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11

See http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.diagnostics.stopwatch.elapsedticks.aspx: Note Stopwatch ticks are different from DateTime.Ticks. Each tick in the DateTime.Ticks value represents one 100-nanosecond interval. Each tick in the ElapsedTicks value represents the time interval equal to 1 second divided by the Frequency.


9

You really should be using something like the Tkinter after method rather than time.sleep(...). There's an example of using the after method at this other stackoverflow question. Here's a modified version of your script that uses the after method: from time import time, sleep from Tkinter import * def empty_textbox(): textbox.delete("1.0", END) root ...


7

Have a look at the datetime package, it has everything you need. when you subtract one datetime from another, you get a timedelta object. You can use total_seconds() to get the duration in seconds and use division to convert it to hours and days. Then your only job then is to format it into a readable string.


6

I am aware of two methods I can use: currentTimeMillis() and nanoTime(). But I have learned that currentTimeMillis() is more accurate if I need the wall-clock time (i.e, as if I am measuring from the wall-clock how much time the execution took. Not the processing time). That's only partly accurate. Both functions return wall-clock time, and not CPU ...


6

std::chrono::steady_clock can be used to measure time, and takes into account changes to the system clock.


5

Pass start time to second form private void StartButton_Click(object sender, EventArgs e) { Form2 frm = new Form2(DateTime.Now); frm.Show(); this.Hide(); } And then use it public partial class Form2 : Form { private DateTime startTime; public Form2(DateTime startTime) { InitializeComponent(); this.startTime = ...


4

You need to check each part and then append stringFormat = [NSString stringWithFormat: @"%d", [elapsedTimeUnits year] > 0 ? ([NSString stringWithFormat: @"%d year%@", [elapsedTimeUnits year], [elapsedTimeUnits year] == 1 ? @"" : "s"]) : @""]; stringFormat = [NSString stringWithFormat: @"%@%@", stringFormat, [elapsedTimeUnits month] > 0 ? ([NSString ...


4

Depending on your needs, it can be as easy as: time_t start = time(NULL); // long running process printf("time elapsed: %d\n", (time(NULL) - start)); I guess you need to tell how you plan this to be logged (file or console) and what is the precision you need (seconds, ms, us, etc). "time" gives it in seconds.


4

I'd convert the submitted date into a datetime, then use something like https://gist.github.com/207624 to convert the datetime to a humanized string.


4

Use monotonic time, which represents time since some point: http://linux.die.net/man/3/clock_gettime int64_t get_monotonic_timestamp(void) { struct timespec ts; clock_gettime(CLOCK_MONOTONIC, &ts); return (int64_t)ts.tv_sec * 1000000 + ts.tv_nsec / 1000; }


3

SQL Server doesn't support the SQL standard interval data type. Your best bet is to calculate the difference in seconds, and use a function to format the result. The native function CONVERT() might appear to work fine as long as your interval is less than 24 hours. But CONVERT() isn't a good solution for this. create table test ( id integer not null, ...


3

UPDATED: Correctly calculate a timespan in SQL Server, even if more than 24 hours: -- Setup test data declare @minDate datetime = '2012-12-12 20:16:47.160' declare @maxDate datetime = '2012-12-13 15:10:12.050' -- Get timespan in hh:mi:ss select cast( (cast(cast(@maxDate as float) - cast(@minDate as float) as int) * 24) /* hours over 24 */ ...


3

You should not use the Date class for it, because a date is an instant of time, but you are using it as a duration. Please read carefully joda time documentation about it. And then you could use Period and PeriodFormatter for you task. Or write something similar if you don't want use the library.


3

I use the following code snippet in long-running scripts. The timer runs in a function (separate process) which will be killed (trap) if the main process is terminated by a keybord interrupt. The output shows the time elapsed from the start of the timer: ... working [hh:mm:ss] 00:07:58 The snippet: #=== FUNCTION ...


