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411

You can use viewport value instead of ems, pxs or pts. 1vw = 1% of viewport width 1vh = 1% of viewport height 1vmin = 1vw or 1vh, whichever is smaller 1vmax = 1vw or 1vh, whichever is larger h1 { font-size: 5.9vw; } h2 { font-size: 3.0vh; } p { font-size: 2vmin; } from Css-tricks: http://css-tricks.com/viewport-sized-typography/


153

I'm afraid that doesn't work as you are thinking here. The font-size won't respond like this when resizing the browser window. Instead they respond to the browser zoom/type size settings, such as if you press ctrl and + together on the keyboard while in the browser. You would have to look at using media queries to reduce the font-size at certain intervals ...


54

It's equal to the computed value of the ‘font-size’ property of the element on which it is used. Inheritance runs down the document tree. To answer your question, it would be 0.5 times the 2em, which in turn would be 2 times whatever the h1's parent's computed font-size is. phew. It's also important to note that if you use em on other CSS properties, for ...


28

This seems to work: $(window).width() / parseFloat($("body").css("font-size"));


26

Use CSS media specifiers (that's what they [zurb] use) for responsive styling: @media only screen and (max-width: 767px) { h1 { font-size: 3em; } h2 { font-size: 2em; } }


25

EM is an algorithm for maximizing a likelihood function when some of the variables in your model are unobserved (i.e. when you have latent variables). You might fairly ask, if we're just trying to maximize a function, why don't we just use the existing machinery for maximizing a function. Well, if you try to maximize this by taking derivatives and ...


23

Because the em tag is inline and it's line height cannot be lower than its parent div if the line-height of the parent is 10px for example than you can decrease the em tag's too.


21

Despite what you may read elsewhere, there is no direct relationship between em and px. As one of the links states: the "em" value is based on the width of the uppercase M So it's going to be different for every font. A narrow font might have the same height (in px) as an extended font, but the em size will be different. EDIT three years later: ...


21

The parent element of body is html, which uses a default font size matching the browser's default font size setting (typically 16px).1 This applies even if you set a font-size value in ems on both body and html. So if you did this: html, body { font-size: 2em; } Then, assuming a default font size of 16px as set by the user, html will have a font size of ...


20

If you don't mind to use a jQuery solution you can try TextFill plugin jQuery TextFill resizes text to fit into a container and makes font size as big as possible. https://github.com/jquery-textfill/jquery-textfill


18

Isn't 1em supposed to be 16px across all browsers? Not necessarily: One 'Em'(1em) is equal to the height of the capital letter "M" in the default font size. When applied in CSS, the Em represents either the user's default font size, or the size of the parent element's font size, if one is available. So while the default font size is 16px, perhaps ...


17

Here is a straight-forward recipe to understand the Expectation Maximisation algorithm: 1- Read this EM tutorial paper by Do and Batzoglou. 2- You may have question marks in your head, have a look at the explanations on this maths stack exchange page. 3- Look at this code that I wrote in Python that explains the example in the EM tutorial paper of item 1: ...


14

The M-principle that an em is based on the letter M and is dependent on font is an often stated myth!! W3c em documentation very succinctly describes exactly how ems and pixels relate. Using the letter M to compute font-sizes is at the very least overly complicated and unnecessary. The 'em' unit is equal to the computed value of the 'font-size' ...


14

I think your question is very important. Since the classes of display resolutions are rapidly increasing, using em positioning to support wide range of screen resolutions is a really appealing approach. But no matter how hard you try to keep everything in em -- sometimes you get a pixel value maybe from JQuery drag and drop or from another library, and you ...


14

Technically the term "EM" is a bit underspecified, but I assume you refer to the Gaussian Mixture Modelling cluster analysis technique, that is an instance of the general EM principle. Actually, EM cluster analysis is not a classifier. I know that some people consider clustering to be "unsupervised classification", but actually cluster analysis is something ...


