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52

Parallax is notoriously overpriced. They get away with it because they sell their stuff to educational institutions who don't know any better. The Arduino is a good start, go through a few of their examples (click 'Learning' on the Arduino site) and see what parts they require. My favorite hobby electronics online shop is sparkfun.com. They've got tons of ...


29

I'd definitely second the Arduino suggestion. They are cheap, there are several suppliers since the hardware is open source (although the name isn't), the IDE is free, you program them in C, and they're easy to hook up to just about anything. The board has 12 digital I/O pins (two of which double as serial communication pins) and six 12-bit A/D converter I/O ...


20

Well, the field of microcontrollers is quite big. You have several brands, each one sporting a full range of controllers, with varying degrees of capacity, complexity and ability. That said, the way to start with most microcontrollers is by reading the manufacturers' manual. As opposed to "normal" programming, where most programmers go by standards and ...


17

Tikz has a set of circuit macros. Furthermore, you can have a look to CircuitTikz. Here is the page on ctan.


15

Look into X10 (Edit: replaced original posters NSFW link with wikipedia page on X10)


13

I would recommend looking at the course The Elements of Computing Systems. Most of the material you need to complete the course is online and the textbook is inexpensive (I paid about 50.00 USD for my copy). The course takes you through constructing a basic computer system from the NAND gate on up. All of the labs are done in simulation software and it ...


12

I came the opposite direction, from an EE background I got into programming and went back to school to get a CS degree. I recommend starting out with something that combines the two in order to make the transition a little smoother. There are tons of hobbyist books like Making Things Talk, and Hardware Hacking Projects that make this easier. I also ...


12

Really good gesture detection with accelerometers is much harder than I expected. It's worse in a non-real-time system like Android. Be sure to timestamp your data coming in, and take a look at the histogram of this time data. You'll see that the timing is pretty erratic, and definitely not the 100Hz you're probably requesting. This Bachelors thesis ...


11

I recently started learning microcontroller programming using the Arduino. I purchased the Arduino Starter Pack from adafruit.com and walked through their introductory tutorials. Their kit comes with some basic electronics (LEDs, buttons, photoresistor) which give you some things to experiment right off the bat. If you already know C/C++ you will be able to ...


10

Check out the http://www.arduino.cc/. There are lots of project ideas based on it if you Google for it.


10

echo 121 > /dev/cu.usbmodem411 will write four bytes: 0x31 (meaning '1'), 0x32 (meaning '2'), 0x31 again, 0x0A (meaning a newline). If your goal is to write a single byte, with value 121, you would write this: echo -n $'\171' > /dev/cu.usbmodem411 where 171 is 121 expressed in base-8, and -n tells echo not to print a newline character. If that's ...


9

A processor operates what is known as a fetch-decode-execute cycle. Machine code instructions are fairly low-level (i.e. they don't do all that much in a single instruction). For example, adding two numbers would have a sequence of instructions with semantics like: Load a pointer to the address of operand 1 into register 1 Load the value stored at the ...


9

An arduino board seems like overkill for something this specific, espeacially if you aren't going to be using it with conjunction with anything else. Plus you are going to have to buy a variety of components or an arduino shield (specifically the relay shield) so it'll quickly add up, especially if you don't want to solder (you will be looking at about ...


9

@minhaz's link got me started in a long quest to understand cellular networking in the Network Layer side of things. So here goes: This question turns out to be mainly about how 3G networking is implemented. Answering the central question: "So how can GCM receive messages while in the 'Idle State'" can answer all the questions above. Short Answer Yes, ...


8

This goes back to the original IBM PC. The engineers that designed it needed a cheap way to generate a stable frequency. And turned to crystals that were widely in use at the time, used in any color TV in the USA. A crystal made to run an oscillator circuit at the color burst frequency in the NTSC television standard. Which is 315/88 = 3.579545 ...


8

You might find this a bit more high-level versus "down to the metal" but I've found the whole programmable microcontroller scene to be a great place to make the bridge between programming and hardware. The Arduino. What can't you do with this thing! http://www.arduino.cc/ Limor aka Lady Ada of AdaFruit has a number of mini-lessons on using the thing that ...


8

You could look at an implementation of Spice, such as http://embedded.eecs.berkeley.edu/pubs/downloads/spice/index.htm or http://ngspice.sourceforge.net/ . Spice is a very old and very popular modelling program, so whether you end up using it or doing your own thing, it's an important reference point.


7

The BlackWidow and YellowJacket boards are simply an Arduino board with the Wi-Fi functionality of the WiShield built in. Therefore, any documentation or reviews of the WiShield should apply to the other two devices. If you already have an Arduino, the WiShield is all you need to get up and running. However, if you purchasing, the BlackWidow or YellowJacket ...


7

The programming language used on the Arduino ( http://www.arduino.cc/ ) is C++. Not sure if this is what you mean, this is a mix between microcontroller programming and hobby electronics :). Loads of fun though.


7

Take a good hard look at Arduino. It's a good introduction to using Atmel ATMega microcontrollers. It's coded in a language similar to C++ called Processing. Sample commands: Check if a button is pressed, and if it is, turn an LED on. Button is on pin 3 (to ground), 4 is to LED. if(digitalRead(3) == HIGH){ digitalWrite(4, HIGH); } Blink an LED. ...


7

Get a USB traffic light and a USB extension cord. I gravitate toward the simplest solution possible. Should be pretty easy to write some software to drive it.


6

Ok so if I understand you, all of the hardware is done already? So, your system has a command input that is a current level in amperes (specified by say a double precision floating point number in software) and the output of the controller is a voltage that controls hardware that draws current, your plant is the circuit and the feedback is probably an 8, ...


6

Programming for embedded systems like you mention is usually done in C or C++. Toys like the one you mention are mostly 8 bit microcontrollers with limited ram and rom, because they have to be cheap. You will need to know the platform you want to target. If you have a specific toy you want to hack, find out the micro used in it. Hopefully, it is not a ...


6

Assuming you have an uncompressed 8-bit 22.1 kHz mono wave file: 1) Strip out the header 2) Every 1/22,100th second: 2.1) Read 8 bits 2.2) Use a DAC to convert it to the speaker's voltage range 2.3) Send it to the speaker This will give you [22.1 kHz/8 bits/mono] quality sound and is a simple way to play realistic samples. All that frequency ...


6

Both inputs connected to both inputs of a NAND gate? This sounds like a short circuit between both inputs. After all you don't need any gate for that kind of "OR gate". In practice connecting the inputs of a NAND results in a NOT. And having two NOTs in sequence is ID. It does nothing (only in a logical way, you can use this construct for different things ...


6

FPGAs are not programmed like an EPROM - their internals are completely volatile. In system use, they are 'configured' from some other non-volatile memory. For example, many can interface directly to a standard serial flash device to load that configuration. This non-volatile memory is the device which you need to "program" in some fashion. For example: ...


6

Let's look at the science. Six months on a small battery? We'll need one with low self discharge characteristics and high capacity. A 3.6 V LI-Ion might do the trick. Checking out the Small Battery Companies website, we could use a Prismatic Li-Ion 14 mm x 34 mm x 47 mm that has 1800 mAh. That is about the size you mention. ...


5

Can it take floating point? function convertScale($handVal) { return $handVal * 165.0 / 180.0; } If not, rounding to nearest integer is hopefully okay: function convertScale($handVal) { return round($handVal * 165.0 / 180.0); } ---Edit--- As alluded to in comments, a 3-digit string is easily provided by: function convertScale($handVal) { ...


5

I'd very much suggest that you read the book Code, it gives a detailed history of how the computer evolved from different systems. It's very engaging and will explain to you how things evolved from morse code through to a simple adding machine and then on to some assembly. It should give you a picture of exactly how machine instructions are interpretted and ...


5

This device "IP Power 9258" should work for you, it is an ethernet comtrolled power bar. It is similar to the device used in this project "Red Bear Alert!" - The Hudson Bear Lamps. Here is a link if you want to try it on your own uSocket.



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