Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

5

166 RawElfSymbol *currSymb = symbolTabSec; (gdb) p *currSymb $8 = {name = 623313010, addr = 540682099, size = 1931505518, type_and_bind = 117 'u', ignored = 99 'c', section_tag = 8296} At this point in gdb session line 166 was not executed yet. What you see is random garbage values stored at some uninitialized currSymb address. (gdb) next 167 ...


3

You're running into kernel limitations on where pages can be mapped by userspace applications; these restrictions are intended to prevent certain kernel exploits from working. The minimum mappable address is set by the vm.mmap_min_addr sysctl value, and is usually at least 4096 (i.e, 0x1000). For details, see: https://wiki.debian.org/mmap_min_addr (The ...


3

In the callq N, text instructions the N appears to be the address to call, and the text appears to be the label assigned to that address. So, 0 is the same thing as <_ZL8privatefii> and 14 is the same thing as <_ZL9privatef2v>.


2

I am not sure your question always make sense. Details are implementation specific (operating system and compiler and compilation flags specific). First, a compiler which sees both "abcd" and "cd" literal strings in the same translation unit is permitted (but not required) to share their storage and use "abcd"+2 as the second one. See this answer. Then, ...


2

You are trying to read 64 bit elf header to 32 bit header causing the problem. Try to use this, typedef struct elf64_hdr { unsigned char e_ident[16]; /* ELF "magic number" */ Elf64_Half e_type; Elf64_Half e_machine; Elf64_Word e_version; Elf64_Addr e_entry; /* Entry point virtual address */ Elf64_Off e_phoff; /* Program header table file ...


2

What is the (correct) way to access the memory image of a process from the corresponding ELF core dump file? It's not entirely trivial. Also, the specific address may not even be in the core to begin with. Let's consider an example: // t.c #include <stdio.h> #include <stdlib.h> int main() { int i = 42; printf("&i = %p\n", ...


2

As by C Standard, the hosted environment (that I guess is your case as/if you want to use standard library headers*) forces you to keep with main function. From C11 ยง5.1.2.2.1/p1 (emphasis mine): The function called at program startup is named main. The implementation declares no prototype for this function. It shall be defined with a return type of ...


1

From document you mentioned: R_386_RELATIVE The link editor creates this relocation type for dynamic linking. Its offset member gives a location within a shared object that contains a value representing a relative address. The dynamic linker computes the corresponding virtual address by adding the virtual address at which the shared object was ...


1

Sounds like you want a "linker map". The ld(1) option is "--print-map". But calling through GCC you'll probably have to do something like: gcc -Wl,--print-map -o a.out c.c It comes out the standard output and looks pretty complete.


1

Here is how you can do it: cat t.c #include <stdio.h> #include <stdlib.h> int main() { printf("Hello\n"); return 0; } gcc -g t.c gdb -q --args /usr/lib64/ld-linux-x86-64.so.2 ./a.out (gdb) start Function "main" not defined. Starting program: /usr/lib64/ld-linux-x86-64.so.2 ./a.out Hello [Inferior 1 (process 7134) exited normally] So far ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible