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0

I found a solution to the problem, adding some dependencies. <dependency> <groupId>org.jboss.spec.javax.ejb</groupId> <artifactId>jboss-ejb-api_3.1_spec</artifactId> <scope>test</scope> <version>1.0.2.Final</version> </dependency> <dependency> ...


0

I think, I have a solution for that problem. My problem was also, that the timer was deleted, if EJB/JPA errors occurred. I've just tried to solve this problem with CDI Events, because I wanted the Exception, that could be thrown to be at another place, so the @Schedule doesn't get touched. I thought using cdi events will decouple the @Schedule from the ...


0

I got rid of this error after switching to apache-tomee-plus-1.6.0.


0

Try changing the way you get and set the userId. instead of this line session.setAttribute("UserId", user.getId()); try this ExternalContext externalContext = FacesContext.getCurrentInstance().getExternalContext(); Map<String, Object> sessionMap = externalContext.getSessionMap(); sessionMap.put("UserId", user.getId()); and instead of this ...


0

First some remarks about the mode: I don't think School should have a OneToOne relationship with User. More likely it is a OneToMany relationship. And maybe you don't want to have a separate Entity for Adresse, it could probably be an Embeddable instead. How is your persistence set up? How are you managing transactions? The problem you see might be caused ...


0

So your timeout is too short, or something went wrong at the server end so your timeout got triggered. Timeout intervals should be long enough that the server has plenty of time to do what it has to do, so that a timeout really means a server failure rather than just a loaded server or a complex request. You can start by setting it to double the expected ...


0

I saw your post on my answer here. I'm not very familiar with JBoss proprietary security, neither do I recommend having it embedded in the code, but I guess that's not my problem. From your code, I don't see security-role or @DeclareRoles present; it is clearly mentioned in my answer that you need either one for annotation-based security to work. DId you ...


1

Use the Remote Interface Name for lookup via JNDI. Then use the PortableRemoteObject.narrow() method to cast it to your remote bean. Object obj = ctx.lookup("HelloBeanRemote"); HelloBean bean = (HelloBean) PortableRemoteObject.narrow(obj, HelloBean.class);


1

I never tried it, but I think it should be no (big) problem. Yes, they can coexist. E.g if for every deployment a separated ClassLoader is used. Transactions from each application will NOT know of each other. It will be the same as two users would click one after another on the same button. I personally don't see any problems. If your server is strange ...


0

http://docs.oracle.com/cd/E14571_01/web.1111/e13727/manage_apps.htm#i1241721 is this what you are looking for ?


0

Maybe try to define 3 Data sources and 3 Persistence units. <persistence-unit name="PU1"> <jta-data-source>jdbc/DS1</jta-data-source> ... </persistence-unit> <persistence-unit name="PU2"> <jta-data-source>jdbc/DS2</jta-data-source> ... </persistence-unit> <persistence-unit name="PU3"> ...


1

The Application Development Guide contains some sections (only available as PDF?): https://glassfish.java.net/docs/4.0/application-development-guide.pdf https://glassfish.java.net/documentation.html


1

How do you intend to deploy your application? In my days when i use to develop application clients for the ACC, i used to bundle everything in an EAR (I will still do that, cause it is easier). Glassfish deploys the artifacts, generates required configurations (You can override configurations in application.xml anyway). One thing that the ACC takes care ...


2

The most obvious solution is to turn your MyClass itself into a @Singleton. The EJB 3.1 spec does allow the use of @Schedule in singletons. Section 18.2.3 of the spec even contains the following example: @Singleton public class CacheBean { Cache cache; // Setup an automatic timer to refresh // the Singleton instance cache every 10 minutes ...


0

Timeout problems occur in @Singleton or @Stateful EJB. If this is the case, and the transaction needs to be thread safe, consider: @Schedule(persistent=false, minute="*", hour="*") @AccessTimeout(SOME_MORE_MINUTES) public void startBaidu() { // 1) Get some data about URL from database // 2) GET THE RESULTS FROM URL BY SELENIUM // 3) Store the ...


0

Have you checked the long times for step 2 aren't simply due to how Selenium functions? It may be worth researching alternative solutions, or creating your own more efficient replacement. Alternatively, you can increase the timeout (although obviously this isn't ideal) in your config.xml, specifically this section: <JTA ...


0

necroing an old question - When you turned this into stateless, it turned into a singleton model, so injecting fields is no longer thread safe. The same thing happens when you turn a jax-rs service into Spring bean. The safer way to do this is the workaround you mentioned, and inject the methods parameters.


0

We faced this problem also when passing the ejb reference from one method to another to be used in the second one. So you better create the context, get the ejb, use it and close the context in one method.


1

First and foremost, MemcachedPoolService is a stateless service, and hence if you are not doing any db updates that require consistency (Thats why it is @Singleton anyway, otherwise you would use @Stateless), then simply mark the class as @Singleton @Lock(LockType.READ) public class MemcachedPoolService{} or @Singleton public class MemcachedPoolService{ ...


0

You're right, feel free to vote for https://jira.codehaus.org/browse/SONARJAVA-117 which should be fixed in version 2.5 of the SonarQube Java plugin.


0

Solution was reset glassfish cache and all works fine ;)


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According to ejb3-1 specification: 4.9.2 Session Bean Class The following are the requirements for the session bean class: • The class must be defined as public, must not be final, and must not be abstract. The class must be a top level class


-1

I see that you didn't declare private your entitymanager and your ejb JpaDao, and I think it is a bad habit. I think you can begin to try set private your entityManager, put the corresponding getter and setter which will respect the convention, and try again. Because I have some problem with another attribute and it was because something like that


0

You should not inject a stateful EJB into a stateless EJB. This can have very unpredicatable consequences, because lifecycle of a stateful EJB is started when injected and managed by owning bean. In the worst case, stateless EJB can be reused by application server for different users, which would then access the same stateful EJB. In your case, a user would ...


0

Is MEJBBean part of your beans or an external library? The stacktrace is missing more information. There should be at least caused by... There is a likelihood that maven (on whichever ide you use) sets the correct dependency paths, but on building with dependency, this path is not copied, either because this external dependency has scope provided or is set ...


0

In case someone else google here like I did, it's possible to do that in TomEE: http://svn.apache.org/repos/asf/tomee/tomee/trunk/server/openejb-cxf/src/test/java/org/apache/openejb/server/cxf/handler/SimpleHandler.java


0

I'm pretty sure that is the parameter, you should use the @Consumes annotation to pass a Person object as JSON/XML parameter or use the same @QueryParam annotations to describe the object to persist. @POST @Consumes(MediaType.APPLICATION_JSON) public Person getPerson3(Person person) { this.personFasade.create(person); return person; }


1

EJBs components are managed (by the container) which implies some extra overhead. There is an antipattern called Sledgehammer for a Fly: Describes when EJB, a technology that comes with extra overhead, is chosen over a simple POJO where only lightweight processing is the requirement. Generates additional complexity; no apparent benefit The solution: If ...


0

I started from scratch. The only difference I can think of is that instead of making an EJB application, I just made an EJB module for the bean. Otherwise, I think it's the same. structure: thufir@dur:~/NetBeansProjects$ thufir@dur:~/NetBeansProjects$ tree HelloLibrary/ HelloLibrary/ ├── build.xml ├── nbproject │   ├── build-impl.xml │   ├── ...


0

Wow, I think I was able to call the bean, sort of, with: Object o = ic.lookup("java:global/RemoteSalutation-ejb/MyRemoteSessionClass!net.bounceme.dur.glassfish.MyRemoteSession"); but I get back this huge mess: -run: [java] Sep 13, 2014 8:10:23 AM net.bounceme.dur.remote.RemoteLookup run [java] INFO: java.naming.factory.initial ...


2

Here is what I figured. Throwing it here as additional info. The archtypes are not available in the glassfish install that comes packaged with Netbeans 8.0.1. I downloaded Java EE SDK update 1 from http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/java/javaee/downloads/index.html. Once the downloaded .zip is extracted, the java_ee_sdk-7u1\glassfish4\docs\firstcup\example ...


1

Adding to the answer of maress; since a Stateless bean is for the client in fact stateless, the container does not necessarily have to serialize anything for it. Every other call to a stateless bean can go to a different bean instance anyway, or every other call can cause a new bean instance to be created (which is the default behavior in WildFly 8 if I'm ...


1

Try Object o = ic.lookup("salutationBean"); Note that mappedName specifies the name to use in JNDI for a remote access.


1

Section 6.6.3. (Passivation capable dependencies) of CDI spec states that the container guarantees Stateless beans are Passivation capable whether you declare your stateless bean serializable or not. Section 6.6.5 of the specs states that an error occurs at deployment if a passivating scope ('@SessionScoped' for example) declares a dependency to a ...


2

Currently I have changed the Java plat from jdk 1.5 to Jdk 1.6 in Netbean properties Now EJB build successfully.


1

Try increasing memory of netbeans. In the etc directory under your Netbeans-Home, edit the file netbeans.conf file. -Xms and -Xmx should be increased to the values that allow your program to compile. Here are the instructions in netbeans.conf: Note that default -Xmx and -XX:MaxPermSize are selected for you automatically. You can find these values in ...


1

You need to look in the documentation for each provider, in your case, the COSNaming provider, on the JNDI documentation page.


1

Synchronized keyword solved my problem. Did not find out what was wrong with original code.


0

I have same problem, first thing to do is to define new context root in application.xml and/or weblogic.xml file. According to this answer: http://stackoverflow.com/a/9869744/3841109 you'll have to change persistence unit name also. If I succeed with my problem I'll repost additional info... Best regards.


1

(just restating what I wrote into comment to get this question from "unanswered" list) You should checkou out Tyrus CDI sample/test. It demonstrates list what you can do with current implementation. We are always open for new test cases, but there are some issues with the spec itself - standard Request scopes don't work for WebSocket runtime, because it ...


1

It might be a bit late to answer this, You can in tomee place the resource definition in WEB-INF/resources.xml.


1

Using threads explicitly is generally no good in a EJB environment. They populate/polute the server and might come out of control, causing problems for the server, because they are not controlled by the EJB container. A better solution is to use the @Asynchronous annotation on a method of the singleton for example. With this you can start asynchronous ...


4

The short answer is "always unless you need specific EJB facilities". The longer answer is the following. Years ago when EJB prior 3.0 were used the EJB was something "heavy". You had to implement interface, inherit your bean from base class etc. Shortly EJB could be used in container only. This means that writing unit tests for EJB was very difficult. ...


0

I solved this issue with the same technique that you use, but with a different approach. Instead of marking it as internal I just ignore all the params with the type AsyncResponse, that way I don't need to update the code in all methods to add the access modifier. public class CustomSwaggerSpecFilter implements SwaggerSpecFilter { @Override public ...


2

It is hot deployment and not hot reload of ejb, which means, updating an EJB without having to stop and restart the application server. Few application servers support this few don't. You don't have to worry about it, its application server that provides it for your use. Few application servers does it seamlessly, for example, In weblogic, you can just ...


0

You got something completly wrong. You use a JSF page as a webservice, which is terrible. If you wan't to create a webservice to retrieve JSON objects, you should create a restful service with something like Spring or JAX-RS. For Example with JAX-RS: @Path("userportal/json/metallica") public class JSONService { @GET @Path("/get") ...


1

instead of: document.getElementById('time').innerHTML = today.getTime(); try this: document.getElementsByName("time")[0].value = today.getTime();


0

Well <input type="hidden" name="time" value="time"/> This line will pass string "time" only as the value attribute of this hiddle form field has "time" as string. What you realy need to do is write a javascript function onSubmit of form and then set the value of this parameter to whatever you want. <script> function submit(form) { ...


1

If you are doing a real remote lookup, you cannot do it through the CDI's BeanManager, since the Swing GUI is not local. First you need to configure the application server to allow remote calls - this most likely includes some authentication settings, but I have never done this on Glassfish. Here is how we lookup the remote interface of our EJB bean in ...


0

This looks like an initialization ordering bug in GlassFish. The @Eager @ApplicationScoped runs in a ServletContextListener. Apparently at that point GlassFish hasn't EJBs ready for injection. This construct works in e.g. WildFly. However, in CDI's name of unifying various different depency injection approaches throughout Java EE, you can also just use ...



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