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Read more about ELF, in particular elf(5), and about the execve(2) syscall. An ELF file may contain an interpreter. elf(5) mentions: PT_INTERP The array element specifies the location and size of a null-terminated pathname to invoke as an interpreter. This segment type is meaningful only for executable files (though it may occur ...


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You must provide the -m64 flag for the linker as well so it knows what type of binaries to expect.


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Archimedes called "heureka" when he found that at a location can only be one object. If your ELF binary must be at one location because you can't rebuild it for another location you have to relocate the loader itself. The non-relocatable ELF doesn't include enough Information to move it to a different address. You could probably write a decompiler that ...


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You should read in details Drepper's paper: how to write shared libraries - notably to understand why using LD_PRELOADis not enough. You may want to study the source code of the dynamic linker (ld-linux.so) inside your libc. You might try to change with mprotect(2) and/or mmap(2) and/or mremap(2) the relevant pages. You can query the memory mapping thru ...


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80482e0: ff 25 10 a0 04 08 jmp *0x804a010 This means "retrieve the 4-byte address stored at 0x804a010 and jump to it." 804a010: e6 82 out %al,$0x82 804a012: 04 08 add $0x8,%al Those 4 bytes will be treated as an address, 0x80482e6, not as instructions. 80482e0: ff 25 10 a0 04 ...


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ELF is divided into sections onto disk, but segments in memory. Basically the loading process means doing the section to segments mapping, and then process fixups. (including global tables like GOT) By symbol loading is a different way of loading. It probably does the first process, and then searches for symbol in special tables. Anyway the best free ...


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I have resorted to two methods for the requirement. The easiest was objdump. Convert the binary to asm format using objdump -S myexe > myexe.s and use grep for the most basic type of search. When my search requirements got advanced, for eg. find jmp instructions with pop instructions just before the jmp, i moved on to using ruby regexes instead of grep ...


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How can I find out from which shared library/shared object the strcp function is obtained? In general you can't: that library can change at runtime. For example, if I compile the following source: int strcpy(char *a, const char *src) { abort(); } $ gcc -fPIC -shared -o foo.so foo.c and then run your program like so: LD_PRELOAD=./foo.so /bin/less ...


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Any way to find out with line did it crash? Your libc.so.6 and libspice-server.so.1 are (apparently) fully-stripped. You'll want to install debuginfo packages for both libraries, and then use addr2line to translate addresses to symbol/file/line, like so: addr2line -fe /lib64/libc.so.6 0x7bc07 0x7d23a



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