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32

While smart pointers are preferable to raw pointers in many cases, there are still lots of use-cases for new/delete in C++14. If you need to write anything that requires in-place construction, for example: a memory pool an allocator a tagged variant binary messages to a buffer you will need to use placement new and, possibly, delete. No way around ...


19

It depends on the implementation. I can tell you the way I usually do it: 1) The new handler allocates a large amount of memory at startup as a reserve. 2) When ordinary allocations fail, the new handler dips into its reserve. 3) Code that controls load management can hook the memory management system and determine when it has dipped into its reserve. It ...


10

Yes, it allocates some memory, but the amount varies depending on the JVM implementation. You need to somehow represent: A unique pointer (so that the array is != every other new int[0]), so at least 1 byte Class pointer (for Object.getClass()) Hash code (for System.identityHashCode) Object monitor (for synchronized (Object)) Array length The JVM might ...


9

The operator<< of output streams has an overload to char* that interprets the character array as a string instead of a generic pointer. Thus, it prints the value of the string. Use static_cast<void*>(pvalue2) to print the address. Dereferencing the string gives you a char, which is not a string. If you are using C++, prefer using std::string ...


8

You should be passing str1, not &str1, to scanf(). scanf() expects a char * for the "%s" format; you pass the address of a char *. This does not lead to happiness. Since BUF_SIZE is so small — just 10, you say — you need to use: if (scanf("%9s", str1) != 1) …process error or EOF… This will protect you against buffer overflow. You should ...


8

Your program doesn't crash because you are lucky (or unlucky, thanks @user1320881, since you may not detect such things in more complicated code, and some later crashes or nasty side effects may happen). In fact, what you have here is undefined behaviour, and anything can happen (not necessarily a crash). Technically, your program doesn't crash probably ...


7

You're calling free_matrix twice for a and twice for b. For a you allocate memory first and then free it, in that order you do these operations twice; however, for b you allocate then release and then without allocating again, you try to release, which leads to the crash. Calling free to free the memory allocated, doesn't set the pointer pointing to it to ...


7

It can discard data that is not really needed. Say, photoshop caches the display image at several scales, and keeps as much as it can. This is how it knows just how much it can get away with.


7

It depends on how your Linux system is configured. Here's a simple C program that tries to allocate 1TB of memory and touches some of it. #include <stdlib.h> #include <stdio.h> #include <unistd.h> int main() { char *array[1000]; int i; for (i = 0; i < 1000; ++i) { if (NULL == (array[i] = malloc((int) 1e9))) { ...


7

Here I am allocating memory to s dynamically while defining and then initializing it to NULL. No, you're not. By doing struct something* s = malloc(sizeof(struct something)); s = NULL; You're essentially discarding the only pointer to the memory (by setting it to NULL) allocated by malloc(). You're leaking memory here. If you want to initalize the ...


7

It should be *(*str+i) instead of **(str+i). You have allocated memory to *str pointer.


7

It is a relatively common choice to use make_unique and make_shared rather than raw calls to new. It is not, however, mandatory. Assuming you choose to follow that convention, there are a few places to use new. First, non-custom placement new (I'll neglect the "non-custom" part, and just call it placement new) is a completely different card game than ...


6

blk->addr = &blk; The address of the allocated memory actually is blk itself. But here, you are using &blk, i.e, the address of blk.


6

VarArray[Variables.length() + 1] = NULL; accesses memory you do not own since this array is allocated thus: VarArray = new char[Variables.length()]; The final element in this array has index Variables.length() - 1. Running this in a debugger ought be be instructive. Some static analysis tools (eg. lint) would highlight this misuse, I believe. You could ...


6

strcpy(p[i],lineBuf); i is never initialized in first code snippet


6

This doesn't work because you don't actually construct a Node instance into the memory which you malloc. You should use new instead: Node *n = new Node{}; malloc only allocates memory, it has no idea what a class is or how to instantiate one. You should generally not use it in C++. new allocates memory and constructs an instance of the class.


