Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

65

If you're willing to use Scalaz, it has a handful of tools that make this kind of task more convenient, including a new Validation class and some useful right-biased type class instances for plain old scala.Either. I'll give an example of each here. Accumulating errors with Validation First for our Scalaz imports (note that we have to hide scalaz.Category ...


38

I'm neither of the authors of Functional Programming in Scala, but I can make a few guesses about why they don't mention Try. Some people don't like the standard library's Try because they claim it violates the functor composition law. I personally think that this position is kind of silly, for the reasons Josh Suereth mentions in the comments of SI-6284, ...


37

Either is used to return one of possible two meaningful results, unlike Option which is used to return a single meaningful result or nothing. An easy to understand example is given below (circulated on the Scala mailing list a while back): def throwableToLeft[T](block: => T): Either[java.lang.Throwable, T] = try { Right(block) } catch { case ...


31

It doesn't work because Either is not a monad. Though there's talk of right-biasing it, you can't use it in a for-comprehension: you have to get a LeftProject or RightProjection, like below: for { foo <- Right[String,Int](1).right bar <- Left[String,Int]("nope").right } yield (foo + bar) That returns Left("nope"), by the way. On Scalaz, you'd ...


31

The basic guideline is to use exceptions for something really exceptional**. For an "ordinary" failure, it's far better to use Option or Either. If you are interfacing with Java where exceptions are thrown when someone sneezes the wrong way, you can use Try to keep yourself safe. Let's take some examples. Suppose you have a method that fetches something ...


19

I generally prefer using fold. You can use it like map: scala> def a: Either[Exception,String] = Right("On") a.fold(l => Left(l), r => Right(r.length)) res0: Product with Either[Exception,Int] = Right(2) Or you can use it like a pattern match: scala> a.fold( l => { | println("This was bad") | }, r => { | ...


18

We have such a function in the standard libraries, Control.Arrow.left :: a b c -> a (Either b d) (Either c d) is the generalisation to arbitrary Arrows. Substitute (->) for a and apply it infix, to get the specialisation left :: (b -> c) -> Either b d -> Either c d There is nothing wrong with your approach in principle, it's a sensible ...


16

This instance has been added in base 4.3.x.x, which comes with ghc 7. Meanwhile, you can use the Either instance directly, or, if you are using Either to represent something that may fail you should use ErrorT monad transformer.


16

The reverse convention is actually just the monad definition for Either and the definition for sequence is adequate for this: ghci> :t sequence :: [Either a b] -> Either a [b] sequence :: [Either a b] -> Either a [b] :: [Either a b] -> Either a [b] To actually apply this to your case we'd therefore need a function flipEither: ...


14

There is no spoon. You didn't hear it from me. For this particular example, though, you should use reads instead.


13

Is this functionality available through some import? Yes, but via a third party import: Scalaz provides a Monad instance for Either. import scalaz._, Scalaz._ scala> for { | foo <- 1.right[String] | bar <- "nope".left[Int] | } yield (foo.toString + bar) res39: Either[String,java.lang.String] = Left(nope) Now if-guard is ...


13

You're trying to make the Functor instance work on the Success part, which is the normal thing to do, but because of the order of your type parameters it is being defined on the type in the Failure part instead. Since you've defined it as data Validation a b = Success a | Failure b instance Functor (Validation a) where ... This means that your ...


13

This is right. There is also another quite important reason for this behavior: You can think of Either a b as a computation, that may succeed and return b or fail with an error message a. (This is also, how the monad instance works). So it's only natural, that the functor instance won't touch the Left values, since you want to map over the computation, if it ...


12

The easiest way is with pattern matching val a = A() a match{ case Left(exception) => // do something with the exception case Right(arrayBuffer) => // do something with the arrayBuffer } Alternatively, there a variety of fairly straightforward methods on Either, which can be used for the job. Here's the scaladoc ...


12

Scalaz library has something alike Either named Validation. It is more idiomatic than Either for use as "get either a valid result or a failure". Validation also allows to accumulate errors. Edit: "alike" Either is complettly false, because Validation is an applicative functor, and scalaz Either, named \/ (pronounced "disjonction" or "either"), is a monad. ...


