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51

Alex, Just to clarify the naming, they are both functions. One is a named function and the other is an anonymous one. But you are right, they work somehow differently and I am going to illustrate why they work like that. Let's start with the second, fn. fn is a closure, similar to a lambda in Ruby. We can create like this: x = 1 fun = fn y -> x + y end ...


23

You have to name your nodes and use the same cookie on both nodes. In machine 1: iex --name node1@machine1.com --cookie a_cookie_string In machine 2: iex --name node2@machine2.com --cookie a_cookie_string Now the two machines can communicate. To test it, you can do something like this, on machine1: iex(node1@machine1.com)1> Node.connect ...


20

Elixir reuses most of the compilation stack used by Erlang, so our bytecode is in general very close to the one you would get by compiling Erlang itself. In many cases, it just isn't the same because we include some reflection functions like __info__/1 in the compiled module. Also, there is no conversion cost in between calling Erlang and Elixir and it will ...


17

Quoting Alexei Sholik on the elixir-talk mailing list: Normally, &1 only makes into a function the primitive expression it belongs to. In other words, it walks up the AST to the first parent and replaces that parent with a fn. Expressions like this work just fine: &1 * &1 &1 + 2 &1 * &2 But it can't be involved in a more complicated expression. ...


16

Check Integer.parse/1 and Float.parse/1.


13

Short answer: no way to know for sure without also knowing the contents of your source file :) There are a few ways to run Elixir code. This answer will be an overview of various workflows that can be used with Elixir. When you are just getting started and want to try things out, launching iex and evaluating expressions one at a time is the way to go. ...


12

The data in Elixir is still immutable, but there are couple of shorthands, that let you type less or don't worry about finding new names. In Erlang, you could often see code like this: SortedList = sort(List), FilteredList = filter(SortedList), List3 = do_something_with(FilteredList), List4 = another_thing_with(List3) In Elixir, you could just write: ...


11

Since 0.10.3 you need to put the partial application between parentheses preceded by the & operator. You won't have any trouble with this version: iex> square = &(&1 * &1) iex> square.(5) 25 iex> cube = &(&1 * &1 * &1) iex> cube.(5) 125


11

Webmachine - I don't know. It is pretty heavy weight for mine taste and I don't use it. jiffy - Good choice. Pretty fast and I use it a lot. poolboy - I don't heard about it and I'm around Erlang for several years. I definitely would use cowboy for anything which I would expect high-performance or yaws for some more rock solid but still performing good. For ...


10

Usually we use tuples to hold a fixed amount of data, known up-front. So if you want to print the contents of a tuple, I would recommend doing: def print_tuple({ foo, bar, baz }) do IO.puts foo <> bar <> baz end If the tuple you want to print has a dynamic size, it is very likely you want to use a list instead. You can convert the elements ...


10

If what you have is an arbitrary list, then you can use Enum.join, but if it's for just two, explicit string concatenation should be easier to read "StringA" <> " " <> "StringB" However, often you don't need to have it as a single string in memory if you're going to output it through e.g. the network. In that case, it can be advantageous to ...


10

No, there is no way to test them via ExUnit. I personally avoid testing private functions because usually you end up testing implementation instead of behaviour and those tests fail as soon as you need to change the code. Instead, I test the expected behaviour via the public functions, breaking them in small, consistent chunks.


10

Is it an abstraction layer between the two Yes, exactly! Plug is meant to be a generic adapter for different web servers. Currently we support just Cowboy but there is work to support others. Plug also defines how different components should be plugged together. Similar to Rack in Ruby, WSGI in Python, Ring in Clojure, and so on.


10

There's even a third kid on the block, HashDict. It's there for the case where you need to handle a large number of elements, since the other implementations tend to perform poorly in such a scenario. Here's a quick comparison chart: ┌──────────────┬────────────┬──────────┐ │ Keyword List │ Map/Struct │ HashDict │ ...


10

You can't concatenate tuples. The only reason is that you are not supposed to use them as such. Most of tuple usage requires knowing their size and things get blurrier if you can concatenate them. Furthermore, concatenating tuples requires copying both tuples in memory, which is not efficient. In other words, if you want to concatenate tuples, you may have ...


9

You can use apply/3 which is just a wrapper around :erlang.apply/3. It simply invokes the given function from the module with an array of arguments. Since you are passing arguments as the module and function names you can use variables. apply(:lists, :nth, [1, [1,2,3]]) apply(module_name, method_name, [1, array]) If you want to understand more about how ...


9

defmodule MatchStick do def doMatch("a" <> rest) do 1 end def doMatch(_) do 0 end end You need to use the string concatenation operator seen here Example: iex> "he" <> rest = "hello" "hello" iex> rest "llo"


9

You cannot re-open a module. Since Elixir is a compiled language, the way from source code to an executable representation is one-way. The mechanisms that alter code, such as macros, are evaluated during compilation time. However, Elixir allows you to do hot code swapping, i. e. you can replace a compiled module during runtime. I think this has some ...


8

Look at binary:split/2/3 in the module binary. For example with binary:split(String, <<"\n">>).


8

It is not possible to recur on anonymous functions in Elixir. Erlang 17 (currently a release candidate) adds this possibility to Erlang and we plan to leverage it soon. Right now, the best approach is to define a module function and pass it around: def neural_bias([i|input],[w|weights], acc) do neural(input,weights,i*w+acc) end def neural_bias([], ...


8

pid <- msg was removed, please send pid, msg instead.


8

The question mark preceding a character returns its codepoint, it's mentioned in this section of the getting started guide: http://elixir-lang.org/getting_started/6.html#6.1-utf-8-and-unicode


8

I suspect this compiles since <= is left associative, so a <= b <= c is the same as (a <= b) <= c. You can even verify this in the shell: iex(1)> quote(do: 1 <= 2 <= 3) {:<=, [context: Elixir, import: Kernel], [{:<=, [context: Elixir, import: Kernel], [1, 2]}, 3]} Consequently, 1 <= 2 <= 3 will amount to true <= 3 ...


8

The simplest approach I can think of is via defdelegate iex(1)> defmodule Foo do ...(1)> def foo, do: :foo ...(1)> ...(1)> defdelegate bar, to: __MODULE__, as: :foo ...(1)> end iex(2)> Foo.foo :foo iex(3)> Foo.bar :foo Note that this defines another function bar/0 which invokes foo/0.


8

There's no direct way to get the type of a variable in Elixir/Erlang. You usually want to know the type of a variable in order to act accordingly; you can use the is_* functions in order to act based on the type of a variable. Learn You Some Erlang has a nice chapter about typing in Erlang (and thus in Elixir). The most idiomatic way to use the is_* ...


7

Are you on a Mac? You could try Command+K. That usually works for me.


7

You can use def setup with the meta has just for this. Example: defmodule DeckTest do use ExUnit.Case setup do {:ok, cards: [:ace, :king, :queen] } end test "the truth", meta do assert meta[:cards] == [:ace, :king, :queen] end end Here's some more info


7

It is not related to the spawn call. :) Every time you compile the file, after the first time, the modules are being redefined because a previous version already existed. There is nothing wrong in this case, the warning is there for the cases you accidentally redefine a module you did not expect to.


7

Elixir files generally have .ex extension. And if you are not planning to compile it, we recommend using the .exs file. We cover those differences in our getting started guide. Assuming you write the file above to "mod.exs", one of the ways to achieve what you want is: elixir -r mod.exs -e "MyModule.print"


7

As you can see here, identifiers that start with uppercase letters are treated as atom aliases. In your case, Foo is an alias of :'Elixir.Foo' which is an atom.



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