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5

getElementsByTagName returns an array like object instead of a single element. So [0] selects the first element of the array. So its like var i,n; var alldivs = document.getElementsByTagName( 'div' ); //use array length to get number of matched elements console.log("there are "+alldivs.length+" divs on the page"); //loop through each element in array ...


5

It is pretty much never a good thing to get the .innerHTML property from an object and then try to compare it to some exact string. This is because the only contract the browser has is to return to you equivalent HTML, not necessarily the exact same HTML. This may not be a problem if there are no nested DOM elements in what you are requesting, but can ...


5

While it's true that some of the properties on element instances are direct reflections of attributes (the rel property directly reflects the rel attribute on link elements, for instance, and className directly reflects the class attribute), but this isn't always the case. The value property is not a direct reflection of the value attribute. It gets its ...


4

That's because when removing the div, it is no longer in the DOM, so the label is not a sibling anymore. remove the label first, then the div: $(".remove").live('click', function() { $(this).parent().prev('label.prfx-row-title').remove(); $(this).parent().remove(); }); Or better : $(".remove").live('click', function() { ...


4

You can't remove prev() from something that is no longer there... so the easiest fix is just to rearrange the order... $(".remove").live('click', function () { $(this).parent().prev('label.prfx-row-title').remove(); $(this).parent().remove(); }); Also, if possible you might want to update the version of jquery you are using and use on() instead of ...


4

This looks like the same rendering issue mentioned here: Bottom of custom font cut off in Opera and webkit According to http://stackoverflow.com/a/8617238/4097933 the css file for your fonts chrome will load the EOT and ignore the following woff,ttf and svg fonts. @font-face{ font-family:"Linotype Didot eText W01"; ...


4

You should use delegation here, as your first item won't have the click event handler attached to it on the first load (its class - page_menu_selected - is different from the one used in the jQuery selector - page_menu_unselected). Using delegation you'll guarantee any future elements added to the DOM that fits in the jQuery selector will be selected the ...


4

I don't see any issue with figure:first-child selector. It would select the <figure> element only if it is the first child of its parent. While :first-child represents any element which is the first child in the children tree of the parent, the figure part would limit the selector to match an element only if it is a <figure>.


4

You could use CSS :first-child selector with descendant selector like this: JSFiddle - DEMO div figure:first-child { color:red; } OR: with CSS > child selector (as suggested by @Alohci) DEMO div > figure:first-child { color:red; }


4

Use the first form or a wrapper such as jQuery. The second form, var myObj = myDomObect; Translates to var myObj = window["myDomObect"]; This "works" because of an old, old hack in which ID's were exposed as global window properties (IIRC this was a misfeature from the start) and thus we are still blessed with the behavior 20 years later.. and yes, it ...


4

This is certainly a bug - there's been a very similar one before. It happens because .sort() modifies the original array while it's being rendered and Ractive renders it twice. You can work around this by creating a copy of the array before sorting it using .slice() method: function (arr) { //return arr arr.slice().sort(function (a, b) { ...


4

As I mentioned in the comments, why not check for duplicates earlier? A simple example: var colors = []; $('*').each(function(i, el){ var $element = $(el), color = $element.css('background-color'); if(!~$.inArray(color, colors)) colors.push(color); }); console.log(colors); http://jsfiddle.net/sL9oeywk/


3

It depends. It depends on HTTP request method. If the page was GET the browser may decide to cache it, and not re-request. POST and other HTTP methods are not cached as they may have side effects server side. This is why you even get a warning dialog if you go back to a page that was loaded by a POST request. It depends on caching headers. (See here) Pages ...


3

Chrome doesn't instantaneously apply your DOM changes, until the javascript thread frees up or something causes it to have to render. You can move your code into a callback function that will run after ... well, 0ms, or whenever the JS engine can next run it. var container = document.getElementById("container"); container.style.visibility = "hidden"; ...


3

Move your if statement to the top, just after your input variable is assigned to, and add a return to it to break out of the function: function addText() { var input = ...; if (input == "") { alert("..."); return; } var node ...; ... } Amended JSFiddle demo. When a return statement is called in a function, the ...