12

This can be done easily with lens: import Control.Lens over _left (+1) $ Left 10 => Left 11 over _left (+1) $ Right 10 => Right 10 over _right (+1) $ Right 10 => Right 11


12

Given that I think this is homework, I'll not answer, but give important hints: If you look for the definitions on hoogle (http://www.haskell.org/hoogle/) you find data Bool = True | False data Either a b = Left a | Right b This means that Bool can only be True or False, but that Either a b can be Left a or Right b. which means your functions should ...


11

I'd suggest using Either[java.lang.Throwable, A] (where Throwable still gives you access to the stack trace), and (in general) making your custom error types extend java.lang.Exception. This is the practice used by Dispatch 0.9, for example, where Either[Throwable, A] is used to represent computations that may fail, and the custom error types look like ...


11

Not sure this is really much neater, but : scala> def splitEitherList[A,B](el: List[Either[A,B]]) = { val (lefts, rights) = el.partition(_.isLeft) (lefts.map(_.left.get), rights.map(_.right.get)) } splitEitherList: [A, B](el: List[Either[A,B]])(List[A], List[B]) scala> val el : List[Either[Int, String]] = List(Left(1), ...


10

Do one of Declare it explicitly as an Either[X, Y]. Declare it as MaybeResult[Y] (for type MaybeResult[A] = Either[Failure, A]) Frankly, even then I would declare it explicitly. The advantage of #2 (over your suggestion) is that, with a standard Failure type (perhaps Exception or List[String]), you do not have to declare separate type aliases for ...


10

Not getOrElse, just orElse scala> val userName : Option[String] = None userName: Option[String] = None scala> val impersonate = Some("Fred") impersonate: Some[java.lang.String] = Some(Fred) scala> userName orElse impersonate res0: Option[String] = Some(Fred) scala> val userName = Some("George") userName: Some[java.lang.String] = Some(George) ...


10

The entire notion of "changing the container" is called a "natural transformation". Specifically, we want a function which transforms containers without affecting what's inside. We can ensure this is the case in the type system by using forall. -- natural transformation type (m :~> n) = forall a. m a -> n a Then these can be applied whenever we ...


10

You want to isolate the test* methods and stop using a comprehension! Assuming (for whatever reason) that scalaz isn't an option for you... it can be done without having to add the dependency. Unlike a lot of scalaz examples, this is one where the library doesn't reduce verbosity much more than "regular" scala can: def testPerson(person: Person): ...


10

The instance for Maybe is defined explicitly in GHC.Show, along with instances for a whole bunch of other common types like tuples. You can find out where an instance was defined using the :i command in ghci: Prelude> :i Maybe data Maybe a = Nothing | Just a -- Defined in ‘Data.Maybe’ instance Eq a => Eq (Maybe a) -- Defined in ‘Data.Maybe’ ...


9

Most of the confusion stems from the fact Left and Right are used backwards. Considering only the type for return, its type from the Monad typeclass is as follows: return :: (Monad m) => b -> m b You're trying to define an instance for m = Either a, so return should have type: return :: b -> Either a b You're defining it as Left, which has ...


9

data.partition(_.isLeft) match { case (Nil, ints) => Right(for(Right(i) <- ints) yield i) case (strings, _) => Left(for(Left(s) <- strings) yield s) } //For one pass: data.partition(_.isLeft) match { case (Nil, ints) => Right(for(Right(i) <- ints.view) yield i) ...


9

As people have been pointing out, there is no such function in the standard library, and you can implement your own in various ways. However, note that questions of the form "Is X in the standard library?" are most easily answered by Hoogle, since even if you don't know the name of a function, you can search for it by its type. Hoogle is also smart enough ...


9

collect is made for exactly this kind of situation: def filterMe[U,T](in: List[Either[U,T]]): List[T] = in.collect{ case Right(r) => r } In fact, it's so good at this you may want to skip the def and just ins.map(DSJsonMapper.parseDsResult).collect{ case Right(r) => r }


9

Let me suggest a more invasive change. Instead of x :: A f :: A -> Either B A xs :: [Either B A] consider x :: A f :: A -> Writer [A] B and forget xs entirely. Where before f was a single step of the iteration, it is now recursive; where before it would return Right a, you now tell [a] >> f a; where before it would return Left b, you now ...


9

This operation is often called sequencing, and is available in the standard libraries of some functional languages (such as Haskell). In Scala you can either implement your own, or use an external library like Scalaz. Suppose we have the following, for example: val xs: List[Either[String, Int]] = List(Right(1), Right(2)) val ys: List[Either[String, Int]] = ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible