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16

You want .norm(). Note that there's also .squaredNorm(), .normalized() and .normalize().


16

You can use the data() member function of the Eigen Matrix class. The layout by default is column-major, not row-major as a multidimensional C array (the layout can be chosen when creating a Matrix object). For sparse matrices the preceding sentence obviously doesn't apply.


15

It is entirely possible that Eigen is just a terribly written library (or just poorly-thought out); just because something is online doesn't make it true. For example: Passing objects by value is almost always a very bad idea in C++, as this means useless copies, and one should pass them by reference instead. This is not good advice in general, ...


13

The way in OpenCV 2.4.1 is: A.row(0).copyTo(B.row(0)); A.row(2).copyTo(B.row(1)); A.row(4).copyTo(B.row(2));


12

You have to catch with the correct exception type. Use: catch( std::exception &e ) instead of: catch( int e )


12

Using Eigen expressions will leverage SIMD and cache optimized algorithms, so yes it should definitely be faster, and in any case, much simpler to write: MatrixXd centered = mat.rowwise() - mat.colwise().mean(); MatrixXd cov = (centered.adjoint() * centered) / double(mat.rows() - 1); Moreover, assuming "data" is a typedef for a double[21], then you can ...


12

Let's declare too matrices: SparseMatrix<double> spMat; MatrixXd dMat; Sparse to dense: dMat = MatrixXd(spMat); Dense to sparse: spMat = dMat.sparseView();


12

The best way to solve A system of linear equations of the Form Ax = b is to do the following. decompose A into the format A = M1 * M2 Solve M1 * y = b for y Solve M2 * x = y for x For square matrices, step 1 would use LU Decomposition. For non square matrices, step 1 would use QR Decomposition. If matrix A is positive definite and not sparse you'd ...


11

You should consider using Eigen::Map to wrap OpenCV matrices in order to be used directly by the Eigen SDK. This allows you to apply almost all functionalities implemented in Eigen on matrix allocated by OpenCV In particular you simply instantiate an Eigen::Map providing the pointer to the cv::Mat buffer: //allocate memory for a 4x4 float matrix cv::Mat ...


11

I found push_back. Create B with size 0 x vec_length and then use push_back to add the selected rows from A: #include <iostream> #include <vector> #include <opencv/cv.h> int main(int argc, char **argv) { const int num_points = 5; const int vec_length = 3; cv::Mat A(num_points, vec_length, CV_32FC1); cv::RNG rng(0); // ...


9

If you can write it on cout, it works for any std::ostream: #include <fstream> int main() { std::ofstream file("test.txt"); if (file.is_open()) { MatrixXf m = MatrixXf::Random(30,3); file << "Here is the matrix m:\n" << m << '\n'; file << "m" << '\n' << colm(m) << '\n'; } }


9

Found in the documentation :/ The way to access a single column is .col(i), and similarly for row, its .row(i). Also of interest is .block<>.


9

If you're using Eigen's MatrixXd types, those are dynamically sized. You should get much better results from using the fixed size types e.g Matrix4d, Vector4d. Also, make sure you're compiling such that the code can get vectorized; see the relevant Eigen documentation. Re your thought on using the Direct3D extensions library stuff (D3DXMATRIX etc): it's ...


9

The USING_PART_OF_NAMESPACE_EIGEN macro was removed in Eigen 3. Instead, simply use using namespace Eigen; Apparently, the tutorial is outdated.


9

You don't need to. Your object is being created on the stack and will be automatically deleted when it goes out of scope.


9

They could do this in C++11: class alignas(16) Matrix4f { // ... }; Now the class will always be aligned on a 16-byte boundary. Also, maybe I'm being silly but this shouldn't be an issue anyway. Given a class like this: class Matrix4f { public: // ... private: // their data type (aligned however they decided in that library): ...