3

so how to calculate the elapsed time, with out changing the varchar type of field in my db? You can cast it, but you'd be better off having that as a datetime to start with. cast(endtime as datetime) - cast(starttime as datetime) -- yields an interval


3

You should use an NSTimer to do this. Try the code: - (void)text1; { buttonLabel.text = @" "; } - (void)text2; { buttonLabel.text = @"STOP"; } - (IBAction)buttonPressed:(id)sender; { if ([buttonLabel.text isEqualToString:@"START"]) { int startTime = arc4random() % 10; // Find the random period of time to wait [NSTimer ...


3

You should set it to Stopwatch.GetTimestamp(); See this MSDN example


3

I would recommend using the boost timer library . It is platform agnostic, and is as simple as: #include <boost/timer/timer.hpp> boost::timer t; // do some stuff, up until when you want to start timing t.restart(); // do the stuff you want to time. std::cout << t.elapsed() << std::endl; Of course t.elapsed() returns a double that you ...


3

I can't explain the issue, but I suspect the - operation returns the result in an unexpected format (maybe including microseconds or tenths?) I would use TIMEDIFF(). returns expr1 – expr2 expressed as a time value. expr1 and expr2 are time or date-and-time expressions, but both must be of the same type.


3

Just convert the start and end times to minutes since the start of the day (at midnight). For p.m., just add 12 to the hour before converting to minutes. Then subtract and convert back to hours and minutes for the elapsed time.


3

Its certainly not useless, it is self documenting code that means anybody reading it immediately understands that you want to change the interval on the first run. If you skipped the if and just set the interval every time it might not be obvious why you were doing this. As far as efficiency is concerned I doubt you'd notice a difference but of course if you ...


3

Isn't it VideoView's getCurrentPosition() what you are looking for? To change the contents of your TextView (or whatever yo want to use), I would set a Timer, with enough frecuency to update your "subtitle". Its TimerTask could get the playback time with that getCurrentPosition(), and use a Map to store messages values and the time as the key. Here it's ...


2

I tried the basic countdown and it works. <html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml"> <head runat="server"> <title></title> <style type="text/css"> @import "css/jquery.countdown.css"; </style> <script type="text/javascript" ...


2

Easy: $start_time = '11:10'; $end_time = '18:55'; $start_time = explode(':', $start_time); $end_time = explode(':', $end_time); $elapsed_time = $end_time[0]*60+$end_time[1]-$start_time[0]*60-$start_time[1]; // in minutes. $elapsed_hours = floor($elapsed_time/60); $elapsed_minutes = $elapsed_time-$elapsed_hours*60; print ...


2

In PHP: $json_time = '13:10'; $json_format = 'H:i'; $date = DateTime::createFromFormat($json_format, $json_time); $mysql_format = 'Y-m-d H:i:s'; echo "Format: $mysql_format; " . $date->format($mysql_format) . "\n"; echo $date->getTimestamp(); Yeilds: Format: Y-m-d H:i:s; 2011-06-08 13:10:00 1307495400


2

Depends on what sort of accuracy you want, my understanding is that clock and time_t are not accurate to the millisecond level. Similarly GetTickCount() is commonly used (MS docs say accurate to 10-15ms) but not sufficiently accurate for many purposes. I use QueryPerformanceFrequency and QueryPerformanceCounter for accurate timing measurements for ...


2

The art could use some work, but give this a try: #!/bin/bash ref_date='Thu Apr 19 17:07:39 CDT 2012' ref_sec=$(date -j -f '%a %b %d %T %Z %Y' "${ref_date}" +%s) update_inc=1 tput clear cat <<'EOF' [|] [|] _-'''''''''''''-_ / \ | | | | | ...


2

You can use System.Threading.Timer, in which you can set when first event should be fired, and the other ones


2

Instead of doing for (i = 0; i < 3; i++) { start_timer(&a); my_task(); stop_timer(&a); } do for (i = 0; i < 3; i++) { start_timer(&a); for (j = 0; j < 30000; j++) { my_task(); } stop_timer(&a); }



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