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3

First of all you are not creating instance of class Token called test but rather declare a function test() that returns Token. Second you can try to convert pointer to Token, not object instance, so you should take address: void test() { Token test; Actor* check = dynamic_cast<Actor*>(&test); } Third, you say that Actor inherits from ...


1

The error means that you said as and lied. So: ceva = self.storyboard.instantiateViewControllerWithIdentifier("Agenda") as myAgendaTableViewController So you are saying as myAgendaTableViewController, but this object is not a myAgendaTableViewController.


0

If you're getting this issue check to make sure you have assigned the class to the viewcontroller. Go to the storyboard and select your viewcontroller, then under the identity inspector panel make sure you have assigned the proper name of your class to your viewcontroller.


0

I was having this problem. There's something going wrong in prepareForSegue. Instead, I just instantiated and pushed the view controller myself: let controller = self.storyboard?.instantiateViewControllerWithIdentifier("Identifier") as MyViewController self.navigationController?.pushViewController(controller, animated: true)


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One very important point: once an object is constructed, its type is fixed, and can never be changed, regardless. If Base has a member named basetype, that object is constructed by the constructor of Base, before any derived class can access it, and the type of that object is what is declared to be in Base, and can never be changed. You can use dynamic_cast ...


2

You can't change the type of the member basetype, whether by using dynamic_cast or any other means. If your boss told you to do it, they're either very wrong or didn't communicate clearly enough what you should do. I would recommend that you ask for clarification. One common way to implement this (i.e. a member whose type depends on a subclass) is by ...


0

Hope this makes the issue a little clearer for you. #include <iostream> struct Base { virtual Base& foo() = 0; }; struct Derived : Base { virtual Derived& foo() { std::cout << "Came to Derived::foo()\n"; return *this; } void bar() { std::cout << "Came to Derived::bar()\n"; } }; int main() ...


1

You could create a suitable overload in your derived class which dispatches to the base class version but return an object of itself: class workerA { // ... workerA& Start() { this->AsyncWorker::Start(); return *this; } workerA& Detach() { this->AsyncWorker::Detach(); return *this; } // ...


2

The line der x = dynamic_cast<der&>(b); constructs an object of type der and initializes it with dynamic_cast<der&>(b) The line der& y = dynamic_cast<der&>(b); just initializes a reference. x.method(); calls method() on the separately constructed object. y.method(); calls method() on the object y references, ...


0

I was getting following error: swift_dynamicCastClassUnconditional Swift dynamic cast failed Problem code: I was using CredentialsSetting ViewController every time when connect to different segue // programming mark ----- ----- ---- ----- ----- ---- ----- ----- ---- override func prepareForSegue(segue: UIStoryboardSegue, sender: AnyObject!) { ...


2

For this code: void func(Abstract1* a1) { Abstract2* a2 = dynamic_cast<Abstract2*>(a1); ... } You're asking: If a1 is pointing to a Foo object, will the dynamic-cast return a valid object pointer? The answer is yes: During runtime, the dynamic-cast will identify the V-Table of a1 as the V-Table of class Foo. Since class Foo inherits from ...


1

Well, you could simply have tried it! #include <cassert> struct IBase1 { virtual void foo() = 0; virtual ~IBase1() {} }; struct IBase2 { virtual void bar() = 0; virtual ~IBase2() {} }; struct Derived : IBase1, IBase2 { void foo() {} void bar() {} }; int main() { Derived d; IBase1* ptr = &d; ...


6

What you describe is a so-called cross-cast. For dynamic_cast<T>(v), the standard specifies in [expr.dynamic.cast]/8 If C is the class type to which T points or refers, the run-time check logically executes as follows: If, in the most derived object pointed (referred) to by v, v points (refers) to a public base class subobject of a C ...


4

Yes it will work. dynamic_cast is based on RTTI. The information provided by RTTI here is enough to determine the actual dynamic type of the pointed to object. By definition, RTTI is a run time notion, as is the dynamic type of the pointed to object (the fact that Foo's definition is not available in a compilation unit where said cast is written is a ...



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