but actually, it's a temporary hack (unless I can find something better). Check it out: time.getPopup().attachEvent("onhide", function(){ var timeArr = document.getElementsByClassName("webix_cal_block webix_selected"); if (timeArr.length == 2){ var hour = ...


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Based on your code, I would look at using datepicker() directly instead of using ui. its part of the jquery UI set. I have linked directly to the datepicker site. var time = webix.datepicker(); And on the jquery page there is a list of time picker plugins that may also help fill the void Timepicker plugins


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Specifying pointer-events: none in CSS disables mouse input but doesn't disable keyboard input. For example, the user can still tab to the link and "click" it by pressing the Enter key or (in Windows) the ≣ Menu key. Even if you disabled specific keystrokes by intercepting the keydown event, this approach would likely confuse users relying on assistive ...



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