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3

Short answer: Constants. Quoting Java Language Specification, section 9 "Interfaces", subsection 9.3 "Field (Constant) Declarations": Every field declaration in the body of an interface is implicitly public, static, and final. It is permitted to redundantly specify any or all of these modifiers for such fields. Specifying the implicit modifiers would ...


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If you insist on doing bidirectional M2M transformations, (so-called Bxs), then know that there is an active researcher's community updating that wiki : http://bx-community.wikidot.com. If you visit it, you will find that they list a bunch of tool suitable for Bx transformations http://bx-community.wikidot.com/relatedtools. I used ECHO in the past which ...


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You can take a look to the EMF-Facet project: https://www.eclipse.org/facet/ ...EMF Facet proposes a solution to extend existing Ecore metamodels without having to modify them. The idea is to provide non-intrusive mechanisms to add new features (types, attributes, operations and references) to a metamodel... I'm not sure that exactly what you are ...


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Here is how do I do it in xcore: interface Identifier { id String uid boolean derive_enabled = "true" unsettable String uid_derived readonly String uid_generated get { // this is the 'derived' parameter if(uid_derived==null || uid_derived.isEmpty){ uid_derived = EcoreUtil.generateUUID().toString } ...


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I would call it anti-pattern. Interfaces are meant for defining contracts using methods. In the provided interfaces, it seems to be used for global variables purpose. Logically, it does not make sense for an interface to have properties/attributes, classes should be used for an entity with attributes and operations. This could be done using a class and ...


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I think the underlying problem here is that EMF is a graph-based format; classes can be features of other classes, arguments to operations, etc. In general, this graph of relations can contain loops, cycles and knots. So anything that tries to modify things in-place is going to be tricky, requiring a full-blown graph traversal algorithm to make sure you ...


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The XMI file generated by EMF to persist instance models deals with the encoded quotes; why not reuse this framework to read and write models to let your own code focus on fonctionnal aspects ?


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If you want to access this information programmatically, have a look at org.eclipse.emf.ecore.EPackage.Registry.INSTANCE, it contains the global EPackage registry used by EMF. This list is populated by the extensions declared in the file plugin.xml of the Eclipse plugin with a model generated by EMF (create a genmodel for your ecore and generate the model ...


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You probably have the .ecore for your metamodel and you didn't generate the metamodel code (using .genmodel). The error you have occurs when you try to open your .xmi file using an EMF tool (Acceleo/QVT...etc). So, many points here ;). You can deal with static or dynamic instances of your metamodel. Static instances Static instances are produced when you ...


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I asked this question in Eclipse EMF forum and here is an answer. There is also an answer to this question here.. However, I briefly provide an answer to this question: Generally EAnnotations are used in Ecore to encode any kind of information which is not captured by Ecore at first place. For example, they are used in OCLInECore to hold OCL constraints, or ...



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