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39

As the error states, Angular disallows accessing DOM nodes in expressions. CoffeeScript uses an implicit return if none is specified. This means that for example the scope.open function in your code will: return element.dialog('open'); Angular will detect this and throw the error. If you add an explicit return it should solve the issue: scope.open = ...


33

Anyway, this method seems to be quite poorly documented, and In fact, the sources I come across don't even give it a mention [...] Reliance on implicitly-declared global variables aside, the lack of documentation is a great reason not to use it. The apparent promotion of id values into global variables isn't standards compliant (the HTML5 spec for the ...


27

By the time script is executed, document element is not available, because script itself is in the head. While it's a valid solution to keep script in head and render on DOMContentLoaded event, it's even better to put your script at the very bottom of the body and render root component to a div before it: <html> <head> </head> <body> ...


14

Great question. As Einstein probably didn’t say, things should be as simple as possible, and no simpler. the latter approaches have the advantage of keeping the code safe if someone inadvertedly attempts to redefine myDiv in a wider scope (not such a brilliant idea though...), overwrites it with some different value and goes on without noticing the clash ...


14

TL;DR Use prop() over attr() in the majority of cases. A property is the current state of the input element. An attribute is the default value. A property can contain things of different types. An attribute can only contain strings


13

Eeek. You can't iterate over a nodeList or HTMLCollection with for/in and when you do iterate, you need to actually retrieve the value from the list, using the index in your iteration. You should iterate it like this: var list= document.getElementsByClassName("events"); for (var i = 0; i < list.length; i++) { console.log(list[i].id); //second ...


11

dirty checkedness is an example where the difference is observable. To see it, run the following snippet and: click the button. Both checkboxes got checked. uncheck both checkboxes. click the button again. Only the prop checkbox got checked. BANG! $('button').on('click', function() { $('#attr').attr('checked', 'checked') ...


11

I've become fond of using indexOf for this. Because indexOf is on Array.prototype and parent.children is a NodeList, you have to use call(); It's kind of ugly but it's a one liner and uses functions that any javascript dev should be familiar with anyhow. var child = document.getElementById('my_element'); var parent = child.parentNode; // The equivalent of ...


11

I'm a React dev. I'll answer each of your questions: React does not care if DOM is moved around between updates as long as you put it back in componentWillUpdate. True -- React doesn't look at the DOM except when updating, with the exception of event handlers: React event handlers will still work on elements that have been moved. I wouldn't ...


11

If you want to display any error of the page in your div, you may use the global event handler onerror : window.onerror = function(e){ document.getElementById('prompt').innerHTML = e.toString(); } Demonstration If your goal is to intercept all what is written by the browser in the console, not only the errors, I'm not sure it's directly possible as ...


11

First, the right place to mess with rendering are directives. My advice would be to wrap DOM manipulating jQuery plugins by directives like this one. I had the same problem and came up with this snippet. It uses $watch and $evalAsync to ensure your code runs after directives like ng-repeat have been resolved and templates like {{ value }} got rendered. ...


11

None of the above answers worked for me. I did notice that resizing my window did cause a redraw. So this did it for me: $(window).trigger('resize');


10

I finally wanted to know the difference as well, so I dug into the source and found the answer; in most cases there will be no discernible difference, but there are a bunch of edge cases you should be aware of. Both ->nodeValue and ->textContent are identical for the following classes (node types): DOMAttr DOMText DOMElement DOMComment ...


10

There are a few reasons: You don't want your code and your markup that coupled. By using a specific call to access a div, you don't have to worry about the global space being corrupted. Add a library that declares myDiv in global space and you're in a world of pain that will be hard to fix. You can access elements, by ID, that aren't part of the DOM ...


10

2014 answer: there's a native classList.toggle() supported by most browsers. You can also use classlist.js for classList.toggle() in older browsers: var menu = document.querySelector('.menu') // Using a class instead, see note below. menu.classList.toggle('hidden-phone'); As an aside, you shouldn't be using IDs (they leak globals into the JS window ...