3

wrap it up: $(document).ready(function() { var href='abc.html',text='click'; jQuery('<a/>', { href: href, text: text }).wrap("<li>").parent().appendTo('#mySelector'); }) http://codepen.io/anon/pen/Eyqco


3

If you mean children, element instances have childNodes (which includes non-element children like text nodes) and (on most engines) children (which just has child elements). (You clarified you mean descendants.) If you mean descendants, you can use querySelectorAll: var descendants = theElement.querySelectorAll("*"); All modern browsers, and IE8, have ...


3

Create a jQuery object from the span HTML: var s = $("<span class='tag_box' data-title='"+word+"'>"+word+"<a class='remove_tag'>x</a></span>"); $('.tag_boxes').append(s); s.animate({'opacity':1});


3

No this isn't valid. The header element represents a header for the content, however the header element must not be a descendant of the footer element. The footer section of the HTML5 specification states that the footer element is: Flow content, but with no header, footer, or main element descendants. If you paste the below code into W3's HTML ...


3

It might be useful to know why you have both an object and a DOM representation. I assume hash is the single source of truth and the DOM renders the hash accordingly. I would expect the hash lookup to be faster because the DOM can be slow, however this is mostly writing the DOM, not reading the DOM. I made a JS Perf and the results vary drastically based on ...


3

By the time script is executed, document element is not available, because script itself is in the head. Put it after body instead: <html> <head> </head> <body> </body> <script src="/bundle.js"></script> </html> This works.


3

The ES5 spec states that an object that implements [[Call]] must be reported as typeof "function". A small handful of DOM elements (object, embed, not many others) are callable / do implement [[Call]]. This is likely for historical reasons, but the fact remains that you can call them. So Firefox is technically correct in reporting them as functions. You ...


2

It is hard to tell if this a bug of chrome, an error in the font or a bug at all. I tried to recreate the problem here: http://jsfiddle.net/p7wum0bp/1/ As you can see the italic, serif j is not beeing cut off, as in your image. I guess this can depend on font to font. As u said, you don't want to give the element a padding, as the headline beeing ...


2

These variables are not passed automatically to client-side code; as you say, they're available to code in your view templates. Similarly, and variables defined in res.locals (or app.locals, which has the same API) will be available as local variables in any views. If you want to make them available to client side code, you'd have to manually send them as ...


2

These variables are used for rendering the view on the server side only. Obviously some of these values make their way into the HTML of the server side response, but you probably want to look at a module such as sharify if you want to serialize these to JSON, embed into a <script> tag in the HTML, and get access to them in the browser javascript code.


2

Take a look at your last line of code document.getElementsByTagName("INPUT")[3];.setAttribute("onclick", "theOtherFunction()"); There is a ; you don't want there right after the [3]. Hope this helps.


2

There is an interesting event named input: JSFiddle example. Html: <form> <input id="text" name="text" type="text" /> <input type="submit" value="Sumbit" /> </form> Script: $(document).ready(function() { $('#text').on('input', function() { console.log('Changed to ' + this.value); }); });


2

It's exactly what it says - it's a text node. The text within and around elements is represented as text nodes. And sometimes a text node contains just whitespace. This might be due to extra space at the end of a line or indentation, for example. It's good to remember that depending on the parser and platform some whitespace might be deemed "insignificant" ...


2

You need to have a different name when declaring the parameter, since this is a keyword. function addNode(elem){ var x = document.getElementById("files"); var y = x.getElementsByTagName("div"); var clone = y.cloneNode(true); x.appendChild(clone); }; Also, y is a NodeList and you need to access the elements in it by indexes which you ain't ...


2

You are not passing i as a string value, you are passing it as an variable. In modern browsers the element's id are copied to properties of the window object(so you can access then as global variables). So you need to enclose them using quotes to pass i as a string value $('<button onclick="handleJoeDateTime(\'' + i + '\');return ...



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