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14

To answer your questions one by one: Dynamic linking defers part of the linking process to runtime. It can be used in two ways: implicitly and explicitly. Implicitly, the static linker will insert information into the executable which will cause the library to load and resolve the necessary symbols. Explicitly, you must call LoadLibrary or dlopen ...


14

You are linking to libraries when you link with g++ main.o -o program. A few libraries are auto-linked by default, and the only way to not link to them is to pass -nodefaultlibs (or equivalent). In particular, you'll find cout in libstdc++, which in turn uses libc. Both of those are linked by default. If you have ldd installed, you can verify this by ...


11

The .lib file on Windows is not required for loading a dynamic library, it merely offers a convenient way of doing so. In principle, you can use LoadLibrary for loading the dll and then use GetProcAddress for accessing functions provided by that dll. The compilation of the enclosing program does not need to access the dll in that case, it is only needed at ...


9

There is no problem with dynamically linked libraries. They are not dangerous. However, you are demonstrating the problem of unloading dynamically loaded libraries. You can't unload a library and then continue to use references to data in that library: data pointers, function pointers, virtual functions, et cetera. It is just like using a pointer after ...


7

std::cout is defined in GCC's own C++ standard library, which g++ links to by default, and it only depends on standard C I/O facilities such as FILE* and basic file I/O, which are provided in libc, which gcc and g++ also link to by default. So everything you need to use std::cout is linked to by default. Functions such as pthread_create are not part of the ...


6

How does dynamic linking work generally? The dynamic link library (aka shared object) file contains machine code instructions and data, along with a table of metadata saying which offsets in that code/data relate to which "symbols", the type of the symbol (e.g. function vs data), the number of bytes or words in the data, and a few other things. ...


5

Seems like I've figured out what you can do I used NSClassFromString() to check if class is available on device, i.e. if NSClassFromString("UIBlurEffect") { let blur = UIBlurEffect(...) //... } else { //... } It's needed to make UIKit.framework (or another corresponding framework) optional. If you create Swift-based application in ...


5

The fact that the destructor is virtual isn't really relevant here, because there's no inheritance involved. The problem is simply that you're calling a function (the destructor) that's implemented in a library after you've closed that library. A direct call to a non-virtual member function would cause the same problem, because the function's code is in ...


5

Your analysis is incorrect. The problem is not that the after dlclose(handle) the code for your destructor doesn't exist any longer, which means that your code crashes. Keep the library open, and the destructor can be called. However, you do in some cases also get a different heap per shared library, so it's a good idea to keep the construction and ...


5

I was told that this setup allows the shared libraries to be unloaded from memory when not in active use. Is this correct? In a sense, yes. The kernel memory manager takes care of this if memory pressure gets high. Read-only sections (such as the code) can simply be dropped from memory and loaded back on demand from the original file when it's needed ...


4

Well I forgot to put BOOST_ALL_DYN_LINK in preprocessor definition. If the BOOST_ALL_DYN_LINK is not defined, boost looks for static library, that is why its looking for libboost_thread-vc100-mt-gd-1_55.lib


4

Let's say we are talking about libtest. If you look around, you'll see libtest.so, which is a link to libtest.so.1, which in turn links to libtest.so.1.5. An executable using libtest will link against libtest.so.1 in this case (this is written into the executable, see ldd(1)). If your distribution changes libtest to fix bugs, the new version might give ...


4

The ldd command doesn't do what you think it does. The ldd command shows you all the library dependencies, both direct and indirect, that a program or library has. So it will show libGL.so.1, which you use directly, and libnvidia-tls.so.331.62, which you use indirectly. The readelf -d command will show you only the libraries your program uses directly: ...


4

Static libraries mean that instead of your executable linking to external library files (on Windows they are DLLs), they are now lumped into your actual executable. This is a good thing if there are reasons you don't want to distribute DLLs separately, but it also completely wastes the benefits of DLLs such as being able to swap them out individually instead ...


4

Store the library path in the DT_RPATH tag of your executable when linking -Wl,rpath=/lib1 -Wl,rpath=/lib2 -Wl,rpath=/lib3 that way you don't need to mess with LD_LIBRARY_PATH and shell initialization.


