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44

Yes it does. Here is another way >>> sum(map( operator.mul, vector1, vector2)) 48 and another that doesn't use operator at all >>> vector1 = (2,3,5) >>> vector2 = (3,4,6) >>> sum(p*q for p,q in zip(vector1, vector2)) 48


20

n isn't the loop control variable, it's a.length which is an out of bounds index. You probably meant sum += a[i] * b[i]; And, although it does not matter directly, you probably meant your for-loop to be for (int i = 0; i < n; i++) (I would assume that's the reason you have n in the first place.)


15

How about: >>> A = np.array([[1,2,3,4],[5,6,7,8]]) >>> (A*A).sum(axis=0) array([26, 40, 58, 80]) EDIT: Hmm, okay, you don't want intermediate large objects. Maybe: >>> from numpy.core.umath_tests import inner1d >>> A = np.array([[1,2,3,4],[5,6,7,8]]) >>> inner1d(A.T, A.T) array([26, 40, 58, 80]) which ...


13

a * b sim(a,b) =-------- |a|*|b| a*b is dot product some details: def dot(a,b): n = length(a) sum = 0 for i in xrange(n): sum += a[i] * b[i]; return sum def norm(a): n = length(a) for i in xrange(n): sum += a[i] * a[i] return math.sqrt(sum) def cossim(a,b): return dot(a,b) / (norm(a) * norm(b)) yes. to some extent, ...


11

import numpy result = numpy.dot( numpy.array(A)[:,0], B) http://docs.scipy.org/doc/numpy/reference/ If you want to do it without numpy, try sum( [a[i][0]*b[i] for i in range(len(b))] )


11

very interesting, I was curious to see how it was implemented so I did: >>> import inspect >>> import numpy as np >>> inspect.getmodule(np.dot) <module 'numpy.core._dotblas' from '/Library/Python/2.6/site-packages/numpy-1.6.1-py2.6-macosx-10.6-universal.egg/numpy/core/_dotblas.so'> >>> So it looks like its using ...


11

Check out numpy.einsum for another method: In [52]: a Out[52]: array([[1, 2, 3], [3, 4, 5]]) In [53]: b Out[53]: array([[1, 2, 3], [1, 2, 3]]) In [54]: einsum('ij,ij->i', a, b) Out[54]: array([14, 26]) Looks like einsum is a bit faster than inner1d: In [94]: %timeit inner1d(a,b) 1000000 loops, best of 3: 1.8 us per loop In [95]: %...


10

As a general note, if you are calling numpy functions from within cython and doing little else, you generally will see only marginal gains if any at all. You generally only get massive speed-ups if you are statically typing code that makes use of an explicit for loop at the python level (not in something that is calling the Numpy C-API already). You could ...


10

You can do this in CUBLAS as long as you use the "V2" API. The newer API includes a function cublasSetPointerMode which you can use to set the API to assume that all routines which return a scalar value will be passed a device pointer rather than a host pointer. This is discussed in Section 2.4 of the latest CUBLAS documentation. For example: #include <...


9

Of the hundreds of SSE examples I've seen on SO, your code is one of the few that's already in pretty good shape from the start. You don't need the SSE4 dot-product instruction. (You can do better!) However, there is one thing you can try: (I say try because I haven't timed it yet.) Currently you have a data-dependency chain on res. Vector addition is 3-4 ...


7

simple java code implementation: static double cosine_similarity(Map<String, Double> v1, Map<String, Double> v2) { Set<String> both = Sets.newHashSet(v1.keySet()); both.retainAll(v2.keySet()); double sclar = 0, norm1 = 0, norm2 = 0; for (String k : both) sclar += v1.get(k) * v2.get(k); ...


7

Using int vs float data types causes different code paths to be executed: The stack trace for float looks like this: (gdb) backtr #0 0x007865a0 in dgemm_ () from /usr/lib/libblas.so.3gf #1 0x007559d5 in cblas_dgemm () from /usr/lib/libblas.so.3gf #2 0x00744108 in dotblas_matrixproduct (__NPY_UNUSED_TAGGEDdummy=0x0, args=(<numpy.ndarray at remote ...


7

The problem here is that addition of floating point numbers is not associative. When summing a sequence of numbers of comparable magnitude, this is not usually a problem. However, in your sequence, most numbers are around 1 or 10, while several entries have magnitude 10^26 or 10^27. Numerical problems are almost unavoidable in this situation. The ...


7

This is discussed in PEP 465. In short, it depends on the types of A and B. If they're numpy.ndarray, star means Hadamard product and matrix multiplication is done with the .dot() method. If they're numpy.matrix, star means matrix multiplication. If they're some other type (e.g. from a library other than NumPy), you'll have to consult that type's ...


