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11

What does this code segment do? It elaborately rapes common C++ programming idioms and systematically undermines the security of your code. It does so by needlessly resorting to raw pointers instead of using a standard container object such as std::vector. Okay, is the first line a pointer to an array? No, a pointer to array looks like this: int ...


8

Just don't call free() on your original ptr in the happy path. Essentially realloc() has done that for you. ptr=(int*)malloc(sizeof(int)); ptr1=(int*)realloc(ptr,count*sizeof(int)); if(ptr1==NULL) //reallocated pointer ptr1 { printf("\nExiting!!"); free(ptr); exit(0); } else { ptr=ptr1; // th reallocation succeeded, ...


6

The line if (!str) return str; basically means if (str == NULL) return NULL; which is just error checking the return value of realloc. The reason we make ch an int is because the function fgetc returns an int (that is how we can have EOF be returned yet EOF isn't a legal char value). The size argument simply represents the initial size of the buffer that ...


6

If you want to reassign what the pointer points to in C, you have to use int**, ie a pointer to a pointer. That is because pointers are copied by value as arguments, so if want the change made in the pointers pointee to be visible outside the scope of the function, you need another level of indirection.


6

In embedded systems you have very limited memory. Therefore, if you occasionally lose only one byte of memory (because you allocate it , but you dont free it), this will eat up the system memory pretty quickly (1 GByte of RAM, with a leak rate of 1/hour will take its time. If you have 4kB RAM, not as long) Essentially the behaviour of avoiding dynamic ...


6

You're comparing apples and oranges. malloc() and calloc() allocate memory. new allocates memory, via a possibly over-ridden operator, and calls a constructor. They do different things. Comparing them isn't valid. The fact that 'a C++ compiler is being used to compile the program' is (a) obvious and (b) irrelevant.


5

You have a beginners mistake here, in that you pass the pointer g from main by-value. That means that in the reservation_en_memoire function you are only allocating memory to a copy of the pointer, a copy which disappears when the function returns (but the memory the pointer points to will not be unallocated, so you have a memory leak). When you then access ...


5

strncpy always pads up to the end of the buffer, so this line: strncpy(var, "abcdefghi",1000000 ); causes the segfault. As you can read here The remainder of the buffer is filled with \0.


5

Your Student Class is missing a copy assignment Operator, in absence of which, the default assignment operator provided only does a shallow copy. When you create the student object and push in onto Group, both the student object and the one Group holds in its array has the same reference to the firstName and lastName array in absence of an assignment ...


5

In C you cannot copy around blocks of memory as you tried to do: str = "Hello"; That is not a valid string copy; instead, it leaves your malloc'd memory unaccounted for ("leaked"), and changes the pointer 'str' to point to a hard-coded string. Further, because str is now a pointer to a hard-coded, static string, you cannot realloc it. It was never ...


5

value+1 is a char* that represent the string with the first character removed. It is the less expensive way to obtain such a string.. You'll have to be careful when freeing memory though to make sure to free the original pointer and not the shifted one.


5

You call the realloc function with the matrix pointer when it should be matrix[i][j]: matrix[i][j] = realloc(matrix[i][j], sizeof(char)* 11); Or, if you want to protect yourself against failures: char *temp = realloc(matrix[i][j], sizeof(char)* 11); if (temp != NULL) matrix[i][j] = temp; Note: Don't cast the return of malloc (or realloc) in C.


5

void arrSelectSort(int *[], int) The first parameter is of type int**. You call the function like this: arrSelectSort(arrPtr, 3); where arrPtr is of type int*. This is the type mismatch that the compiler is informing your of. I think that the error is in the declaration of arrSelectSort. It should be: void arrSelectSort(int[], int) The first ...


5

s->marks is a pointer to the first element of an array of double. s->marks + i is a pointer to the ith element. *(s->marks + i) dereferences that to give the double element itself. s->marks[i] is a convenient way to write *(s->marks + i). It includes the dereference operation, so there's no need for another one.


5

In C, you may do: int compareFirstWord(const char* sentence, const char* compareWord) { while (*compareWord != '\0' && *sentence == *compareWord) { ++sentence; ++compareWord; } if (*compareWord == '\0' && (*sentence == '\0' || *sentence == ' ')) { return 0; } return *sentence < *compareWord ? -1 ...


