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14

It sounds like you need to pursue a delegation strategy without falling back to a library. I've posted some sample code in a Fiddle here: http://jsfiddle.net/founddrama/ggMUn/ The gist of it is to use the target on the event object to look for the elements you're interested in, and respond accordingly. Something like: ...


5

I'm going to go with working as intended. jQuery is using the document.readyState for browsers that don't support DOMContentLoaded. document.readyState only equals complete when the page's resources are done loading. https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/DOM/document.readyState There's probably a good reason why they aren't doing it on "interactive", ...


2

Points to note: 1) You paused your carousel on init. This may explain the initial pause. The carousel auto continues to the next slide, showing the subsequent slides after the default delay, which apparently is 5000ms. $('.carousel.paused-by-default').carousel('pause'); 2) The paused carousel, after the initial pause, displays itself using this code: ...


2

There are some traps: The hiddenWindow differs between platforms. It is XUL on Mac, and HTML else. You should use .setAttribute("src", url); to reliably navigate. The following works for me (Mac, Win7): var urls = [ 'http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internet', 'http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IPv4', 'http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Multicast' ]; var ...


2

Your request took 9 milliseconds to complete After that your browser received some data, it converted this into an html object(DOM) and displays this on your screen(DOMLoaded) The action of converting and displaying took your browser 42 milliseconds, which is the gap between response and domLoaded. edit: I didn't manage to find the exact things the browser ...


2

I would highly recommend the Chrome profiler for this task: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OxW1dCjOstE


1

Try this: console.log($(document).data("events").ready); Based on John Resig's post here: http://forum.jquery.com/topic/list-event-listeners Also, check out the listHandlers plugin. If all else fails, you could temporarily edit the core jQuery file: ready: function( fn ) { //create a wrapper function so we can step into the debugger var fn2 ...


1

I would suggest you to do the following : Reduce the size of your images . Combine your css files into one . Combine js files . Gzip css and js files . Compression will drastically improve load time . Minify css and js , removing unwanted space in these files will reduce the size of them. You can take advantage of browser caching by specifying expiry date ...


1

You're getting that error message because your script runs before $ is defined. To fix it, make sure jQuery is loaded before running that script.


1

It sounds like you haven't included the JQuery JS file before attempting to use JQuery. Remember that browsers render the page top to bottom so add the reference to the Jquery JS file to the top of the page.


1

Load image dynamically and then on its onload add it to the background $(document).ready(function(){ var img = new Image(); img.onload = function(){ // image has been loaded $("html.page-name").css("background-image","url('"+image_url+"')"); }; img.src = image_url; })


1

If you want to run something after all the "texts" as you call it are loaded but before other js, you need to run all your js at the very bottom of the page (that is, btw, proposed best practice) and run anything you need ot be ran first at the very top... Note that js is highly concurrent - meaning that lots of stuff is happening simultaneously, so I ...


1

The behavior of the following techniques make it safe to parse DOM ... Using window load or DomContentLoaded event Declare or inject your script at the bottom of the page Place "async" attribute on your script tag or doing this: <script> setTimeout(function(){ // script declared inside here will execute after the DOM is parsed },0); ...


1

...JavaScript in the HEAD ... dynamically inserts an asynchronously loading script tag before the last script on the page... I'm assuming the loader script is inline, meaning that the highlighted bit actually refers to the "current" script element i.e. the loader. This happens since only the html preceding the loader script tag has been parsed and ...


1

The JavaScript is loaded on onload (inside jsfiddle), so onload won't fire, because it already fired. Switch onload to no wrap - in <head>.


1

It's most likely to do with the browser prefetch I suspect. If there is a src on the image tag then it'll take load time regardless. Any of the js solutions I've seen for responsive images have empty/dummy src tags and then the appropriate img src gets swapped in. I quite like this uncomment technique too as a js option. If the original tag is commented ...


1

When the HTML parser comes across any script elements, It assumes that document.write may be present in the script and it blocks HTML loading. That's why it's recommended to load all scripts at the bottom of the page to ensure page loads fast. By the statement, Angular initializes automatically upon DOMContentLoaded event, it means that angular bootstraps ...


1

If you keep your Javascript code in a single file it only has to be loaded once (and perhaps even compiled once, see this), when a user requests their first page of your website. Then the browser will use a cached copy unless you disallow caching (bad configuration of your web server can do that). When you do something like (JQuery): ...


1

Depends on how you add new elements. If you add using createElement, you can try this: var btn = document.createElement("button"); btn.addEventListener('click', masterEventHandler, false); document.body.appendChild(btn); Then you can use masterEventHandler() to handle all clicks.



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