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GNU libc provides a dladdr function for this exact purpose. However, it only works on functions, not variables. #define _GNU_SOURCE /* See feature_test_macros(7) */ #include <dlfcn.h> int dladdr(void *addr, Dl_info *info); The function dladdr() takes a function pointer and tries to resolve name and file where it is ...


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A page is the smallest mappable unit of virtual memory. If you are not familiar with the basics, see the wikipedia article on virtual memory. On common systems, the size of a page is 4096 bytes, or 0x1000 in hex. A "text page" contain executable code; a "data page" contains data. These must be mapped at fixed addresses so that offsets in the code are ...


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Yes, it's possible, but definitely not easy. There is even a supported kernel facility "kprobes" that allows you to insert calls to your own code from specified locations (see Documentation/kprobes.txt). If inserting calls to your own code is insufficient, I think you would need to use the same sort of mechanisms as kprobe: patching the desired location by ...


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You can use ldd -r exe command to list the shared library dependencies. Here is my output for your example without the f function: $ LD_LIBRARY_PATH=. ldd -r ./exe linux-vdso.so.1 (0x00007ffcfa7c3000) libshared.so => ./libshared.so (0x00007f303a02e000) libc.so.6 => /lib64/libc.so.6 (0x0000003e26c00000) ...


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So, let me see if I understand what you're doing properly. You've modified the CPU (running in an emulator?) so that instruction 0xF1 does some sort of cryptographic thing. You want to arrange for load_elf_binary to invoke this instruction on return, with registers set properly for this instruction to do its magic. Somehow custom sections are involved. ...


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Question I: You need to start with a simplified view. For question 1, think about it in terms of logical memory rather than virtual memory. Let's say we are doing this in 32bit mode, you will have a theoretical maximum of 3/4ths of 2^32 logical memory available to your process. When your new process loads an executable, that entire address space is going ...


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The answer is pretty easy - LLVM is not executing anything behind the scenes. It's a job of the C runtime (CRT) to perform all necessary preparations before running main(). This includes (but not limited to) to static ctors and similar things. The runtime is usually informed about these objects via addresses of constructores being emitted in the special ...


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Which sections(.data, .rodata, .bss, etc) can be used for storing pointers in an ELF executable Is this homework? If not, what are you really trying to achieve? Each of .data, .rodata and .bss can store pointers. So can .text. ELF allows for arbitrarily named sections, so a full list of sections that can store pointers is impossible (because it's ...


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I don't think this can be done with just ld and a linker script. Given this line from here: If a file name matches more than one wildcard pattern, or if a file name appears explicitly and is also matched by a wildcard pattern, the linker will use the first match in the linker script. It sounds like the linker script will only put the data (or ...


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What you want to look at is the Binary File Descriptor library specifically the symbol handling functions. libbfd provides a common set of functions for manipulating and reading various object formats. It does this by providing an abstract view of object files and then has specific back ends to handle the details of specific object types and architectures. ...


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C is a fully-compiled language. The names and types and other info about variables are generally discarded in the compilation process. An exception is that most compilers will produce an executable with debugging information included, so that a live debugger has access to this information. This info is totally OS-specific, and even compiler-specific, and ...


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As you've already stated in your comment, the p_filesz field corresponds to the segment's size in bytes in the file, whereas the p_memsz is the segment's in-memory size. The reason why p_memsz is greater than (or equal to) p_filesz is that a loadable segment may contain a .bss section, which contains uninitialized data. It would be wasteful to store this ...


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1.) In load_elf_binary 850 /* Do this so that we can load the interpreter, if need be. We will 851 change some of these later */ 852 retval = setup_arg_pages(bprm, randomize_stack_top(STACK_TOP), 853 executable_stack); 2.) In swap partition / file


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DWARF is the debug information and tries to reflect the relation of the original source code. Taking following code as an example static int one() { // something return 1; } int main(int ac, char **av) { return one(); } After you compile it using gcc -O3 -g, the static function one will be inlined into main. So when you use readelf -s, you will ...


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I ran into this same problem today when learning about linker scripts. SIZEOF_HEADERS was the magic bullet to solve it. Here is my simple source file to build the object I'm linking: .section .text .global _start _start: mov $1, %eax mov $8, %ebx int $0x80 With the following linker script, I get a 2+ MB executable: SECTIONS { . = ...



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