5

Others have already pointed out std::vector. Here's roughly how code using it could look: #include <vector> #include <iostream> struct point { double x; double y; friend std::istream &operator>>(std::istream &is, point &p) { return is >> p.x >> p.y; } friend std::ostream ...


4

sss *SSS; SSS->Variables = (Variable *) calloc(15,sizeof(Variable)); SSS is an uninitialised pointer. You need to allocate memory for it before allocating SSS->Variables. You can either place SSS on the stack sss SSS; SSS.Variables = calloc(15,sizeof(Variable)); or allocate it dynamically on the heap sss *SSS = malloc(sizeof(*SSS)); ...


4

The problem is that your destructor is not virtual. Declare the destructor as virtual.


4

You shouldn't be calling the destructor here: arr.~Array(); When arr goes out of scope, the destructor is called a second time. That leads to undefined behaviour when delete[] is called on the pointer data member arr. When you set that to 0, you side-step the problem, but the fact remains that you shouldn't be invoking the destructor like that. Here's an ...


4

There's no way for C to know how your indexing is supposed to work: there's no information that associates the number of columns (col) with myArray. When you do myArray[i][j] with myArray declared as int * *, C will first evalutate myArray[i], i.e. read the i:th value of myArray as if it were an integer pointer, which it isn't in your case. It will then ...


4

Fillchar takes an untyped parameter, not a pointer. As it is you are overwriting the pointer itself (and memory well beyond it) with zeroes. You want to dereference the pointer to use it with Fillchar: FillChar(sym^, SizeOf(foo), #0); Untyped parameters are the parameters of the form const foo, var foo, out foo with seemingly no type attached to them. ...


4

You need to allocate room for both the array of character pointers, which is what you're going to pass to execv(), and the characters themselves. Note that you can't use execl() for this, you need to use the array-based ones, such as execv(). char ** build_argv(const char *cmd, const float *x, size_t num) { char **args, *put; size_t i; /* Allow at ...


4

The main reasons not to use dynamic heap memory allocation here are basically: a) Determinism and, correlated, b) Memory fragmentation. Memory leaks are usually not a problem in those small embedded applications, because they will be detected very early in development/testing. Memory fragmentation can however become non-deterministic, causing (best case) ...


4

You could spend all day trying to adapt the standard smart pointer, or you could just write your own. They're not hard to do, especially if you're willing to cheat and allow access to the raw pointer itself. struct DnsRAII { PDNS_RECORD p; DnsRAII() : p(NULL) { } ~DnsRAII() { if (p != NULL) DnsRecordListFree(p, DnsFreeRecordList); } }; DnsRAII ...


4

your error is not to use c++. your problem can be reduced to: std::string initStr("initialitation string"); int a = 10; std::vector<std::string> myStringArray(a, initStr);


4

malloc does the equivalent task of operator new in c++, not new operator. They just allocates a memory location large enough for your need. new operator additionally fills the allocated memory with proper data by creating an object by calling the constructor in that memory. calloc fills in the bit with zeroes. Which one of malloc/calloc and operator new is ...


4

The problem with this approach is that even through the memory occupied by the BaseClass objects will be freed by the OS, ~BaseClass() will not be called. This could cause issues if these destructors do something important. But even if they don't, I still wouldn't recommend this. It will look fishy to anyone reading your code, and further, if you're using an ...


4

This is a classic mistake. A pointer to pointers is actually not the same as a two-dimensional array. Granted, you can access elements of both via the var[x][y] syntax, but the memory layout of int foo[x][y] is different from int **bar If you really want to have this dynamic, you will have to allocate space for your list of pointers, then allocate ...


4

You need to pass your target string pointer by address, and it must hold either the address of a previously allocate string, or NULL (if coded correctly). The size allocation must be both lengths + 2 (one for the deli separator, one for the terminator). The result can look something like this: #include <stdio.h> #include <stdlib.h> #include ...


4

Let's look at what happens when you insert the new node: temp1->next = temp; temp->next = temp1->next; This will make the previous node (temp1) point to the new node, which is good. It will then have the new node (temp) point to itself (temp1->next == temp), which is bad. To fix this, you can just swap those two lines. That is: if ...



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