4

No, you cannot use LD_PRELOAD to override the main function of a binary. LD_PRELOAD A whitespace-separated list of additional, user-specified, ELF shared libraries to be loaded before all others. This can be used to selectively override functions in other shared libraries. For setuid/setgid ELF ...


3

To load a module like FindFreetype.cmake you need to use it in cmake with the find_package-command. The first argument is the package name. The "Find" of its corresponding filename is added automatically by cmake. While include might work with find_package you can add some flags. For example, as shown below, REQUIRED, to make cmake fail when freetype wasn't ...


3

Use LD_DEBUG. try this: LD_DEBUG=statistics ./myprog It'll output a short list of various statistics. An example: xenon-lornix:~> LD_DEBUG=statistics ls 22833: 22833: runtime linker statistics: 22833: total startup time in dynamic loader: 2500702 clock cycles 22833: time needed for relocation: 757822 ...


3

when building gcc and g++ you may specify "default libraries" to link with. In some pre-built distribution they are kind enough to do -lstdc++ for you, some distribution don't.


3

When you compile your program with -lsomelibrary, the compiler will search for libsomelibrary.so in your system, which will be linked to something like libsomelibrary.so.x.y From now on, your software is tied to that particular major version (that x in the name). This means that it will only work with the x series library. If the distribution ships a newer ...


3

Unfortunately, the authoritative documentation is the source code. Most distributions of Linux use glibc or its fork, eglibc. In the source code for both, the file that should document dlopen() reads as follows: manual/libdl.texi @c FIXME these are undocumented: @c dladdr @c dladdr1 @c dlclose @c dlerror @c dlinfo @c dlmopen @c dlopen @c dlsym @c dlvsym ...


3

In a nutshell: because native code is hard. If you want to host binaries for arbitrary systems, you have to match the binaries to each system you want to run on. That may mean compiling dozens of sets of binaries to support all of the systems the code will compile on. On the other hand, you may well find that someone has compiled the code you need: your ...


3

In short, it is impossible to unload the code. Of course, you can take precautions and unload any data structures, that was created by your module as a side-effect, as soon as they are no longer needed. But code can't be removed, since it is is stored in the code fragments table, that is never freed. If you want to dynamically evaluate code, then I would ...


3

You should think of writing a plugin container (or a sand-box), then coordinate everything through the container, also make sure to drop privileges that you do not need inside the container process before running the plugin. Being run in a process means, you can run the container also as a unique user and not the one who started the process, after that you ...


2

Your last assumption is wrong, you cannot accidentally share data between libraries. How this is achieved is specific to each library format and operating system, but the main idea is simple: code is read-only: it can be shared safely (think int rand() { return 4; }) constants are read-only: they can be shared safely (think "Hello, World!") variables are ...


2

RTLD_LAZY actually means resolve symbols lazily, not load libraries lazily. fun5.so depends on both of these libraries so they will be loaded when fun5.so is loaded. The line: gcc -shared -o fun5.so fun5.o ./fun1.so ./fun2.so tells us that fun5.so explicitly depends on fun1.so and fun2.so, which is why you're seeing this behaviour.


2

Probably you need to specify to the linker to export the symbols as dynamic. With gcc you have to use -rdynamic. You can check the exported dynamic symbols with objdump -T.


2

You can use a DLL file in Windows in two ways: Either you link with it, and you're done, nothing more to do. Or you load it dynamically during run-time. If you link with it, then the DLL library file is used. The link-library contains information that the linker uses to actually know which DLL to load and where in the DLL functions are, so it can call them. ...


2

Relatedly, on OS X (and I assume *nix... dlopen), you don't need a lib file... How how does the compiler know that the methods described in the header will be available at runtime? Compilers or linkers do not need such information. You, the programmer, need to handle the situation that the shared libraries you try to open by dlopen() may not exist.


2

Try something like void *uikit = dlopen("path_to_dylib", RTLD_LAZY); id (*FunctionName)(id) = dlsym(uikit, "FunctionName"); FunctionName(arg1); dlclose(uikit); For more information you can read about dynamic loading here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dynamic_loading



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