13

For font sizes: em and % are both relative to the font size of the parent element (i.e. 2em and 200% always give same result) ems have a history in typography (although a CSS em is not the same as a typographic em) Browser implementations of CSS have fewer bugs with % than with em For everything else (e.g. the width of an element): em is relative to ...


13

The following seems to do as you require, though it's based on the font-size of the parent, and of the element itself, being returned in px: function px2em(elem) { var W = window, D = document; if (!elem || elem.parentNode.tagName.toLowerCase() == 'body') { return false; } else { var parentFontSize = parseInt(W....


12

There are several ways to achieve this Use media query but requires font sizes for several breakpoints body { font-size: 22px; } h1 { font-size:44px; } @media (min-width: 768) { body { font-size: 17px; } h1 { font-size:24px; } } Use dimensions in % or em. Just change the ...


11

Historically it is the width of an "M" in the font. Hence the name! In CSS2.1 it is defined to be the same as the font-size. In many cases it seems more natural to use em rather than points or pixels, because it is relative to the font size. For example you might define a text-column to have a width of 40em. If you later decide to change the font-size, the ...


10

I think what you are looking for is @mediaqueries. Em is not a magic-bullet unit that will resize based on the browser width. It is a relative unit. If you want any CSS to change based on the browser width, use @media queries. ems are useful in this case because you only have to change one value (body{font-size}) to scale all the rest of the page. Because ...


9

When 1em is applied to an element, it takes the default value of the browser (usually, 16px) or the font-size value of its parent, right? No, it takes its own font-size, computed based on its parent (or the default browser-supplied value). Since the browser-supplied font-size of h1 is 32 pixels, the resultant margin is 32 pixels. However, using ...


9

1em is equal to the font-size of the element in question. So when using it with margins, it will be equivalent to the font-size of the element you're applying the margin too.


8

Use this code: <html> <body> <p>This is 10em x 5em</p> <div style="width:10em; height:5em;"> <img style="width:10em; height:5em;" src="logo.png" /> </div> </body> </html> It works in Firefox 3.5, Internet Explorer 8 and Opera 10.0 Beta on Windows XP.


8

I've been playing around with ways to overcome this issue, and believe I have found a solution: If you can write your app for IE9+ and all other modern browsers that support CSS calc(), rem units, and vmin units, you can use this to achieve scaleable text without Media Queries: body { font-size: calc(0.75em + 1vmin); } Here is it in action: http://...


7

There's no specific relationship between em and px. It's computed based on the width of the "m" character for each font-face.


7

You can't sensibly interchange px and em sizes like that. A px size is an absolute value that will remain the same size regardless of where it is. An em size is relative to the parent element, thus 0.5em is half the size of the parent element. If that doesn't make much sense, consider the following piece of code: /* CSS */ span { font-size: 0.9em; } <!--...


7

When you use em values for line height, the value of the line height is computed, and it is that computed value which is also used by child elements. If you use a bare number instead, it is the ratio that is used for the calculation of child element line-heights. So use line-height:1.25; instead of line-height:1.25em;


7

That is because Chrome's default font-size is 12px. You should set the body and/or html element's font-size to 16px, like so: html, body { font-size: 16px; } This is assuming that there's no parent elements that change this font-size though, as em is a relative size to the nearest parent that sets a size. Check into rem if you want an absolutely ...


7

Look at the structure of the returned object (this should be documented in the help): > # simple mixture of normals: > x=c(rnorm(10000,8,2),rnorm(10000,17,4)) > xMix = normalmixEM(x, lambda=NULL, mu=NULL, sigma=NULL) Now what: > str(xMix) List of 9 $ x : num [1:20000] 6.18 9.92 9.07 8.84 9.93 ... $ lambda : num [1:2] 0.502 0.498 ...


6

Copy/Paste your css in JSFiddle to convert. code example: var regFindPX = new RegExp('(\\d+)px','g'); var reg3decPoints = new RegExp('(\.\\d{3}).*', ''); var css = 'css code'; var result; while ((result = regFindPX.exec(css)) !== null) { var px = parseInt(result[1]); var em = px / 16; em = em.toString().replace(reg3decPoints, '$1'); css = ...



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