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43

I found a solution after wondering why IE doesn't suffer from this problem. Firefox and Chrome/Safari triggers the DOMContentLoaded event before font-face is applied, thus causing the problem. The solution is to not listen for DOMContentLoaded but instead go oldschool and listen to onreadystatechange and wait until the document.readyState === 'complete' ...


26

A little explanation first: The point with inline JavaScript is to include it as soon as possible. However, that "possible" is dependent on the DOM nodes that that script requires being declared. For example, if you have some navigation menu that requires JavaScript, you would include the script immediately after the menu is defined in the HTML. <ul ...


24

This is the way jQuery wraps the functions you're looking for - the snippet does not need jQuery, and is cross-browser compatible. I've replaced all calls to jQuery.ready() with yourcallback - which you need to define. What goes on in here: first, the function DOMContentLoaded is defined, which will be used when the DOMContentLoaded event fires - it ...


21

The document.readyState property can be used to check if the document is ready: if(document.readyState === "complete") { //Already loaded! } else { //Add onload or DOMContentLoaded event listeners here: for example, window.addEventListener("onload", function () {/* your code here */}, false); //or //document.addEventListener("DOMContentLoaded", ...


14

You should execute search when your Controller is initialized. i.e. function Controller($scope, $http) { $scope.search = function(){...}; $scope.search(); } When Angular's Dependency Injection constructs your controller then you know that the your view is compiled, linked, and ready for initialization code.


12

Wow, that is a lof of questions for one answer :) Now, the dollar sign is shorthand for jQuery, which calls the jQuery library, so we can make jQuery statements and calls, correct? Yes, $ and jQuery refer to the same object. Taken from jQuery's source: // Expose jQuery to the global object window.jQuery = window.$ = jQuery; window is the global ...


10

Actually, in simplified version, the error is much easier to spot. The problem lies in double usage of module. First time at HTML (leftover from the time before RequireJS): <html ng-app="myApp"> And the second time at manual bootstrap after RequireJS finished loading the document: angular.bootstrap(document, ['myApp']); So this is the correct ...


9

DOM ready means that all the HTML has been received and parsed by the browser into the DOM tree which can now be manipulated. It occurs before the page has been fully rendered (as external resources may have not yet fully downloaded - including images, CSS, JavaScript and any other linked resources).


9

Smallest DOMReady code, ever. <html> <head> <script> var ready = function (f) { (/complete|loaded|interactive/.test(document.readyState)) ? f() : setTimeout(ready, 9, f); }; </script> </head> <body> <script> ready(function () { alert('DOM ...


8

You can try using the plain javascript reset method on a form $('form').each(function() { this.reset() }); This should reset each form to its default state. To re-enable all checkboxes, you can try: $(':checkbox').prop('disabled', false);


8

David Mark's "My Library" has a "DOM ready" functionality: http://www.cinsoft.net/mylib.html David is avid anti-framework, anti-bad-javascript-practice so it should be good quality code.


7

Firefox, Opera and Webkit-based browsers have a document-level event DOMContentLoaded that you can listen for with document.addEventListener("DOMContentLoaded", fn, false). It is more complicated in IE. What jQuery does in IE is watch onreadystatechange on the document object for a particular readystate with a backup of the document.onload event. ...


7

Perhaps I am missing something, but wouldn't you make your life a lot easier by doing: require(['jQuery', 'app' ], function(jQuery, app) { jQuery(function ($) { app.initialize(); }); }); in your main.js?


7

To the point first: No, there is no disadvantage in calling you init before closing the <body>. It will as you have noticed perform better that relying on $.ready() and will also work with all the browsers flawlessly (even on IE). Now, there are however reasons to use $.ready(), which in your case they do not probably apply: $.ready() makes it easy ...


7

I'm making the claim that the event type "DOMContentReady" does not exist in current implementations (meaning, that no current implementation fires such an event type), and that appearances of such a name are merely lapsus memoriae. The name "DOMContentLoaded" is not easily remembered, and since the jQuery library uses the method .ready() to bind this event ...


7

here is how you would go about doing it: // lower priority value means function should be called first var method_queue = new Array(); method_queue.push({ method : function() { alert('Hello World 1'); }, priority : 2 }); method_queue.push({ method : function() { alert('Hello World 2'); }, priority : 1 }); function sort_queue(a, ...


6

jQuery.ready();


6

If the ready callback(which fires the readyList) would have fire right away, you couldn't hold it's execution once the DOM is ready with the holdReady function. jQuery.holdReady( hold ) Description: Holds or releases the execution of jQuery's ready event. The $.holdReady() method allows the caller to delay jQuery's ready event. This advanced ...


6

1)The way you're binding, you can have just one method attached to an event. You need to add an event listener for what you want. window.addEventListener("load", function() { alert("hello!");}); Setting directly a method to the onload event will replace any previously attached method. But if you use listeners instead, you can have many of them bound to ...


6

By requiring the app from inside the domReady callback function, you should be able to require the domReady module, and then the app module synchronously. define(['require', 'domReady'], function(require, domReady) { domReady(function() { require(['app'], function(app) { app.initialize(); }); }); });


5

It should be, $(document).ready(function () { console.log("I don't want to play nice"); }); $(document).on("ready", handler), deprecated as of jQuery 1.8 http://api.jquery.com/ready/


5

You are declaring local variables inside the event handler, that's why you can't use them in the next event handler. Declare the variables outside the function: var closer, NewFormContainer, opener, NewForm, OpsForm, SelectBox, SelectBoxOptions, jquiBtn, AddOp, DelOp; $(function() { closer = $("#nlfcClose"); NewFormContainer = ...


5

document.ready behaves like a normal event in this respect, they happen in a sequence and in the order they were bound. You can see the relevant jQuery core source here: This is what happens when you do $(function): ready: function( fn ) { jQuery.bindReady(); if ( jQuery.isReady ) { fn.call( document, jQuery ); } else if ( readyList ) ...


5

You can, but there are issues surrounding doing it. First off, in IE if you attempt to manipulate a node that has not been closed (e.g. BODY before its close tag which should be below your JS) then you can encounter IE's "OPERATION ABORTED" error which will result in a blank page. Manipulation of a node includes appending nodes, moving nodes, etc. In other ...


5

It's because you need to remove the parenthesis; a function is an object, and you need to pass the function, not its return value. So, for your first example, you should have: window.addEvent('domready', function() { matchHeight('div#leftcolumn div.module_menu'); } ); Instead. For your second example, it's: function giveMessage() { alert('test'); } ...


5

Doing document.write from async-loaded scripts is not supported in HTML5, precisely because it's racy: you have no way to know whether your script will run before or after DOMContentLoaded. See http://www.whatwg.org/specs/web-apps/current-work/multipage/elements.html#ignore-destructive-writes-counter and ...


5

One advantage would be, that you are able to place the code anywhere in the page. In our case, we use a templating system in our CMS that stitches the page together from around 10 - 30 templates for the different parts (depending on complexity). Since you want the templates to work on any page they are used, you need to include the necessary Javascript in ...


5

Put your function in the success section of the $.ajax function? For example: $.ajax({ url: "test.html", context: document.body, success: function(){ $(element).addClass("done"); yourFunction(); } });


4

window.addEvent('domready', function() { $('video_popup').fireEvent('click'); }); Note the use addEvent/domready, which is the proper method to add a function which must execute once the page is ready.


4

If relying on document.readyState is ok, quick-and-dirty solution with polling: (function() { var state = document.readyState; if(state === 'interactive' || state === 'complete') { // do stuff } else setTimeout(arguments.callee, 100); })();



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