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0

Converting one kind of array into another is a job for map, which applies a function to each element of an array, returning the results as a new array of the type that function returns. In this case, you want a function that converts the Ints to a Double. Try something like this: let integers = Array(0...33) let fractions = Array(0...999) let ...


1

my programs gives me the wrong output. This is the right output for double, just not what you expected. Floating point approximates values which it cannot represent accurately. In this case 1.5 is accurately represented as a sum or powers of two 2^0 + 2^-1, however 12.99 need to be approximated. When you print a floating point numebr it "knows" the ...


1

double d = 0.7F; System.out.println( d ); print the value: 0.699999988079071 The conversion is correct. When you print out a float f, it prints out enough digits so that the value it prints out is closer to the true value of f than any other float. When you print out a double, it prints out enough digits so that the value it prints out is closer to ...


2

If you know what precision you want you can round it to say 6 decimal places. eg. public static double round6(double x) { return Math.round(x * 1e6) / 1e6; } round6(0.7f) == 0.7 The fact the x passed in was a float doesn't matter provided this precision is suitable.


2

But create an additional String. Are there a more performance conversion of float to double without an extra string? Allocating a short-lived block of a few bytes is only the tip of the iceberg. The “conversion” that you desire fundamentally requires going from binary floating-point to decimal representation and then back to binary floating-point, and ...


3

if it's all about the output (for humans) i would suggest to use printf: System.out.printf("Value: %.2f", d); doing the conversion with FloatingDecimal is surely faster, and prints 0.7 as well Double doubleResult = new FloatingDecimal(0.7F).doubleValue();


5

Yes, use double d = 0.7D; Using F means it's a float constant, and then it's promoted to double and may not be the closest number to 0.7 that can be represented with a double precision floating point, as the mantissa is not extended in any way. 0.7D is a double constant to begin with.


2

Using wrong format specifier invoke undefined behavior and that's why you are getting unexpected result. Once UB is invoked, you may either get expected or unexpected result. Nothing can be said. Use %lf to read double type data.


1

You should use scanf("%lf", &y);


1

You are using the wrong format specifier in the scanf and doing this will result in UB(Undefined Behaviour).The correct format specifier for a double is %lf while that of a float is %f. So Just change your scanf to scanf("%lf",&y);


3

Use scanf("%lf", &y); instead. Since scanf("%f", &y); works for floats only. If you enable compiler warnings it would tell you that the format specifier "%f" expects a float * and not double * argument.


2

I'd recommend rounding the number based on the number of digits in your double so that the NSDecimalNumber is truncated to only show the appropriate number of digits, thus eliminating the digits formed by potential error, ex: // Get the number of decimal digits in the double int digits = [self countDigits:calc1]; // Round based on the number of decimal ...


3

Well, you can either use double to represent the numbers and embrace inaccuracies or use some different number representation, such as NSDecimalNumber. It all depends on what are the expected values and business requirements concerning accuracy. If it is really crucial not to use arithmetic methods provided by NSDecimalNumber, than the rounding behaviour is ...


2

The biggest integer value represented by double is : 2^53 , for details look here. And the biggest value can be represented wit max digits after the point depends on the number itself, but the max number of digits (for example when representing 0.1) is 0.1000000000000000055511151231257827021181583404541015625 have a look at this answer. And the MAX_VALUE ...


0

I think your code should look like follwing: import javax.swing.*; public class CandidateCode { public static void main (String[] args) { String input; input=JOptionPane.showInputDialog("What is the radius of the cylinder?"); double r=Double.parseDouble(input); input=JOptionPane.showInputDialog("What is the height of ...


0

import javax.swing.*; public class Cylinder_Volume { public static void main (String[] args) { String input; input=JOptionPane.showInputDialog("What is the radius of the cylinder?"); Double r; r=Double.parseDouble(input); input=JOptionPane.showInputDialog("What is the height of the cylinder?"); Double ...


0

Try Double.parseDouble(0.0); Use Double as an object, not a primitive. The call on the object, returns the primitive double.


3

2 errors 1) it's String not string 2) double.parsedouble not correct it should be Double.parseDouble don't forget java is case sensitive and method names have camel case import javax.swing.*; public class Cylinder_Volume { public static void main (String[] args) { String input;//first error you have types string //s should be capital ...


