Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

5

I guess this can save you some trouble: class RGB { public: RGB(int r, int g, int b) { colors[0] = r; colors[1] = g; colors[2] = b; } int operator[](uint index) { // you can check index is not exceeding 2, if you want return colors[index]; } int getColor(uint index) { // you ...


3

There are at least two ways to dynamically allocate a 2D array. The first one is the one of @HRoid : each row is allocated one at a time. Look here for getting an scheme. The second one is suggested by @Claris, and it will ensure that the data is contiguous in memory. This is required by many MPI operations...it is also required by libraries like FFTW (2D ...


3

No!! If realloc succeeds, the old pointer (unless it was a nullpointer) is indeterminate. Also, do not mix incompatible memory-management-functions (assume incompatibility unless guaranteed otherwise). realloc only has the guarantees explicitly given in the standard: If return-value is non-0: New pointer points to of at least size byte, the first ...


2

How can i make sure the memory is deleted at the end of the "getColor()" function use? You can do that by capturing the result of the call and calling delete[] on it. This solution works, but it has problems that can be avoided. Solution 1: RGB test(50, 100, 150); int *values = test.getColor(); // store result in variable here green = values[1]; ...


2

Try compiling the program with AddressSanitizer. You will get an error every time something writes past the allocated buffer.


2

This line int** C = (int**) calloc(n, sizeof(int *)); is declaring a new (local) variable and initializing it. To set the value of the member variable, just remove the declaration bit: C = (int**) calloc(n, sizeof(int *));


2

When you say: temp->variable2 = newToken; you are pointing temp->variable2 somewhere in the middle of whatever you first passed to strtok() -- that is likely something that is going to be overwritten. You probably want to make a copy of it: temp->variable2 = strdup(newToken); This is one reason some people feel strtok() is fraught with peril. ...


2

The canonical way of reading multiple lines of input in C is to use fgets in a loop, like while (fgets(arr, sizeof(arr), stdin) != NULL) { if (arr_contains_special_input_to_exit_loop(arr)) break; // Optionally check for and remove trailing newline from input // Append `arr` to your data } The condition to exit the loop might be some ...


2

C99 draft 7.20.3.4 says: [#4] The realloc function returns a pointer to the new object (which may have the same value as a pointer to the old object), or a null pointer if the new object could not be allocated. You should not assume it. And also: don't mix new and realloc as πάντα already wrote in ...


2

You're not returning a local variable; you're returning the value stored in a local variable. This code is fine (although the cast on malloc is unnecessary); it's a somewhat common pattern to allocate memory in one function and free it in another.


1

Although I agree with the other answers in that you should not depend on it, there is an answer to be found in the glibc source. (I am assuming that you are using glibc, as you have not (yet) answered my comment asking which C library you are using) EDIT: Using realloc on memory allocated by new is indeed disallowed, as other answers have mentioned. Memory ...


1

Firstly, do not ever manage your own memory in C++. You can simply use std::vector<std::vector<int>> to manage it for you, which actually has a chance in hell of being correct. Secondly, in the constructor, C is a local variable, so it cannot possibly have the same address as any other variable existing at the same time.


1

This code looks awfully suspect. a = (int **)malloc(rows*sizeof(int)); for(i=0; i<rows; i++) a[i] = (int *)malloc(width*sizeof(int)); MPI_Recv(&a, rows*width, MPI_INT, 0, 1, MPI_COMM_WORLD, &status); Your creating an array of int** and allocating correctly but then you don't pass the individual pointers. MPI_Recv expects int* as an ...


1

Since it's not an object i can't delete anything inside the RGB's class destructor. Not being an object is not the issue. C-style arrays that have been allocated with new[] are freed with delete[]. But you should not free it in RGB's destructor, because you've passed it outside the object and it might still be used. You can free the memory with your ...


1

One mistake is: for(i=0;i<(strlen(arr));++i){ if(arr[i]=='\n') break; } Looking earlier in you code you have: scanf(" %[^\n]s " ,arr); The [^\n] prevents any newlines \n from being contained in arr. So your loop that looks for (arr[i]=='\n') will never find any. Your next bit of code continues looking for non-existent newlines: ...


1

You can use MAP container to do that. The ideia is that you have 2 values. The first one is the playerID and the second one, a dynamic memory reference, which contains its properties. Following is a simple example to prove the concept. #include <map> #include <memory> #include <iostream> int main() { std::map<int, ...


1

It sounds like you have corruption of heap memory. This can take many forms. It might be as simple as a buffer overrun because of an off-by-one error, and the extra allocation protects you from that. But it could be almost any kind of memory error, like a stray write through an invalid pointer, use after free, double-free, etc. The bug may be in your ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible