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5

parseInt expects to parse a string argument, so converts it to a string first. 1/1000000 when converted to a string is "0.000001", parseInt then ignores everything from "." onwards, since it is for integers only, so it reads it as 0. 1/10000000 is so small that converting it to a string uses scientific notation "1e-7", parseInt then ignores everything from ...


8

At first the question seems interesting. Then I looked at what 1/10000000 is. < 1/10000000 > 1e-7 Therefore: < parseInt("1e-7"); // note `parseInt` takes a STRING argument > 1 If you want to truncate to an integer, you can do this: function truncateToInteger(real) { return real - (real % 1); }


0

There is a great post on this: http://toddmotto.com/ditch-the-array-foreach-call-nodelist-hack/


6

According to this Github page the shims include all monkey-patches that faithfully represent the ES5 features. In other words: you can use the features provided by these files as if you were using ES5 proper. The shams, however contain those features that can not be emulated with other code. They basically provide the API, so your code doesn't crash but ...


1

As the error points out, a is expected to be a function, that is, it must be callable. The new keyword requires a function object that knows how to construct an instance - but a does not. Letting it inherit from Function.prototype (by using __proto__) does not help anything, callability is an intrinsic property of objects. You are able to call new f(), as f ...


0

For anyone looking for this in the future, get the V8 source: https://code.google.com/p/v8-wiki/wiki/UsingGit and look in src/messages.js. They're right at the top of the file. You'll have to do a search for the name of the error to find it's place in the source code though. On linux or in cygwin, you can use for example grep -R 'unexpected_token' .


8

Compatibility across all browsers and JS runtime engines. E.g., http://ejohn.org/blog/ecmascript-5-strict-mode-json-and-more/ No new syntax is introduced in order to enable strict mode. This is huge. This means that you can turn strict mode on in your scripts – today – and it’ll have, at worst, no side effect in old browsers.


1

Float is not an endless container. Consider this example: console.log(0.1 + 0.2 == 0.3) // Prints... FALSE! Or, another case: console.log(99999999999999999999999999999999999) // Prints 1e+35 ...while 1e+35 is just 1 with 35 zeroes. Original number (9999...) is so large and precise that JS starts cutting lower digits to store at least something - the ...


0

You have a typo. The standard defines the property as writable, not writeable. Fix the spelling in the b definition and it works perfectly: b: { value: 'value configured, but writeable', writable: true }


0

I think they mean that in the context of the step that deals with the exception. In practical terms: a try-catch. Once you catch an Exception it doesn't bubble up anymore.


2

It can be explained with this sample code: // our algorithm function foo() { // throw the exception throw 'a ball'; console.log('this is not output'); // terminated statement } // the calling algorithm function bar() { try { foo(); } catch (e) { // dealing with the exception } // no longer an exception here ...


0

To be able to filter for the current user, the condition of your CAML query should look like this: <Where> <Eq> <FieldRef Name='InternalNameOfYourPersonField' /> <Value Type='Integer'><UserID/></Value> </Eq> </Where You don't need to use the login name at all.


-1

Differences between declaring a variable with 'var' and without 'var' keyword: I would like to add two words to answer the question 'Initializing' and 'assignment' If you declare a variable with 'var' keyword it simply initialize the variable. Example: var x=10; (initialize the variable) If you declare a variable without 'var' keyword it will assign the ...



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