0

you might want to use Double.parseDouble(input) instead of double.parsedouble(input).


-1

Beginners needs practical examples. so try the following code. public class Not_a_Number { public static void main(String[] args) { // TODO Auto-generated method stub String message = "0.0/0.0 is NaN.\nsimilarly Math.sqrt(-1) is NaN."; String dottedLine = "------------------------------------------------"; Double numerator = ...


17

This result doesn't surprise me given how floating-point numbers are represented. Let's suppose we had a very short floating-point type with only 4 bits of precision. If we were to generate a random number between 0 and 1, distributed uniformly, there would be 16 possible values: 0.0000 0.0001 0.0010 0.0011 0.0100 ... 0.1110 0.1111 If that's how they ...


34

From the docs: The method nextDouble is implemented by class Random as if by: public double nextDouble() { return (((long)next(26) << 27) + next(27)) / (double)(1L << 53); } But it also states the following (emphasis mine): [In early versions of Java, the result was incorrectly calculated as: return (((long)next(27) << ...


92

Because nextDouble works like this: (source) public double nextDouble() { return (((long) next(26) << 27) + next(27)) / (double) (1L << 53); } next(x) makes x random bits. Now why does this matter? Because about half the numbers generated by the first part (before the division) are less than 1L << 52, and therefore their significand ...


0

Re when inaccuracies may occur: Barring getting deep into the technical details of IEEE-754 double-precision floating point and having your code tailor itself to the specific characteristics of the two values it's operating on, you won't know when a result will be inaccurate; any operation, including simple addition, can result in an inaccurate result (as ...


1

You almost had it. It's // colon --+ +-----+---- the units were mixed up // v v v scanf(" %[^:]: %lfkn %lfL", tmpName, &tmpQuant, &tmpPrice); However, to make it safe you should include the length of the buffer in the string match: char tmpName[128]; // for example // v--- length here scanf(" %128[^:]: %lfkn %lfL", ...


0

According to me you need to typecast your someint in double before assigning it to x.


1

In order to create a "negative" double from an unsigned int you must first negate as an integer and cast to double (either by bitwise negation or changing signs): #include <stdio.h> int main () { unsigned int x = 44231; /* unsigned number */ int i = ~x; /* bitwise not gives negative */ double d = ...


4

There is no such thing as a "negative unsigned int". Unsigned int is always positive. Your -someint produces the value 0 if someint = 0, and UINT_MAX + 1 - someint otherwise according to the C rules. Use instead double x = - (double) someint;


2

Instead of working with dollar amounts in a double, use cents in an int. This will eliminate the roundoff error that inevitably creeps in when doing double arithmetic, especially repeated subtractions. The problem is that computers don't work in decimal like humans, they work in binary. A simple decimal such as 0.10 can't be represented exactly in binary ...


3

"e-015" is your clue that the "change" is essentially $0, and that this is just a rounding error. Your teacher at least needs to learn about rounding errors! If you have $0.50 or $0.25, this can be represented exactly in binary, but $0.05 will be a repeating fraction in binary and can't be represented exactly...the endless repeating sequence of 00101's ...


0

Floating-point numbers, also known as real numbers, are used when evaluating expressions that require fractional precision. For example, calculations such as square root, or transcendentals such as sine and cosine, result in a value whose precision requires a floating-point type. Java implements the standard (IEEE–754) set of floatingpoint types and ...


5

The Wikipedia page on it is a good place to start. To sum up: float is represented in 32 bits, with 1 sign bit, 8 bits of exponent, and 23 bits of the mantissa (or what follows from a scientific-notation number: 2.33728*1012; 33728 is the mantissa). double is represented in 64 bits, with 1 sign bit, 11 bits of exponent, and 53 bits of mantissa. By ...


1

A float gives you approx. 6-7 decimal digits precision while a double gives you approx. 15-16. Also the range of numbers is larger for double. A double needs 8 bytes of storage space while a float needs just 4 bytes.


0

I can't see your BankAccount class, so I made this one: public class BankAccount { private double balance; public BankAccount(double balance) { this.balance = balance; } public double getBalance() { return this.balance; } @Override public String toString() { return Double.toString(this.balance); } } ...


