Hot answers tagged

42

asm volatile("" ::: "memory"); creates a compiler level memory barrier forcing optimizer to not re-order memory accesses across the barrier. For example, if you need to access some address in a specific order (probably because that memory area is actually backed by a different device rather than a memory) you need to be able tell this to the compiler ...


37

Not all virtual (linear) addresses must be mapped to anything. If the code accesses unmapped page, the page fault is risen. The physical page can be mapped to several virtual addresses simultaneously. In the 4 GB virtual memory there are 2 sections: 0x0... 0xbfffffff - is process virtual memory and 0xc0000000 .. 0xffffffff is a kernel virtual memory. ...


34

**TODO** +editPic: Linux Kernel Developer -> (Ring Layer 0) +addSection: Kernel Virtualization Engine KERN_WARN_CODING_STYLE: Do not Loop unless you absolutely have to. Recommended Books for the Uninitialized void *i "Men do not understand books until they have a certain amount of life, or at any rate no man understands a deep book, ...


33

You can get the caller with __builtin_return_address(0). The caller's caller is __builtin_return_address(1) and so on. It's a GCC extension, documented in the gcc manual: http://gcc.gnu.org/onlinedocs/gcc/Return-Address.html Edit: I should probably point out, that gets you the address of the caller. If you want the function name you can print it with %pS, ...


28

request_mem_region tells the kernel that your driver is going to use this range of I/O addresses, which will prevent other drivers to make any overlapping call to the same region through request_mem_region. This mechanism does not do any kind of mapping, it's a pure reservation mechanism, which relies on the fact that all kernel device drivers must be nice, ...


24

First start by writing a generic kernel module. There are multiple places to look up for information but I found this link to be very useful. After you have gone through all examples specified there you can start writing your own Linux Driver Module. Please note, that you will not get away with just copy-pasting the example code and hope it will work, no. ...


23

I believe you are looking wrong at the problem - any update which is non atomic (e.g. dd a file system image, replace files in a directory) is broken by design - if the power goes off in the middle of an update the system is a brick and for embedded system, power can go off in the middle of an upgrade. I have written a white paper on how to correctly do ...


23

Here's my list: C essentials OOP/ C++ - classes, encapsulation, polymorphism, overloading/ overriding, templates Algorithms - search, sort, b-trees Design Patterns - factory, observer, singleton etc. Real Time Operating Systems - primitives (semaphore, mutex), scheduling techniques, user/ kernel space Linux fundamentals, driver writing, shell ...


21

Putting ARCH and CROSS_COMPILE in the Makefile doesn't work. You need to put them on the command line: make ARCH=arm CROSS_COMPILE=arm-none-linux-gnueabi-


20

sudo lshw -class disk will show you the available disks in the system


20

First you need a good understanding of electronics, an EE degree helps but is not necessarily required, depends on the market you are going into. You definitely need strong schematic reading skills, good schematics and bad ones. You definitely need strong datasheet and other reference manual skills. Most of these manuals have mistakes so you need some ...


18

The default Linux timeslice for realtime processes is defined in the Linux kernel as RR_TIMESLICE in include/linux/sched/rt.h. /* * default timeslice is 100 msecs (used only for SCHED_RR tasks). * Timeslices get refilled after they expire. */ #define RR_TIMESLICE (100 * HZ / 1000) Note that the actual quantum allocated for a particular ...


17

No, volatile is not harmful. In any situation. Ever. There is no possible well-formed piece of code that will break with the addition of volatile to an object (and pointers to that object). However, volatile is often poorly understood. The reason the kernel docs state that volatile is to be considered harmful is that people kept using it for synchronization ...


16

I assume your OMAP4 linux uses one of arch/arm/boot/dts/{omap4.dtsi,am33xx.dtsi} device-tree, thus it compiles drivers/spi/spi-omap2-mcspi.c (if you don't know about device-tree, read this). Then: the SPI master driver is done, it (most probably) registers with Linux SPI core framework drivers/spi/spi.c, it (probably) works fine on your OMAP4. You ...


