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3

There doesn't seem to be any point in utilizing pos_x_h and pos_y_h as pointer arrays. Change this: double *pos_x_h[224]; double *pos_y_h[224]; To this: double pos_x_h[224]; double pos_y_h[224]; And this: *pos_x_h[n] = i * dx + (j % 2) * dx / 2.0; *pos_y_h[n] = j * dy; To this: pos_x_h[n] = i * dx + (j % 2) * dx / 2.0; pos_y_h[n] = j * dy; If ...


3

Simplest solution is to use the dynamic array and call the .reserve method before doing any appends. Then it will preallocate the space and future appends will be cheap. void main() { MyStruct[] structs; structs.reserve(256); // prealloc memory foreach(id; 0 .. 256) structs ~= MyStruct(id); // won't reallocate } That's how I'd do it ...


2

make these changes, t_a = mean(10, input[0]); y_a = mean(10, input[1]); //calculate v (slope), Maybe use two loops with one nested? // i need to increment v1=0; v2=0; for(i=0; i< 10; i++) { v1+ = ( input[0][i] - t_a)*( input[1][i] - y_a); } for(i=0; i< 10; i++) { v2=v2+( input[0][i] - t_a)*( input[0][i] - t_a); } v=v1/v2; //use float or ...


2

If you define your main with the signature as int main(int argc, char *argv[]); then, here argv is an array of pointers to strings passed as command line arguments. Quoting the C99 standard section 5.1.2.2.1 - The parameters argc and argv and the strings pointed to by the argv array shall be modifiable by the program, and retain their last-stored ...


2

So what you basically want is to parse a const char* to retrieve a integer number inside it, and ignore all whitespace(+others?) characters. Remember that characters like '1' or 'M' or even ' ' are just integers, mapped to the ASCII table. So you can easily convert a character from its notation human-readable ('a') to its value in memory. There are plenty ...


2

Off the top of my head, the easiest most elegant thing you could do is just make your bar function a template. template <class T> void Tbar( T param ) { char c12 = param[1][2]; // (for example) } Of course at that point you lose the ability to enforce that it be of size [3]. So you could do something like hide the template implementation ...


2

Sure you can... Just declare an array of pointers. Then you can use malloc and realloc to modify the subarray stored at each element. struct reading * data[num_sensors]; But you're kinda talking about both the dimensions being dynamic. You might need: struct reading ** data = malloc(sizeof(struct reading*) * num_sensors);


2

Can i set an array as [fixed][dynamic]? Yes. You could achieve this by doing something likes int *arr[fixed]; for (i = 0; i < fixed; i++) { arr[i] = malloc(length(i) * sizeof(int)); } that length(i) will return the length of arr[i].


2

You can do typedef struct { token* tokens; } template; t.tokens = malloc(sizeof(token)*20); token* tokens[20] will give you an array of 20 pointers to tokens. This would useful when you want 20 lists of tokens. But from your question I assume, that you only want one list ok tokens, so just use token* tokens. An alternative is: typedef struct { ...


1

You made a mistake in 2nd loop. obj is the array and prop is the index for (var key in myObject) { var obj = myObject[key]; for (var prop in obj) { //this will print the first value of the array console.log(obj[prop]); //obj is the array and prop is the index } }


1

Iterating an object with for..in is okay, but not an array. Because when you sue for..in with an array, it will not get the array values, but the array indices. So, you should be doing something like this for (var key in myObject) { var currentArray = myObject[key]; for(var i = 0; i < currentArray.length; i += 1) { ...


1

This: public static string resulttext { get { return resulttext; } } gives you an “infinite loop” because it is recursive; return resulttext calls public static string resulttext. Do this: public static string ResultText { get; private set; }


1

double *pos_x_h[224]; double *pos_y_h[224]; are arrays of pointers, but you use them wihtout allocating memory *pos_x_h[n] = i * dx + (j % 2) * dx / 2.0; *pos_y_h[n] = j * dy; probably something like that pos_x_h[n] = malloc(sizeof(double)); *pos_x_h[n] = i * dx + (j % 2) * dx / 2.0; pos_y_h[n] = malloc(sizeof(double)); *pos_y_h[n] = j * dy; ...


1

With traditional C, you can only have the array[][] structure for multiple dimension arrays work with compile time constant values. Otherwise, the pointer arithmetic is not correct. For dynamically sized multi dimensional arrays (those where rows and cols are determined at runtime), you need to do additional pointer arithmetic of this type: int *a; int ...


1

I wont give you the answer to your question or to your assignment, but something I think you will need a lot more at the moment: it seems you haven't really got a grasp on array manipulation. I'll try explain what your code is doing, so then you can modify / write / debug this and other code. //grab 1st row of the array for(i=0; input[0][i] ; i++) { ...


1

The common method to use dynamic matrices is to use a pointer to pointer to something, and then allocate both "dimensions" dynamically: int **arr = malloc(sizeof(*arr) * rows); for (int i = 0; i < rows; ++i) arr[i] = malloc(sizeof(**arr) * col); Remember that to free the matrix, you have to free all "rows" in a loop first.


1

Threads copy their arguments, so your threads never change the C. If you want a reference explicitly, you have to wrap it with std::ref (or std::cref for constant references): void f1(Case1& passedObj, int age, int index) { passedObj.addToAges(age, index); } void main(){ Case1 C; thread t1(f1, std::ref(C), 13, 0); t1.join(); ...


1

In this way is very difficult to find the bug. There could be multiple elements that makes your program crash, like the malloc(nCap * sizeof(Element)) that can return null on error, or free(v->elems); if v->elems is statically allocated or if null. We don't know what is v->lg... Try to debug with gdb or valgrind.


1

You have several problems. For a start: You do not need to malloc() a completely new array then copy things in. Just shuffle down the ones above the element you are deleting using memmove, then realloc to shrink the allocated memory. Your loop increments i twice, once in the for loop, and once in the else clause. There seems to be some confusion between ...


1

You may want to consider the following commented compilable C code. Instead of writing some notes here, I've inserted several comments inline in the code, to try to clearly explain what the code is doing. #include <stdio.h> /* For printf and file management */ #include <stdlib.h> /* For dynamic memory allocation */ #include ...


1

Key-Value pairs can be created with JavaScript Objects, with Object lietral, like this {key: value} Arrays can be created with Array literal ([]) or with Array constructor like this new Array(size); You can use both of them, like this var array = []; array.push({key1: value1}); Since JavaScript arrays begin with index 0, you need to access the ...


1

Based on Nathan Monteleone's solution: template < typename T > void bar( T* param ) { static_assert( 3 == ( std::is_array< T >::value ? std::extent< T >::value : std::tuple_size< T >::value ), "param must have a size of 3" ); } I believe this solution is the best of all worlds, cause it avoids the reinterpret_cast that is ...


1

Here's a classic example of an XY problem. Your question has nothing at all to do with arrays, or even lists. The problem is how to get the list of options from the command-line arguments. For this you should be using argparse rather than trying to parse sys.argv manually.


1

If you want to remove the first occurrence only you can do something like that. I didn't test the code but it should be fine. bool IntegerDynamicArray::remove(int x) { for (int i = 0; i < currentSize; i++) { if (dynamicArray[i] == x) { for ( ; i < currentSize - 1; i++) { // Assign the ...


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The add function leaks memory because you did not deallocate dynamicArray before assigning it to the new block of memory. You should also provide a destructor. Use delete[] rather than delete since you are allocating an array. The conditional within remove does not appear to be correct. I would think that x indicates the element to remove, but you are ...


1

Your code seems to work fine (if you fix the different class name used in html vs script circulo_menu vs circle_menu) Demo at http://jsfiddle.net/7jbUj/ To add the whole circle append the whole element and not its text by using .append(this) $(".circle_menu").click(function() { $("#cont_seguim").append(this); }); Demo at ...


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unable to understand properly, hope below one can help you. <script type="text/javascript"> $(document).ready(function() { $(".circulo_menu").click(function() { var myText = $(this).html(); alert("calling " + myText); $("#cont_seguim").html(myText); }); }); </script> make sure ...


1

Assuming that Mar 10, 2014 6:40:45 AM is your input date format, This code will help: var myDate = new Date('Mar 10, 2014 6:40:45 AM'); var reqDate = ((myDate.getMonth() + 1) + "/" + myDate.getDate() + "/" + myDate.getFullYear()); console.log(reqDate); output 3/10/2014


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const char* bar[][3] is not const char** bar[3] but const char* (*bar)[3]. So you may want something like: class MyClass { public: MyClass() : bar(nullptr) {} void foo() { func(bar); } private: const char* (*bar)[3]; }; I suggest to use typedef as: class MyClass { public: typedef const char* bar_t[3]; public: MyClass() : bar(new ...



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