0

It seems that your issue is that you know how many sports in the account array are filled, but not where they are. So you're iterating from 0 .. filled - 1, but what if the array looks like: {BankAccount@123, null, BankAccount@234} Then there are 2 non-null bank accounts in the array, but they are indices 0 and 2, not 0 and 1 (as your for loop hopes for). ...


0

>>> float("1234.56") 1234.56 >>> int("1234") 1234 >>> long("12345678910") 12345678910 The float() and int() operators will be sufficient, as Python floats are usually the equivalent of C doubles, and if the integer is too large, int() will cast it to a long int. However, the long() operator will work if you want to explicitly ...


0

input() returns a string, which when evaluated returns None. If you're trying to assign an integer value to your variables, use the int() function: m = int(input("Enter value for m: ")) n = int(input("Enter value for n: ")) Also, using eval is almost always a bad idea, as it runs the input as Python code, with the permissions of the script. If you must ...


-1

the main difference between each of these is the precision. float is a 32-bit number, double is a 64-bit number and decimal is a 128-bit number.


1

Now a day BigDecimal you will get Java.Please read and learn it about BigDecimal BigDecimal value=new BigDecimal("5.36777777"); System.out.println( value.round(new MathContext(2, RoundingMode.CEILING)));


1

double has more accuracy of precision that float but still has rounding errors. You have to round any answer you get to have a sane output. If this is not desireable you can use BigDecimal which does not have rounding errors, but has its own headaches IMHO. The default Float.toString() uses minimal rounding, but often its not enough. ...


1

Your function returns true on -1, so it doesn't work. That's easy enough to fix, but your approach has other fundamental problems. In any rounding mode, it will compute either infinity or the largest normal number when applied to the smallest positive nonzero subnormal. Taking the product will result in either infinity or something much less than 1. In ...


0

Since C++11 just use to_string(double val) from <string>.


1

According to Floating Point page on wikipedia, double precision normally correspond to what you use : 53 bits for mantissa. But you can also find an extended format (80 bits) with 64 bits of mantissa, 32 bits single precision float (24 bits of mantissa), quadruple precision (112 bits of mantissa), and probably other on less common architectures. So as ...


2

The code here, named after Dekker, computes the exact error of an IEEE 754 binary64 multiplication (with some restrictions on the arguments). Barring underflow or overflow, the multiplication of nextafter(1.0, 0.0) by x is exact iff x is zero or a power of two. So you could use the algorithm to compute the exact error of multiplying nextafter(1.0, 0.0) by x ...


12

You can use frexp as a portable way to split the double into exponent and mantissa, and then check that the mantissa is exactly 0.5. example: #include <math.h> bool isPow2(double x) { int exponent = 0; auto mantissa1 = frexp(x, &exponent); return mantissa1 == 0.5; } BOOST_AUTO_TEST_CASE(powers_of_2) { std::vector<double> ...


0

Please try folllowing: using System; public class Program { public static void Main() { string[] products= { "10.5","20.5","50.5"}; foreach (var product in products) { Console.WriteLine(Convert.ToDouble(product)); } } } Live Demo


2

If you need to convert the whole array to doubles, you could do this: using System.Linq; var doubleProduct = product.Select(p => double.Parse(p)).ToArray(); Edit You can also use Array.ConvertAll() which is apparently more efficient (Thanks @PetSerAl for the tip). It also means you don't need Linq: var doubleProduct = Array.ConvertAll(product, p ...


2

your line could be throw exception if the user type some invalid double double units = Convert.ToDouble(Console.ReadLine()); you should do this double units ; if (!double.TryParse(Console.ReadLine(), out units )) { //units is not a double } else{ //units is a double }


1

using System; public class Example { public static void Main() { string[] values= { "-1,035.77219", "1AFF", "1e-35", "1,635,592,999,999,999,999,999,999", "-17.455", "190.34001", "1.29e325"}; double result; foreach (string value in values) { try { result = ...


2

There's no need to write it to console and read it back.. simply: var units = Convert.ToDouble(product[1]); You might also consider using Double.TryParse() to check whether the value can be converted into a double and isn't a string of letters.



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