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5

Both of the above are good. Other ones include: Sesame - Java covering RDF, SPARQL, OWL. Actively developed Redland, Raptor Rasqal - C & Ruby, covers everything, actively developed ARC2 - PHP, RDF, SPARQL, no longer activel developed You've also got a lot of supporting frameworks for things like ORDFM that build off the above namely: ...


3

Put newlines in the query string to make the error messages better. There are no SPARQL quotes at regex(str(?x),"+tmp+") Try: regex(str(?x),'"+tmp+"') which puts single quotes into the SPARQL. Be careful of any quotes in tmp.


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Answer is probably here: Reading RDF


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As @cygri notes you should look at the Reading RDF documentation. Here is the first example from the Querying with SPARQL page which shows loading a file to query: using System; using VDS.RDF; using VDS.RDF.Parsing; using VDS.RDF.Query; public class InMemoryTripleStoreExample { public static void Main(String[] args) { TripleStore store = ...


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DBPedia has known issues with encoding and it may be simply that DBPedia is producing dud data. What you can try to do to debug this further in dotNetRDF is to wrap the code that invokes the query with the following: try { Options.HttpDebugging = true; Options.HttpFullDebugging = true; //Try your query here } finally { Options.HttpDebugging = ...


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the best answer i've found in Answers.semantiweb Give a try to dotNetRDF. I have been used it in one of my projects and I am satisfied with it. It is SPARQL-capable, supports both local and remote queries and, the most important, it is actively maintained i've started using dotnetRDF the creator also have left a good documentation on the ...


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Actually everything in dotNetRDF is designed to support streaming parsing, the most common use case happens to be loading stuff into our in-memory structures but even that uses the streaming parser subsystem under the hood. See the Advanced Parsing section of the Reading RDF documentation which introduces the Handlers API, this API gives users complete ...


3

The second part of your union is responsible for your result : you query for all triples from all the graphs in your store since no variable is bound. The first part actually returns nothing. You have two solutions here: 1) you add your graph in the default dataset with: myGraph.baseUri = null Before adding the store.add(myGraph) statement Then the ...


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Yes, it looks like DBPedia is doing the wrong thing and for some reason returning Turtle with the Content-Type of text/plain rather than the appropriate value for Turtle which would be application/turtle. Hence why dotNetRDF selects the NTriples parser and then runs into issues. It would be worth reporting this to the DBPedia folks to see if they can fix ...


2

A note on Data Modelling So firstly are you sure that when you talk about lists you necessarily intend RDF lists? The distinction is important because it changes the shape of the data and how you accomplish things. An RDF list is an ordered sequence of blank nodes that connect values together e.g. @prefix rdf: ...


2

However I don't know what xsd:float() and STRBEFORE return. Is there anyway to bind the return value to a variable and output from SELECT? You want BIND: select ?floatValue ?milesBetween where { … BIND( xsd:float(STRBEFORE(?value, " miles")) as ?floatValue ) BIND( app:miles-between(?coord1, ?coord2) as ?milesBetween ) }


2

This behaviour is entirely by design, something that appears only in the predicate position is considered an edge in the graph rather than a node in the graph. As the Working with Graphs documentation states the following: To select Nodes there are methods which can be used to find a Node from a Graph (if it exists) which are the GetXNode() methods ...


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The problem is that your update operates over the default graph but that your dataset only contains a named graph. FileLoader.Load(rdf, rdfFilePath, new RdfXmlParser()); store.Add(rdf); When you do the above this loads data into your graph and assigns that graph a name based on the source of the data - in your case it gets a file:// URI. Then when you ...


2

Assuming based on your previous question that this also relates to dotNetRDF you aren't querying the data you think you are, to quote from the Querying with SPARQL documentation: A common error with making queries is that queries by default typically operate only over the unnamed default graph in the store (depending on your query processor). ...


2

Your query does not actually match your data which is why your DELETE has no effect. In your data you have ns0:ID but in your DELETE you try to match against ns0:nodeID - therefore no data will be matched and nothing will be deleted.


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The two things are not really comparable, dotNetRDF is a programming API that provides support for a variety of storage backends in addition to a pure in-memory solution which we mainly recommend for testing and development (Disclaimer I'm the lead developer) The different backends have a wide variety of performance characteristics so if your problem is ...