6

See std::inner_product from <numeric>.


6

For code like this, I like to store the "transpose" of the A's and B's, so that {A_0m.x, A_1m.x, A_2m.x, A_3m.x} are stored in one vector, etc. Then you can do the dot product using just multiplies and adds, and when you're done, you have all 4 dot products in one vector without any shuffling. This is used frequently in raytracing, to test 4 rays at once ...


6

Getting a reduction right using ad hoc CUDA code can be tricky, so here's an alternative solution using a Thrust algorithm, which is included with the CUDA Toolkit: #include <thrust/inner_product.h> #include <thrust/device_ptr.h> double do_dot_product(int *n, double *a, double *b) { // wrap raw pointers to device memory with device_ptr ...


6

import operator a_dot = [reduce(operator.mul, col, 1) for col in zip(*a)] But if all your data is 0s and 1s: a_dot = [all(col) for col in zip(*a)]


6

One way would be to use np.einsum, which allows you to specify what you want to happen to the indices: >>> np.einsum('ik,jk->kij', puy, puy2) array([[[ 0, 0, 0], [ 0, 16, 32]], [[ 1, 5, 9], [ 5, 25, 45]], [[ 4, 12, 20], [12, 36, 60]], [[ 9, 21, 33], [21, 49, 77]]]) >>> np....


6

The documentation describes the behavior of reduce as follows: The first call will be with $a and $b set to the first two elements of the list, subsequent calls will be done by setting $a to the result of the previous call and $b to the next element in the list. Thus, in this case, on the first iteration reduce will set $a = 0 and $b = 1, and hence,...


5

My favorite Pythonic dot product is: sum([i*j for (i, j) in zip(list1, list2)]) So for your case we could do: sum([i*j for (i, j) in zip([K[0] for K in A], B)])


5

You would have to profile it to be sure, but I suspect you're losing a lot of time in serializing/deserializing JSON objects. Instead of turning token_vector into a JSON string, why not put it directly into Redis, since Redis has its own hash type? REDIS.hmset "feature1", *Feature.find(1).token_vector.flatten # ... REDIS.hmset "feature25", *Feature.find(...


5

You can also use the numpy implementation of dot product which has large array optimizations in native code to make computations slightly faster. Even better unless you are specifically trying to write a dot product routine or avoid dependencies, using a tried tested widely used library is much better than rolling your own.


5

Your arrays are not very big, so ATLAS probably isn't doing much. What are your timings for the following Fortran program? Assuming ATLAS isn't doing much, this should give you a sense of how fast dot() could be if there was not any python overhead. With gfortran -O3 I get speeds of 5 +/- 0.5 us. program test real*8 :: x(4000), start, finish, s ...


5

Perhaps the culprit is copying of the arrays passed to dot. As Sven said, the dot product relies on BLAS operations. These operations require arrays stored in contiguous C order. If both arrays passed to dot are in C_CONTIGUOUS, you ought to see better performance. Of course, if your two arrays passed to dot are indeed 1D (8,) then you should see both the ...


5

Before CUDA 4.0, multi-GPU programming required multi-threaded CPU programming. This can be challenging especially when you need to synchronize and/or communicate between the threads or GPUs. And if all of your parallelism is in your GPU code, then having multiple CPU threads may add to the complexity of your software without improving performance further ...


5

Here is a simple SSE implementation: #include "pmmintrin.h" __m128d vsum = _mm_set1_pd(0.0); double sum = 0.0; int k; // process 2 elements per iteration for (k = 0; k < n - 1; k += 2) { __m128d va = _mm_loadu_pd(&a[k]); __m128d vb = _mm_loadu_pd(&b[k]); __m128d vs = _mm_mul_pd(va, vb); vsum = _mm_add_pd(vsum, vs); } // ...


5

Using @BrodieG's sample data, you can just use the crossprod function: set.seed(1) vec1 <- sample(1:10) vec2 <- sample(1:10) vec3 <- sample(1:10) crossprod(cbind(vec1, vec2, vec3)) # vec1 vec2 vec3 # vec1 385 298 284 # vec2 298 385 296 # vec3 284 296 385 Some benchmarks, out of curiosity: The functions to run: fun1 <- ...


5

You can do this with np.einsum, which multiplies and then sums over any axes: np.arccos(np.einsum('ijk,ijk->ij', a, b)) The more straightforward way to do what you posted in the question is to use np.sum, where you sum along the last axis (-1): np.arccos(np.sum(a*b, -1)) They all give the same answer but einsum is the fastest and sum is next: In [...


5

Why complicate things? How about simple matrix multiplication: s = sum(p * n(:)) where p is assumed to be an M-by-3 matrix.



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