9

query() and queryAll() accept a relative selector string, whereas querySelector() and querySelectorAll() do not. A relative selector is basically a selector which may be partial and start with a combinator: var parentNode = document.getElementById('parentNode'); // document.querySelector('#parentNode'); // Find .childNode elements that are children of ...


9

1: Prototype.observe uses Element.addEventListener (see the source code) 2: You can override Element.addEventListener to remember the added listeners (handy property EventListenerList was removed from DOM3 spec proposal). Run this code before any event is attached: (function() { Element.prototype.eventListenerList = {}; ...


9

Yes. DOM stands for document object model and describes the tree strcuture of elements that form the (HTML) document. When the CSS spec talks about a document tree it refers to the same thing. In the sentence you've cited the document says the information, for example whether a link has been visited or not, is not stored in a DOM node. Take a look at ...


9

HTMLInputElement inherits from HTMLElement which, in turn, inherits from Element. If an object inherits from another object, then it will have all the properties of that object. This means that anything which expects to deal with an Element can be given an HTMLInputElement instead (since the HTMLInputElement has all the properties of an Element, but some ...


9

I wrote react-document-title just for that. It provides a declarative way to specify document.title in a single-page app. If you want to get title on server after rendering components to string, call DocumentTitle.rewind(). Features Does not emit DOM, not even a <noscript>; Like a normal React compoment, can use its parent's props and state; Can be ...


9

This solution without timeouts! Real force redraw! For Android and iOS. var forceRedraw = function(element){ var disp = element.style.display; element.style.display = 'none'; var trick = element.offsetHeight; element.style.display = disp; };


8

Using jQuery try this (An Example Here.): var $a = $('<div>') .addClass('box a') .appendTo('#wrapper'); $a.css('opacity'); // added $a.addClass('in'); Using Vanilla javaScript try this: var e = document.createElement('div'); e.className = 'box e'; document.getElementById('wrapper').appendChild(e); window.getComputedStyle(e).opacity; // added ...


8

jQuery's data() method does not set data attributes, it stores the data in an internal object. HTML5 data attributes will be automatically pulled in to jQuery's data object, which means the initial value of the data object reflects whatever is given in the attribute, but changing the value with data() will not update the attribute, only the internal data ...


8

should be document.getElementById("paragraph").innerHTML not innerHtml


8

Just use toggle(): $('#menu').click(function() { $('.undermenu').toggle(); }); Though the reason your if($('.undermenu').css('display','block')) didn't work is because you set the display property of the element(s) to block, rather than getting the display property and testing it, which would be: if ($('.undermenu').css('display') =='block') If you ...


8

It's right there in the docs - Attribute values in selector expressions must follow the rules for W3C CSS selectors; in general, that means anything other than a valid identifier should be surrounded by quotation marks. http://api.jquery.com/category/selectors/attribute-selectors/ In CSS, identifiers (including element names, classes, and IDs in ...


8

You can't use for/in on NodeLists or HTMLCollections. However, you can use some Array.prototype methods, as long as you use .call() them and pass in the NodeList or HTMLCollection as this. So consider the following as an alternative to jfriend00's for loop: var list= document.getElementsByClassName("events"); [].forEach.call(list, function(el) { ...


8

Summary: The FakeRainBrigand's solution has worked quite fine for me for some time until I got new problems. ContentEditables are a pain, and are not really easy to deal with React... This JSFiddle demonstrates the problem. As you can see, when you type some characters and click on Clear, the content is not cleared. This is because we try to reset the ...


7

The Angular guidelines don't say "do not use controllers to manipulate the dom" in the sense that you should never have the dom change as the result of something in a controller - but rather that you should never in a controller directly modifiy the dom. Don't use document.getElementById, don't use $("#element"), etc - never talk TO the dom, let your model ...


7

The reason this is happening is because the for loop is changing the container so when the element is clicked it should alert 2 either way because container is the last container, you can use a closure like this for(var i = 0; i < allContainer.length; i++){ (function(container){ container.onclick = function(e){ ...



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