2

No you are not using dotNetRDF incorrectly rather there appears to be a bug that the timeouts set on an endpoint don't get honoured when running queries asynchronously. This has been filed as CORE-393 By the way even with this bug fixed you won't necessarily get a hard timeout at the set timeout. Essentially the value you set for the Timeout property of ...


2

So as noted in the comments this was indeed a bug in the property path engine - see CORE-395 Essentially the problem was that when dotNetRDF translated the paths for evaluation it was not correctly allocating temporary variables. This meant that the designated paths were not actually being properly evaluated which either led to the error you saw or to ...


2

My problem is that I would like to retrieve all subjects containing cim:ACLineSegment, whatever the ID they may have. <cim:ACLineSegment rdf:ID="_05b8"> <!-- some code... --> </cim:ACLineSegment> Your subjects don't “contain” cim:ACLineSegment. Subjects don't contain anything in RDF. Resources (including subjects of ...


2

The extra attribute q:qname is a Sesame-specific extension of the standard format. It is a configuration setting that is supported by Sesame's SPARQLXMLWriter but is not enabled by default. It appears, however, that the Workbench client application enables this feature and adds these additional attributes when exporting query results. So I suspect that you ...


2

Your query is invalid SPARQL, if you include some white space you can easily see this: SELECT ?s WHERE { ?s rdf:type cim:TopologicalNode ; cim:TopologicalNode.BaseVoltage ?o rdf:resource '#_2a9' ; } After the ?o you immediately state another predicate and object pair but fail to include any additional punctuation to separate the tokens and ...


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See the same question, with answer, at http://answers.semanticweb.com/questions/23254/sparqlresultset-giving-the-remote-server-returned-an-error-400-bad-request


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I think the answer is that you can, but probably don't want to! You should be able to do it with the SPARQL 1.1 SUBSTR function, along with concat and strdt. Something along the lines of strdt(concat(substr(?x, 7, 4), '-', substr(?x, 1, 2), '-', substr(?x, 4, 2), 'T00:00:00'), xsd:dateTime) Where ?x is bound to your MM/DD/YYYY date value. The return ...


2

The error message refers to the following part of your code: g.CreateUriNode("owl:Class") This uses a prefixed name as a shortcut for the full URI which requires the owl prefix to be defined in your graph. If you are getting this then your RDF file does not include this, you can define this like so: g.NamespaceMap.AddNamespace("prefix", new ...


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You've asked this question in about three different places (here, answers.semanticweb.com and on the dotnetrdf mailing list) Firstly you may want to take a look at our FAQ which has a section called My query returns no results? which covers common problems users encounter with making SPARQL queries. Please work through that to see if any of the common ...


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Right now you can't, most of SparqlQuery is intentionally sealed because a lot of the properties and related classes like GraphPattern represent the AST and when we originally designed the class we didn't want people to intentionally/accidentally modify the AST in ways that created broken queries. There is a fluent-query branch in the works which will ...


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You can use CreateURINode from INodeFactory (which IGraph extends) to create the rdf:type node, and have something like: graph.GetTriplesWithPredicateObject( graph.CreateUriNode( UriFactory.createUri( "http://www.w3.org/1999/02/22-rdf-syntax-ns#type" )), , graph.CreateUriNode( UriFactory.createUri( "http://www.example.com/InterestingThing" )) ) This ...


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If you ever come across a SNORQL UI for an endpoint you can always find the actual SPARQL endpoint URI from the Page Title and Header, for your example note it says the following in both places: Snorql: Exploring http://dblp.l3s.de/d2r/sparql The URI here is the one you want for your uri_v variable. Often the default graph (your dguri_v) argument is ...


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Did you actually look at the Inner Exception as the exception messages tells you to? That would contain the XmlException that was produced and would tell you exactly what is wrong with your RDF/XML including positional information i.e. where in the file the error is. In your case your problem happens to be that you have defined the rdf namespace twice on ...


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Seeing line 456 would be useful. Try making the request with wget (it encodes URLs, curl doesn't, making it easier to use from the command line). Unicode codepoint 8211 is EN DASH (hex 2013). LIMIT in CONSTRUCT is the number of row from the graph pattern and not the CONSTRUCT template. You may get more triples that is covered by the SELECT ... LIMIT. ...



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