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5

Try with Eigen::Matrix3d x_r; Eigen::Matrix3d y_r; Eigen::Matrix3d z_r; x_r << 1.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0, cos(x), -sin(x), 0.0 ,sin(x), cos(x); y_r << cos(y), 0.0, sin(y), 0.0, 1.0, 0.0, -sin(y), 0.0, cos(y); z_r << cos(z), -sin(z), 0.0, sin(z), cos(z), 0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 1.0; Eigen::Matrix3d rot = ...


3

You need to use the matrix and vector as arrays (and not linear algebra objects, see docs). To do so, you would rewrite the relevant line as: mat = mat.array().rowwise() / vec.transpose().array(); cout << mat << endl; // Note that in the original this was vec The transpose is needed as the VectorXf is a column vector by definition, and you ...


2

The Eigen::VectorXd is a container that will dynamically allocate the needed memory for its own contents (the array of elements), so all of the following will work: VectorXd* z1 = new VectorXd(VectorXd::Random(10)); // compiles std::cout << "z1:\n" << z1->transpose() << "\n\n"; VectorXd* z2 = new VectorXd(); // also compiles ...


2

The best you can do is to implement the Thomas algorithm yourself. Nothing can beat the speed of that. The algorithm is so simple, that nor Eigen nor BLAS will beat your hand-written code. In case you have to solve a series of matrices, the procedure is very well vectorizable. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tridiagonal_matrix_algorithm If you want to stick ...


2

Add one line of code to your source file where you want to use Eigen. #include "Eigen/Dense" Put Eigen (extracted zip file) in a directory where you put your existing working header file.


2

To answer on the OSX side, first of all recall that on OSX g++ is actually an alias to clang++, and the current Apple's version of clang does not support openmp. Nonetheless, using Eigen3.3-beta-1, and default clang++, I get on a macbookpro 2.6Ghz: $ clang++ -mfma -I ../eigen so_gemm_perf.cpp -O3 -DNDEBUG && ./a.out 2954.91ms Then to get ...


2

JacobiSVD is expected to be slow for large matrices. Regarding BDCSVD, please try the one in the 3.3-beta1 release (or devel branch). It is now in the official Eigen/SVD module and it has been considerably improved.


2

Eigen::Matrix<std::complex<double>,3,1> eigenvalues = solver.eigenvalues(); Eigen::Matrix<std::complex<double>,3,3> eigenvec = solver.eigenvectors();


1

I kinda took this as a challenge and wrote up what I'd probably do to solve your problem. (Uses C++11 features) #include <iostream> #include <vector> #include <tuple> #include <algorithm> double data[4][5] = { { 0.60, 0.70, 0.80, 0.90, 0.00 }, { 0.51, 0.61, 0.71, 0.81, 0.91 }, { 0.41, 0.31, 0.21, 0.11, 0.01 }, { ...


1

As posted, your question is very hard to answer. There are a bunch of errors in template code which is determined by your usage at compile time. For future reference, it would make it much easier on both you and those attempting to answer if you tried to boil it down to a MCVE (also worth reading, How do I ask a good question?). So, after reading the above ...


1

Edit: The code to enable this form of wrapping has been merged into the dev version of RcppEigen. Feel free to grab a copy via: devtools::install_github("RcppCore/RcppEigen") Original: Per RcppEigen's unit tests and exporters, it looks as if only VectorXd/VectorXi presently has an export class set up. This needs to be added to the exporter class. Here ...


1

In your example you try to construct the matrix by passing the matrix entries in the constructor. But the constructor does not take the matrix entries as arguments, even if it is a fixed (matrix) size type like Eigen::Matrix3d. You can set the matrix entries with the overloaded operator() after the matrix object is constructed, e.g.: Eigen::Matrix3d M; M( ...


1

Change all your variables to Eigen::Dynamic size instead of hard coding them and it should work. Or, use the built-in types as such: #include <Eigen/Core> #include <unsupported/Eigen/FFT> int main () { size_t dim_x = 28, dim_y = 126; Eigen::FFT<float> fft; Eigen::MatrixXf in = Eigen::MatrixXf::Random(dim_x, dim_y); ...


1

That's the wrong order of operations. You first calculate the eigenvalues and next exponentiate those. The reason is that eigenvalues of the exponentiated matrix are equal to the exponentiated eigenvalues of the original matrix. EDIT: provided the eigenvalues of the original matrix exist. So, for example, to get the eigenvalues of your matrix mat2 you ...


1

For template code use the MatrixBase approach, and to control the scalar type, then use either a static assertion or a enable_if construct. Use typename Derived::Scalar to get the scalar type of the expression.


1

It looks like your only option is to use a rather ugly clang-format switching syntax: Eigen::Matrix3i T; // clang-format off T << 1, 0, 0, 0, 2, 0, 0, 0, 3; // clang-format on



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