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Why are you resetting all the mocks after creation? Can you remove that line and try if it works


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In my case I repeated same expected values 2 times. And it throws: java.lang.IllegalStateException: last method called on mock already has a non-fixed count set. E.G. SchedulingDataForVersion dataForVersion = createNiceMock(SchedulingDataForVersion.class); TaskSource mockedTaskSource = createNiceMock(TaskSource.class); ...


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You never did put the mock in replay state. Just add EasyMock.replay(contactService); at the end of your setUp method.


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You can actually mock and set expectation for new operator as well using PowerMock. Monitor monitor= PowerMock.createMock(Monitor.class); PowerMock.expectNew(Monitor.class, <hostcode parameter>).andReturn(monitor).once(); PowerMock.replayAll(monitor); PowerMock.verify(monitor); This way, you can verify if object is getting created ...


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Instead of using "@Mock" annotation for "private TradeIvTypeValidator tradeValid;", use "@NiceMock". Here NiceMock provides default implementations and if you are using "@Mock" its upto for developer to do the same


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I can make B as a class variable in A but that doesn't seem to help either. What would you suggest in this case? If you make B as a class variable, then you can mock B, and "swap" it in the tested object of A. Maybe not very elegant, but quick and simple. An example: public class B { int func2(int something){ return 3*something; } } ...


2

If you want to override the new B() constructor call - place it in an own method. public Class A { public func1() { B object = newB(); int x = object.func2(something); } protected B newB(){ return new B(); } } In your test you can then override the B constructor call. public class APartitialMock extends A { ...


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You seem to be mixing two things. You want to do a unit test with JUnit and EasyMock. This do not require Spring or any autowire. You will do the following: // Record the mock Bean2 mock = createMock(Bean2.class); expect(mock.getDesiredResult()).andReturn(new SomeObject()); replay(mock); // Configure the tested class MyBean testSubject = new MyBean(); ...


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You can try using PowerMock whenNew method https://github.com/jayway/powermock/wiki/MockitoUsage#how-to-mock-construction-of-new-objects More examples here - http://www.programcreek.com/java-api-examples/index.php?api=org.powermock.api.mockito.PowerMockito your code might look like - ...


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The test looks good except of the first line of setup method. public void setup() throws SQLException { sentencia = conexion.createStatement(); MockitoAnnotations.initMocks(this); //Mockito.initMocks(this); Mockito.when(conexion.createStatement()).thenReturn(sentencia); } It throws NPE as conexion.createStatement() is invoked before mocks ...


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You should PrepareForTest the static class: @PrepareForTest({YourStaticClass.class}) public class YourTestClass{...} And before you mock the static method you should use mockStatic(YourStaticClass.class);


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The problem was another line Request3 req3 = EasyMock.anyObject(Request3.class); that I was using in other tests, and whose instantiation I did not realize had side effects. It does.


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A simple trick would be createNiceMock(DataAccessException.class). But in fact, new DataAccessException("...") {} would also work.



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