6

Will this cause memory leak if I don't call free() inside free_or_not()? Yes, it will cause memory leak. Once your function finishes execution, you don't have any pointers to the allocated memory to free() it. Solution: If you change the return type of your function to void * (or similar) and return the allocated pointer (ip)from the function, then, ...


6

Why does the pointer pvalue2 give the "pointed-to" string literal instead of the memory address? Because there's a special overload of << so that streaming char* will give the string it points to, not the pointer value. That's usually what you want to happen. Isn't a "pointer value" always the memory address which it points to? Yes. Why ...


6

What is the wrong with this code? Ans: First of all you change that "is" to "are", there are two major problems, atleast. Let me elaborate. Point 1. You allocate memory to the pointer, not to the value of pointer. FWIW, using *c (i.e., de-referencing the pointer without memory allocation) is invalid and will result in undefined behaviour. Point 2. ...


5

Others have already pointed out std::vector. Here's roughly how code using it could look: #include <vector> #include <iostream> struct point { double x; double y; friend std::istream &operator>>(std::istream &is, point &p) { return is >> p.x >> p.y; } friend std::ostream ...


5

In C, you may do: int compareFirstWord(const char* sentence, const char* compareWord) { while (*compareWord != '\0' && *sentence == *compareWord) { ++sentence; ++compareWord; } if (*compareWord == '\0' && (*sentence == '\0' || *sentence == ' ')) { return 0; } return *sentence < *compareWord ? -1 ...


5

I guess this can save you some trouble: class RGB { public: RGB(int r, int g, int b) { colors[0] = r; colors[1] = g; colors[2] = b; } int operator[](uint index) { // you can check index is not exceeding 2, if you want return colors[index]; } int getColor(uint index) { // you ...


5

I would rewrite push_back as follows: void push_back(const T &e) { if (currentSize+1 > arraySize) { arraySize *= 4; T * temp = new T[arraySize]; for (int i = 0; i < currentSize; i++) { temp[i] = Tarray[i]; } delete[] Tarray; Tarray = temp; } Tarray[currentSize] = e; ...


5

For every malloc you need one free. Nothing is done "automatically" for you. Note that, contrary to your claim, you do not actually have to allocate any memory for bars, just as you don't have to allocate memory for numBars. However, you are allocating memory for *bars. A single star can make a big difference in C...


5

Your first overload must be in form: int operator() (int row, int col) const Not const int operator() (int row, int col) And it is not the read operation, it is used when an object of your type is created as const, this overload will be used, if not const, other overload will be used, both for reading and writing.


5

when you are declaring static variables in C Not related to this question, or atleast to the code you've shown. but what does *c do? Assuming your question related to the statement *c = *&c[3];, it refers to the object at address held by c. why did you have to cast (int *) in front of malloc? You should not. Please do not cast the return ...


5

Let's look at the two cases. Case 1: Before malloc Well, there's almost no harm done here. Unless the pointer was pointing to something before, the pointer is simply set to NULL and points to nothing. Calling free() on a pointer that points to nothing does nothing. "Free the people?" Okay. "Free the free?" You can't really free something that's already ...


5

malloc and realloc require the number of bytes as argument. However you are writing code like: char** words; words = (char **) malloc(20); for(i = 0; i<20; i++){ words[i] = (char*) malloc(120); You allocate 20 bytes but then you write 20 pointers (which probably takes 80 bytes). To fix this you need to compute how many bytes are required to store ...


5

OutboundData is given address @0x1fca, so only 12 between Why you're interested in the address of OutboundData? After malloc(), you should be checking the value of OutboundData, however, you won't be knowing the size of allocated memory thr' this. Just to be clear, you're not copying to the address of OutboundData, rather , you are copying to the ...


5

"free() can also be used to release that memory space." No, free() cannot be used to release memory allocated with new() or new[]. "So which type of problems will I have to face when releasing memory using free() in place of delete[]?" Using free() instead of delete[] for memory allocated with new[] is undefined behavior (besides destructor ...



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