Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

985

float and double are floating binary point types. In other words, they represent a number like this: 10001.10010110011 The binary number and the location of the binary point are both encoded within the value. decimal is a floating decimal point type. In other words, they represent a number like this: 12345.65789 Again, the number and the location of ...


418

Precision is the main difference. Float - 7 digits (32 bit) Double-15-16 digits (64 bit) Decimal -28-29 significant digits (128 bit) Decimals have much higher precision and are usually used within financial applications that require a high degree of accuracy. Decimals are much slower (up to 20X times in some tests) than a double/float. Decimals and ...


410

For money, always decimal. It's why it was created. If numbers must add up correctly or balance, use decimal. This includes any financial storage or calculations, scores, or other numbers that people might do by hand. If the exact value of numbers is not important, use double for speed. This includes graphics, physics or other physical sciences ...


162

I'd say the answer depends on the rounding mode when converting the double to float. float has 24 binary bits of precision, and double has 53. In binary, 0.1 is: 0.1₁₀ = 0.0001100110011001100110011001100110011001100110011…₂ ^ ^ ^ ^ 1 10 20 24 So if we round up at the 24th digit, we'll get 0.1₁₀ ~ ...


160

If you use double or float, you should use rounding or expect to see some rounding errors. If you can't do this, use BigDecimal. The problem you have is that 0.1 is not an exact representation, and by performing the calculation twice, you are compounding that error. However, 100 can be represented accurately, so try: double x = 1234; x /= 100; ...


159

According to the IEEE standard, NaN values have the odd property that comparisons involving them are always false. That is, for a float f, f != f will be true only if f is NaN. Note that, as some comments below have pointed out, not all compilers respect this when optimizing code. For any compiler which claims to use IEEE floating point, this trick ...


151

I think you've summarised the advantages quite well. You are however missing one point. The decimal type is only more accurate at representing base 10 numbers (e.g. those used in currency/financial calculations). In general, the double type is going to offer at least as great precision (someone correct me if I'm wrong) and definitely greater speed for ...


132

Assuming 64-bit IEEE double, there is a 52-bit mantissa and 11-bit exponent. Look at the following numbers: 1.0000 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 × 2^0 = 1 The smallest representable number greater than 1: 1.0000 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000001 × 2^0 = 1 + 2^-52 Therefore: epsilon = (1 + 2^-52) - 1 = 2^-52 ...


114

You can use Double.parseDouble() to convert a String to a double: String text = "12.34"; // example String double value = Double.parseDouble(text); For your case it looks like you want: double total = Double.parseDouble(jlbTotal.getText()); double price = Double.parseDouble(jlbPrice.getText());


105

There is no isnan() function available in current C++ Standard Library. It was introduced in C99 and defined as a macro not a function. Elements of standard library defined by C99 are not part of current C++ standard ISO/IEC 14882:1998 neither its update ISO/IEC 14882:2003. In 2005 Technical Report 1 was proposed. The TR1 brings compatibility with C99 to ...


96

Here's an utility that rounds (instead of truncating) a double to specified number of decimal places. For example: round(200.3456, 2); // returns 200.35 Original version; watch out with this public static double round(double value, int places) { if (places < 0) throw new IllegalArgumentException(); long factor = (long) Math.pow(10, places); ...


88

My question is when should a use a double and when should I use a decimal type? decimal for when you work with values in the range of 10^(+/-28) and where you have expectations about the behaviour based on base 10 representations - basically money. double for when you need relative accuracy (i.e. losing precision in the trailing digits on large ...


78

When you type 33.33333333333333, the value you get is actually the closest representable double-precision value, which is exactly: 33.3333333333333285963817615993320941925048828125 Dividing that by 100 gives: 0.333333333333333285963817615993320941925048828125 which also isn't representable as a double-precision number, so again it is rounded to the ...


73

float is a single precision (32 bit) floating point data type as defined by IEEE 754 (it is used mostly in graphic libraries). double is a double precision (64 bit) floating point data type as defined by IEEE 754 (probably the most normally used data type for real values). decimal is a 128-bit floating point data type, it should be used where precision is ...


71

I use the following: double x = Math.Truncate(myDoubleValue * 100) / 100; For instance: If the number is 50.947563 and you use the following, the following will happen: - Math.Truncate(50.947563 * 100) / 100; - Math.Truncate(5094.7563) / 100; - 5094 / 100 - 50.94 And there's your answer truncated, now to format the string simply do the following: ...


71

A BigDecimal is an exact way of representing numbers. A Double has a certain precision. Working with doubles of various magnitudes (say d1=1000.0 and d2=0.001) could result in the 0.001 being dropped alltogether when summing as the difference in magnitude is so large. With BigDecimal this would not happen. The disadvantage of BigDecimal is that it's slower, ...


66

If the idea is to print integers stored as doubles as if they are integers, and otherwise print the doubles with the minimum necessary precision: public static String fmt(double d) { if(d == (int) d) return String.format("%d",(int)d); else return String.format("%s",d); } Produces: 232 0.18 1237875192 4.58 0 1.2345 And does not ...


64

I did a quick non-scientific test in Release mode. I used two inputs: "2.34523" and "badinput" into both methods and iterated 1,000,000 times. Valid input: Double.TryParse = 646ms Convert.ToDouble = 662 ms Not much different, as expected. For all intents and purposes, for valid input, these are the same. Invalid input: Double.TryParse = 612ms ...


63

There is also a header-only library present in Boost that have neat tools to deal with floating point datatypes #include <boost/math/special_functions/fpclassify.hpp> You get the following functions: template <class T> bool isfinite(T z); template <class T> bool isinf(T t); template <class T> bool isnan(T t); template <class ...


61

You can't do it directly. There are a number of ways to do it: Use a std::stringstream: std::ostringstream s; s << "(" << c1 << ", " << c2 << ")"; storedCorrect[count] = s.str() Use boost::lexical_cast: storedCorrect[count] = "(" + boost::lexical_cast<std::string>(c1) + ", " + ...


56

Answer to this and all mapping of types can be found here. http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb386947.aspx Chart, stolen from that page: Updated 1/7/2013 - there's a more recent version, .not so colorful here: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc716729.aspx


55

// The C way: char buffer[32]; snprintf(buffer, sizeof(buffer), "%g", myDoubleVar); // The C++03 way: std::ostringstream sstream; sstream << myDoubleVar; std::string varAsString = sstream.str(); // The C++11 way: std::string varAsString = std::to_string(myDoubleVar); // The boost way: std::string varAsString = ...


53

The number 0.1 will be rounded to the closest floating-point representation with the given precision. This approximation might be either greater than or less than 0.1, so without looking at the actual values, you can't predict whether the single precision or double precision approximation is greater. Here's what the double precision value gets rounded to ...


51

If you just want to print a double with two digits after the decimal point, use something like this: double value = 200.3456; System.out.printf("Value: %.2f", value); If you want to have the result in a String instead of being printed to the console, use String.format() with the same arguments: String result = String.format("%.2f", value); Or use class ...


49

NSMutableArray only holds objects, so you want an array to be loaded with NSNumber objects. Create each NSNumber to hold your double then add it to your array. Perhaps something like this. NSMutableArray *array = [[NSMutableArray alloc] init]; NSNumber *num = [NSNumber numberWithFloat:10.0f]; [array addObject:num]; Repeat as needed.


49

Java doubles are in IEEE-754 format, therefore they have a 52-bit fraction; between any two adjacent powers of two (inclusive of one and exclusive of the next one), there will therefore be 2 to the 52th power different doubles (i.e., 4503599627370496 of them). For example, that's the number of distinct doubles between 0.5 included and 1.0 excluded, and ...


48

It's not that you're actually getting extra precision - it's that the float didn't accurately represent the number you were aiming for originally. The double is representing the original float accurately; toString is showing the "extra" data which was already present. For example (and these numbers aren't right, I'm just making things up) support you had: ...


47

when a variable is assigned a number entered with one decimal place, such as 4.2, the float or double used in the comparison actually may have a value such as 4.1999998092651367 Not may. will. To be specific: float f = 4.2; // f is exactly 4.19999980926513671875 double d = 4.2; // d is exactly 4.20000000000000017763568394002504646778106689453125 ...


44

As others have mentioned, you'll probably want to use the BigDecimal class, if you want to have an exact representation of 11.4. Now, a little explanation into why this is happening: The float and double primitive types in Java are floating point numbers, where the number is stored as a binary representation of a fraction and a exponent. More ...


42

Floating point arithmetic will almost always be significantly faster because it is supported directly by the hardware. So far almost no widely used hardware supports decimal arithmetic (although this is changing, see comments). Financial applications should always use decimal numbers, the number of horror stories stemming from using floating point in ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible