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58

Java uses static binding for overloaded methods, and dynamic binding for overridden ones. In your example, the equals method is overloaded (has a different param type than Object.equals()), so the method called is bound to the reference type at compile time. Some discussion here The fact that it is the equals method is not really relevant, other than it ...


21

Quite easy... You're doing it wrong, because by that event the control is not there: protected void gv_RowDataBound(object sender, GridViewRowEventArgs e) { if (e.Row.RowType == DataControlRowType.DataRow && (e.Row.RowState & DataControlRowState.Edit) == DataControlRowState.Edit) { // Here you will get the Control you ...


20

Your example is dynamic binding, because at run time it is determined what the type of a is, and the appropriate method is called. Now assume you have the following two methods as well: public static void callEat(Animal animal) { System.out.println("Animal is eating"); } public static void callEat(Dog dog) { System.out.println("Dog is eating"); } ...


18

The simple answer is if you intend functions of your class to be overridden for runtime polymorphism you should mark them as virtual, and not if you don't intend so. Don't mark your functions virtual just because you feel it imparts additional flexibility, rather think of your design and purpose of exposing an interface. For ex: If your class is not ...


17

Dynamic binding is not synonymous with dynamic typing. C is a strongly typed language and, in particular, the type of an argument or return value is critical and can significantly impact code generation. Properties are specifically designed to eliminate ambiguity. As a part of that, the decision was made to not allow the dot syntax to be used against id. ...


17

The equals method of Test does not override the equals method of java.lang.Object. Look at the parameter type! The Test class is overloading equals with a method that accepts a Test. If the equals method is intended to override, it should use the @Override annotation. This would cause a compilation error to point out this common mistake.


17

You are confusing the runtime and the compiler. The runtime has no problem coping with that. The issue is that dot notation (which is syntactic sugar) requires type information for the compiler to disambiguate between Objective-C objects and C structs. If you don't use dot notation it works: NSLog( @"%@ : %@\n", [exc name], [exc reason]) ; The above will ...


10

Conceptually, what is going on is that there is a dispatcher library (commonly referred to as the Objective C runtime), and the compiler converts something like this: [myObject myMethodWithArg:a andArg:b ]; into //Not exactly correct, but close enough for this objc_msgSend(myObject, "myMethodWithArg:andArg:", a, b); And then the runtime deals with all ...


10

Do not call pure virtual functions from constructor as it results in Undefined Behavior. C++03 10.4/6 states "Member functions can be called from a constructor (or destructor) of an abstract class; the effect of making a virtual call (10.3) to a pure virtual function directly or indirectly for the object being created (or destroyed) from such a ...


7

I use bindings for two reasons: running tests that override constants or other values of other symbols using "global" resources such as database connections or message broker channels testing I am working on a distributed system with several components that communicate by sending messages over message exchanges. These exchanges have global names, which ...


6

Spring form tags has a checkboxes tag. You can use it as follows to do the binding automatically: <form:checkboxes items="${faxStatusList}" path="faxStatusList" itemLabel="name" itemValue="id" delimiter="<br/>" onclick="yourOnClickMethodIfYouNeed(this);"/> The above snippet will display a list of checkbox items delimited with the br tag. Any ...


6

For most events you can use live() (jQuery 1.3+): $("td").live("click", function() { // do stuff }); This will bind a click event to <td> elements that come into existence after you run this code as well. This is a much cleaner solution than trying to bind/unbind and ensure you don't have the same event bound twice to a particular element.


6

They're not entirely identical, but they are both dictionary lookups, as can be shown with the disassembler dis.dis. In particular, note the LOAD_ATTR instruction with dynamically looks up the attribute by name. According to the docs, it "replaces TOS [top of stack] with getattr(TOS, co_names[namei])". >>> from dis import dis >>> ...


6

You didn't quite specify your question, but I suppose that you want to load the function dynamically based on the OS version. To determine the OS version, you can use GetVersionEx. To load a function dynamically, first use LoadLibrary to retrieve the module handle of its DLL, and then use GetProcAddress to retrieve a function pointer to the function. You ...