15

C++ in general suffers no run time penalty over C - (except for a few things like RTTI). Except in a few odd circumstances the compiler should be able to determine which virtual function to call at compile time and so add no overhead. Edit: Ok with such a variety of compilers, CPUs, runtime libs, OSes there are some features of C++ that might create slower ...


15

CFS (which is default scheduler for processes) has no fixed timeslice, it is calculated at runtime depending of targeted latency (sysctl_sched_latency) and number of running processes. Timeslice could never be less than minimum granularity (sysctl_sched_min_granularity). Timeslice will be always between sysctl_sched_min_granularity and sysctl_sched_latency, ...


15

Format of /proc/mounts The 1st column specifies the device that is mounted. The 2nd column reveals the mount point. The 3rd column tells the file-system type. The 4th column tells you if it is mounted read-only (ro) or read-write (rw). The 5th and 6th columns are dummy values designed to match the format used in /etc/mtab. tmpfs /export/ftp/import tmpfs ...


14

Your configure arguments are not right for cross-compilation. To cross-compile with recent autoconf you just specify host and let it figure the rest out. So it would be more like this: ./configure --host=arm-linux-gnueabi I also had to modify the configure script by replacing "armv7*" with "arm*". You'll see where. However, there's another problem. The ...


14

The hardware provides a Memory Management Unit. It is a piece of circuitry which is able to intercept and alter any memory access. Whenever the processor accesses the RAM, e.g. to read the next instruction to execute, or as a data access triggered by an instruction, it does so at some address which is, roughly speaking, a 32-bit value. A 32-bit word can have ...


14

Even if traditional Bash arrays are not supported, it may still be possible to create array-like variables using the eval command built into the particular shell. The following example script is based on some scripting I did when using BusyBox in an embedded Linux project. BusyBox uses the Almquist shell (also known as A Shell, ash, and sh), which does ...


14

You can also check out Buildroot, http://buildroot.org. We have a default configuration for the Rasberry-Pi, and several contributors are working on the support for this platform.


14

This sequence is a compiler memory access scheduling barrier, as noted in the article referenced by Udo. This one is GCC specific - other compilers have other ways of describing them, some of them with more explicit (and less esoteric) statements. __asm__ is a gcc extension of permitting assembly language statements to be entered nested within your C code - ...


14

Linux is a general-purpose OS (GPOS); its application to embedded systems is usually motivated by the availability of device support, file-systems, network connectivity, and UI support. All these things can be available in an RTOS, but often with less broad support, or at additional cost or integration effort. Many RTOS are not full OS in the sense that ...


13

You can read /sys/bus/usb/devices/usb?/speed - it'll give you the bus speed of the root hub(s) in Mbps: either 1.5, 12, 480 or 5000. The first two indicate USB1 (low speed or full speed), the third USB2 and the fourth USB3.


13

The message you have shown indicates a failure to allocate memory for a kernel allocation, not a userspace allocation. It is a request for a 4MB (this is what order = 10 means) block of contiguous physical memory. This is a very large kmalloc() request, and it is not surprising that it fails (likely due to memory fragmentation rather than free memory). ...


13

You will need: 1 - Boards: I started with a beagleboard. A new beaglebone black is available now. There's a large support community for the beagles; many howto pages here and here, and ready to install images. You can also build the image yourself (step 3). These boards have most of the peripherals that you may need to play with, and can also be used as ...


12

Replace ARCH=arm CROSS_COMPILE=arm-none-linux-gnueabi by export ARCH:=arm export CROSS_COMPILE:=arm-none-linux-gnueabi- this will also work if you do not want to give these parameter command line each time.


12

uboot.bin is the bootloader, i.e. uboot, uImage.bin is the kernel image Usually, in embedded systems the NAND flash is partitioned in four parts: A partition for the bootloader (here goes uboot.bin) A small partition where uboot saves its environment variables A partition for the kernel (here goes uImage.bin) A partition for the rootfs



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible