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21

Simply put, static analysis collect information based on source code and dynamic analysis is based on the system execution, often using instrumentation. Advantages of dynamic analysis Is able to detect dependencies that is not possible in static analysis. Ex.: dynamic dependencies using reflection, dependency injection, polimorphism. Can collect temporal ...


8

As already mentioned in the comments, solving this is theoretically impossible - at least in the general case when the predicates can run code that may not terminate (e.g. a recursive call), meaning that there is a proof that you cannot ever implement a program that will be able to do this correctly on all inputs. In practice, it really depends on what you ...


6

I'm trying to give a short answer: Static analysis looks at the syntactical structure of code and draws conclusions about the program behavior. These conclusions must not always be correct. A typical example of static analysis is data flow analysis, where you compute sets like used, read, write for every statement. This will help to find e.g. uninitialized ...


6

Chris Grindstaff wrote an article FindBugs, Part 2: Writing custom detectors in which he describes how to use the BCEL to add your own rules. (BCEL isn't the only bytecode library - but it is the one used by FindBugs.) The code below emits any cases where a method accesses a static method or field. You could run it on any type that implements Runnable. ...


5

Regarding your first point you could consider using the analyze library. With it you can quite easily figure out which dynamic vars are used in an expression: user> (def ^:dynamic *increment* 3) user> (def src '(defn f [x] (+ x *increment*))) user> (def env {:ns {:name 'user} :context :eval}) user> (->> (analyze-one env ...


4

Basically you instrument your code to analyze your software as it is running (dynamic) rather than just analyzing the software without running (static). Also see this JavaOne presentation comparing the two. Valgrind is one example dynamic analysis tool for C. You could also use code coverage tools like Cobertura or EMMA for Java analysis. From Wikipedia's ...


4

The Frama-C platform, which is dedicated to the analysis of C code, has a full-fledged interprocedural slicing plugin. See for example this page, where an user uses this plugin to simplify a program he was analyzing.


4

[EDIT] (in reponse to OP revised question) I've been following the literature for quite a long time. I don't think there's a "program slicing" central that has a list of the kind you want. Most of the program slicers that have been built were some kind of university experiment (means they didn't work in production and aren't available for practical ...


3

cppcheck checks both C and C++ code and finds many errors. Valgrind is a tool for runtime analysis, but I mention it anyway. It is extremely useful for tracking memory errors like uninitialized usage or leaks. Also, activate ALL warnings your compiler has (GCC and clang: -Wall -Wpedantic -Wextra), which often reveals useful info. Note: clang sometimes ...


3

Visual studio has warnings for some of these. C4946, for example. They're mostly turned off by default though. http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/23k5d385.aspx


3

Given that there is no reliable way of telling what type the pointer points to at compile time, this is a pretty hard problem to catch at compile time. The simplest method is to do the catch at run-time, using a macro "safe_cast" which compiles to a dynamic_cast with an assert in debug, and a static_cast in release. Now, during debugging, if the cast is ...


3

Soot is an analysis framework for java. "The Soot framework for Java program analysis: a retrospective" says that the Spark module might be relevant to what you're doing: Spark implements a number of different call graph construction methods, including Class Hierarchy Analysis and Rapid Type Analysis; however, we found that the most effective call ...


3

Check out the ProcessTap project. Appears to implement exactly what you are looking for: http://code.google.com/p/processtap/


2

The latest version of FindBugs will attempt to check that fields marked with the @GuardedBy annotation are accessed only within the appropriate guard code.


2

IMHO, the best "tool" for this is a textbook. This is one of those areas where the software can't do it for you. Sure, it can build simple selects & joins, but not aggregate functions or groupings, or sub-selects, etc. For that, you've got to learn to do it the old fashioned way -- by hand/wetware. I recommend: "Head First SQL" by Lynn Beighley, via ...


2

Coverity Thread Analyzer does the job, but that is quite expensive. IBM Multi-Thread Run-time Analysis Tool for Java seems to be able to detect those but it appears somewhat more difficult to set up. These are dynamical analysis tools that detect which actual variables were accessed from different threads without proper synchronization or volatility, so ...


2

You asked for a good explanation of "bounds checking and memory analysis" issues. Our Memory Safety Check tool instruments your application to watch at runtime for memory access errors (buffer overruns, array subscript errors, bad pointers, alloc/free errors). The link contains a detailed explanation complete with examples. A briefer example: C (and ...


2

Check out Glassbox, a troubleshooting agent for Java applications that automatically diagnoses common problems. Glassbox deploys as a war file to your appserver and then uses AspectJ load time weaving to monitor application components and other artifacts, in order to identify problems like excess or failed remote calls, slow queries, too many database ...


2

Cobertura and Emma will perform code coverage analysis. In terms of multi-threaded correctness, FindBugs will do some of this. However it performs static analysis. i.e. not whilst the program is running.


2

CLRProfiler can capture/display CallGraph: http://www.scribd.com/doc/3376247/CLRProfiler. The file format is documented, so you can add your own analisys.


2

What this says is essentially the famous Turing incomputability result: in general, you can't know the answer to what a computation does (or generates as a type). While this is true in general, it says nothing about specific circumstances. A little thought should convince you that if programmers didn't have some idea what the type of some identifier was, ...


2

dtrace -c './main' -n 'pid$target:main::entry' -n 'pid$target:main::return' In this way I can have in output all the functions called at runtime, it will fire at the enter of a function and at its return. The code I'm probing is this: #include <iostream> #include <stdlib.h> #include <time.h> using namespace std; class Polygon { ...


1

You don't get a choice about whether you need a parser or not. You need it (including a full preprocessor). What you especially don't want to do is roll your own parser; C is way more complicated that you think, and then you have to worry about the specific dialect of C of interest. But a parser is hardly enough; you need a tool that can resolve names to ...


1

I've personally been very happy with ANTS memory profiler for memory leaks diagnostics. MS CLR Profiler is, as far as I know, considered obsolete, and Microsoft created new tool for this purpose. PerfView Perfview release announcement Download link Tutorials


1

Not a call graph but a call list but IntelliTrace in VS can tell you the call history. If you filter for calls to constructors you probably can get most of the way there.


1

ANTS lets you visualize the call graph. Not precisely what you're looking for, but it might help. They have a 14 day trial and if you decide to buy it, it's well worth the money for profiling your .NET apps. The .NET Memory Profiler lets you view instance graphs as well. A bit less spendy than ANTS and might do what you need to do.


1

TOAD is probably the best multi-database tool for this sort of thing, however I do not believe there is any substitute for thoroughly groking SQL yourself. If you have difficulty constructing a query then it's going to be well nigh impossible to debug it effectively.


1

Every database comes with internal command to analyze complex sqls, explaining which join is not-efficient or taking more time to execute. Ex: if you are using mysql then command is : explain


1

VisualVM is a visual tool integrating several commandline JDK tools and lightweight profiling capabilities. Designed for both production and development time use, it further enhances the capability of monitoring and performance analysis for the Java SE platform.


1

YourKit Java Profiler is probably the most powerful Java profiler out there. It is not free but not unreasonably expensive either. If it doesn't have the feature you are looking for, I kinda doubt any application would.



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