6

A selector represents a method name, not a method signature. In the following example: - (void)someMethod:(int)intParam; - (id)someMethod:(float)floatParam; both methods have the same name (someMethod:) and, consequently, the same selector: @selector(someMethod:). Suppose you’ve declared the first method in a class called Foo and the second method in a ...


6

You haven’t noticed anything unusual because those two methods have the same call semantics under, for example, the x86_64 ABI. Pointers can be considered integers and, under the x86_64 ABI, they are passed to the target method in the same manner. However, if you had another class, e.g.: @implementation C - (int)add:(float)number { return (int)number + ...


6

From the NEWS for Emacs 24: Lisp changes in Emacs 24.1 Code can now use lexical scoping by default instead of dynamic scoping. The lexical-binding variable enables lexical scoping for local variables. It is typically set via a file-local variable in the first line of the file, in which case it applies to all the code in that file. ...


6

New vars are temporarily created by with-local-vars. Existing vars are temporarily rebound by with-bindings. In both cases the bindings are thread-local. Note that with-bindings is, as far as I can tell, primarily useful as a helper to pass bindings from another context by using a map returned by get-thread-bindings. The similar function binding would be ...


5

For the standard binaries which return something the return type is almost always object (get, set, operations, etc...). Otherwise it's void for the standard bindings (e.g. DeleteMember). You can also get the expected return type at runtime from the ReturnType property on the incoming binder.


5

Interestingly enough, in Groovy code (which could be compiled to a class file), all but one of the calls would execute the print statement. (The one comparing a Test to an Object clearly won't call the Test.equals(Test) function.) This is because groovy DOES do completely dynamic typing. This is particularly of interest because it does not have any ...


5

Java does not support co-variance in parameters, only in return types. In other words, while your return type in an overriding method may be a subtype of what it was in the overridden, that is not true for parameters. If your parameter for equals in Object is Object, putting an equals with anything else in a subclass will be an overloaded, not an ...


5

Answers No. This is much closer to dynamic dispatch than dynamic binding. Dynamic binding refers to the way in which a named method is bound at runtime. There is no name here. Yes. If the methods are virtual then this is the definition of dynamic binding. The name is known at compile time but the method called cannot be determined without knowing the ...


5

RTTI means additional information is included in the compiler output so that runtime code can know details about the source code classes and types that would normally be thrown away in compilation. For example, the machine code doesn't need to know the name of a function in order to call a function - calling a function in machine code only needs to know ...


5

Are there any general results / comparative studies of these paradigms? from what i have seen, many examples of proofs can be found in articles and publications. your favorite c++ books should provide several demonstrations; if you have no such resource, you may want to read Modern C++ Design: Generic Programming and Design Patterns Applied - A. ...


5

Your static array with dynamic size (called a variable length array, short VLA) only works thanks to a language extension in your compiler. It's a C99 thing, which isn't contained in the C++ standard, meaning it won't be portable. The other obvious difference is that you can pass the pointer to the dynamic array somewhere else, save it somewhere, return it ...


5

It's not possible in Java. You can use super but it always uses the method in immediate superclass in type hierarchy. Also note that this: Foo f = (Foo) this; f.fn(); is the very definition of polymoprhism how virtual call works: even though f is of type Foo, but at runtime f.fn() is dispatched to Bar.fn(). Compile-time type doesn't matter.


5

In class C, the method WhoAreYou() doesn't override the base class method, as it is defined with new keyword which adds a new method with the same name which hides the base class method. That is why this: C c = new D(); c.WhoAreYou();// "I am a D" invokes the overridden method in D which overrides its base class method defined with new keyword. However, ...


5

The object a is still of type A. The assignment only copies data from b, it doesn't make a a B object. This is called object slicing.


5

<?php class A { static function test() { return get_called_class(); } } class B extends A { } echo B::test(); Requires PHP >= 5.3.0. See PHP's manual entry on Late Static Bindings


5

Scala is statically typed. An arbitrary animal cannot eat grass, and you have just tried to feed grass to an arbitrary animal. It happens to be a cow, but you have stated (with : Animal) that the compiler may only assume that it is an animal. If you allow the compiler to know that bessy is a Cow (val bessy = new Cow), then she'll eat grass just fine.



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