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I am confused about the concept Position Independent Executable (PIE) and Position Independent code (PIC), and I guess they are not orthogonal. The only real difference between PIE and PIC is that you are allowed to interpose symbols in PIC, but not in PIE. Except for that, they are pretty much equivalent. You can read about symbol interposition here. ...


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You can do this a bit indirectly using sbrk(): #include <stdio.h> #include <stdlib.h> #include <unistd.h> int main(void) { sbrk(0xFFFFFFFF); printf("%p\n", malloc(1)); return 0; } This works by "allocating" 0xFFFFFFFF bytes at the very start, so that the next thing malloc() can allocate is a higher address.


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Yes addresses are odd because they are Thumb functions, which is a simple question, however why two tools report differently to me is a good question. readelf on purpose doesn't use BFD (unlike objdump) and mostly used to verify other tools against. Here: The difference between readelf and objdump: Both programs are capable of displaying the ...


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Nos provided, then deleted, the following correct answer: You can use the addr2line tool for this, which is part of binutils so it should already installed on your system. addr2line -e /path/to/libfoo.so.0 -fp 0x1c4853 The output should be something like e.g. some_function at /dev/src/main.c:11


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A detailed description of how an ELF linker works by the author of GNU gold can be found in a series of blog posts starting here. (Runtime) loaders do not use any sections of the ELF files (a valid ET_DYN or ET_EXEC ELF file can have all section headers stripped). They only use segments. I don't know of any good description of an ELF loader, but here is a ...


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Memory leak can be be evaluated with core dump as given by paxdiablo. Also if some pattern is repeated in corefile then it can evaluated as given below: 1. I have taken a sample c++ example: class Base { public: virtual void fun(){} virtual void xyz(){} virtual void lmv(){} virtual void abc(){} }; class Derived: public ...


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The problem was that the test program shellprogram.c was not correct for the purposes I wanted to use it for, as mentioned by @Iwillnotexist Idonotexist. You can't get data executed due to memory protection enforced by the OS. The final result that worked (making the data section containing the char[] shellcode readable & executable) was calling: ...


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__init is a Linux kernel macro, it is somewhat similar to the normal gcc __attribute__(constructor), with the additional feature that it's also interpreted as a hint that the code can be freed once it has run (modules only, platform dependent). In a "normal" gcc/glibc C program, libc takes care of calling any init (and fini) functions, in the kernel you need ...



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