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3

The "non-fast-forward" error happens when try and push to a remote branch that has commits that your local branch does not. A pull (which will do a merge) and then a push should solve this. As far as the pull error message goes, it seems that you have committed a binary file to your repository. Try resetting it to the versioned version (by using git ...


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No, you can keep in within the MyProject folder: the gtit repo will match your Eclipse project. Keeping it outside would only be useful if you wanted to version multiple project in the same git repo. You might want to ignore IDE-specifc files (although I prefer keeping them, especially if the .classpath uses relative paths).


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I had the same problem an I figured out, I probably wanted to ignore a file and mistakenly clicked Team->Ignore while the project was selected. You cannot see it on the icon in front and I have found no way to undo it, other than editing or deleting the .gitignore file. Even if your project is already ignored, the "Ignore" option still shows up enabled in ...


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This worked for me in Eclipse IDE with EGit: Open Window->Show view->Other->Git->Git Repositories Right click on your repo in Git Repositories view -> Properties Click "Add Entry..." button key: branch.master.remote value: origin OK Click "Add Entry..." button key: branch.master.merge value: refs/heads/master OK ...


2

This question is really independent of Eclipse. The mechanism is the same whether you are doing git commit using Eclipse, Netbeans, or on the command line. You need to install a commit hook, either client side or server side depending on whether you want it after commit or push. Inside the hook script, you can do whatever you want, including talking to a ...


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The one library that you can use outside of any IDE, and for any of your java project, is JGit (sources at GitHub, User Guide). See "Confusion in choosing between JavaGit, JGit and EGit" That library can be used independently of Eclipse. As I mention in this answer, the package org.eclipse.jgit.test/tst/org/eclipse/jgit includes tons of tests, for you to ...


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You can check the filte button in the History View: The last one, if unselected, should focus the history to the current branch only.


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That Eclipse project is in a sub-folder of that repo, /swingbits. If you import that existing project into your Eclipse workspace it will automatically detect the .project and .classpath files that are there. If you have Eclipse m2e installed, it will also detect that this is a Maven project and treat it appropriately.


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You can set the Git configuration gerrit.createchangeid to true. With this, it should automatically be added. As with other Git configuration, this can be set in the repository (.git/config) or the user configuration (.gitconfig in the user directory).


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The OP Kai comments I think it's caused by some glitch in workspace setting: merely removing the project from workspace, moving it to another directory, importing it back (with copy), and voila the git repo is now magically found. – If it was really a bare repo, then you would need to convert your bare repo into a non-bare one, ...


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Is the mentioned path contained in a repository that is connected in Eclipse? Open the Git Repositories view and see if it contains any unusual entries, like a "Tom" repository or something like that. If it does and you do not use it, try removing it from the view using the context menu.


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Calling a CommitCommand will always create a commit, regardless of whether there are any changes or not. In your case, the second and third commit will be empty, i.e. it does not reference any files. To create a commit only if the work directory contains changes you can check its status first like so: if( !g.status().call().isClean() ) { g.commit()... } ...


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Right-click on the Working Directory in the Git Repositories view and Import the projects into the Eclipse workspace. They will not be copied. Clones can contain more than one project--wouldn't want to automatically import all of them (plus some of them might be one-off test projects buried in the tree somewhere).



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