9

Eigen has lazy evaluation. From How does Eigen compare to BLAS/LAPACK?: For operations involving complex expressions, Eigen is inherently faster than any BLAS implementation because it can handle and optimize a whole operation globally -- while BLAS forces the programmer to split complex operations into small steps that match the BLAS ...


9

You should read the boost::serialization documentation on the subject of serializable concept. It basically says that the types needs to be primitive or Serializable. The Eigen type is none of it, which your compiler is trying to tell you. In order to make Eigen types serializable you will need to implement the following free function template<class ...


8

You can look up what the Trait is in the LLT.h header file. Its a TriangularView like the documentation says. The triangular view does not have a col member, so that is why you get the error. Copying the triangular view into a dense matrix like so: Eigen::MatrixXd P(3,3); P << 6, 0, 0, 0, 4, 0, 0, 0, 7; Eigen::MatrixXd L( P.llt().matrixL() ); ...


8

I did some benchmarks to checkout which way is quicker, I got the following results (in seconds): 12 30 3 6 23 3 The first line is doing iteration as suggested by @jleahy. The second line is doing iteration as I've done in my code in the question (the inverse order of @jleahy). The third line is doing iteration using PlainObjectBase::data()like this for ...


8

It seems that the compiler is smarter than you think and still optimizes a lot of stuff away. On my platform, I get about 9ms without -march=native and about 39ms with -march=native. However, if I replace the line above the return by std::cout<<accumulator<<"\n"; then the timings change to 78ms without -march=native and about 39ms with ...


8

catch( std::bad_alloc& e) { } should help


8

You should profile and then optimize first the algorithm, then the implementation. In particular, the posted code is quite innefficient: for (int i=0;i<pointVector.size();i++ ) { Eigen::MatrixXd outcome = (rotation*scale)* (*pointVector[i]) + translation; I don't know the library, so I won't even try to guess the number of unnecessary temporaries ...


8

After some debugging, I think the problem is located in Eigen. In the file src/Core/products/GeneralBlockPanelKernel.h there is a function called manage_caching_sizes that declares two static variables: static std::ptrdiff_t m_l1CacheSize = 0; static std::ptrdiff_t m_l2CacheSize = 0; Changing this to: static std::ptrdiff_t m_l1CacheSize = 0; static ...


8

Because you're not compiling with any optimizations. (There's no -O2 in CXXFLAGS, the -O2 in the $(PROGRAM) rule only applies to the link step.)


8

You can also use void eigen2cv(const Eigen::Matrix<_Tp, _rows, _cols, _options, _maxRows, _maxCols>& src, Mat& dst) and void cv2eigen(const Mat& src, Eigen::Matrix<_Tp, _rows, _cols, _options, _maxRows, _maxCols>& dst) from #include <opencv2/core/eigen.hpp>.


8

Your expression for the RSS matrix formula is extremely inefficient. You do this: Eigen::MatrixXd RSS = ( (Y - X * ( ( X.transpose() * X ).inverse() * X.transpose() * Y ) ).transpose() ) * ( Y - X * ( ( X.transpose() * X ).inverse() * X.transpose() * Y ) ); which is clearly very repetitive and re-computes the same expensive operations ...


7

Perhaps I am not understanding the question correctly, but within Rcpp, I don't see how you could possibly do this more efficiently than a for loop. for loops are generally inefficient in R only because iterating through a loop in R requires a lot of heavy interpreted machinery. But this is not the case once you are down at the C++ level. Even natively ...


7

According to Eigen Doc: Vector(const T * array) Constructor reading the coords from an array. And vector reference: std::vector::data T* data(); const T* data() const; Returns pointer to the underlying array serving as element storage. The pointer is such that range [data(); data() + size()) is always a valid range, even if the container is ...


7

You need to multiply by the size of a double: memcpy(data_memcopy,M.data(),M.size() * sizeof(double)); Otherwise, you are only copying M.size() bytes, and each double is more than one byte on your machine. So you were probably only writing to the first and second doubles (they probably are 8 bytes on your system, since you copied the first one ...



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