Hot answers tagged

6

That's the Variant Form, which provides more information for those displays, that are capable of displaying with colour and other things. This chart gives you the difference between FE0F and FE0E: You could consider that the FE0E version is the unicode text version, and the FE0F version is with graphics (those which are capable will display graphically)...


5

Javascript uses UTF-16 (source) to manage strings. In UTF-16 there are 1,112,064 possible characters. Now, each character uses code points to be represented(*). In UTF-16 one code-point use two bytes (16 bits) to be saved. This means that with one code point you can have only 65536 different characters. This means some characters has to be represented with ...


4

128520 is the unicode scalar value of "😈": let text = "😈😀" let encoded = text.unicodeScalars.map { "&#" + String($0.value) + ";" }.joinWithSeparator("") print(encoded) // 😈😀


3

Actually you can just add them directly. @IBAction func pressed(sender: AnyObject) { let actionSheetController: UIAlertController = UIAlertController(title: "Are you sure?", message: "", preferredStyle: .Alert) let cancelAction: UIAlertAction = UIAlertAction(title: "😡 NO", style: .Cancel) { action -> Void in //Do your task } ...


2

In Unicode the value U+FE0F is called a variation selector. The variation selector in the case of emoji is to tell the system rendering the character how it should treat the value. That is, whether it should be treated as text, or as an image which could have additional properties, like color or animation. For emoji there are two different variation ...


2

\U0001F603 is a literal which is evaluated at compile time. You want a solution which can be executed at runtime. So you want to have a string with a dynamic unicode character. %C if the format specifier for a unicode character (unichar). [NSString stringWithFormat:@"Hi there! %C", (unichar)(0x01F600 + arc4random_uniform(10))]; unichar is too small for ...


2

The thing you're looking for isn't actually an h2 tag with the class Events, you're looking for a div tag that contains an h2 tag whose content is "Events". This should get you started: div_contents = soup2.find('h2', text='Events').findParent()


1

Use app:emojiSize attribute. This attribute will also work for EmojiTextView. (Here is source.) Or use EmojiTextView#setEmojiSize method. I am not sure. But the string that is taken by EmojiEditText#getText().toString() should contain unicode of emoji. So I think you can store this string to database and use it later. I Infer this from source code.


1

These libraries can help you to make your app. You can check this out 1.emojicon -A library to show emoji in TextView, EditText (like WhatsApp) for Android gradle compile 'com.rockerhieu.emojicon:library:<latest-version>' 2.XhsEmoticonsKeyboard -android emoticonsKeyboard support emoji and user-defined emoticon. easy to integrated into your ...


1

Please just consider this an addition to T.J. Crowder's answer - I don't have 50 rep so couldn't add as a comment :( You're escaping in html incorrectly, in Javascript backslashes (\) are used to escape but in HTML escaping is achieved by prefixing with ampersand (&) and suffixing with a semicolon (;). You can use HTML numeric character references: ...


1

The UTF-8 in the meta header just says how to read the text of the HTML response, it doesn't put the actual DOM document into some kind of mode that makes the document itself UTF-8. As for why your string works: A JavaScript string is a series of UTF-16 code units. So '\ud83d\ude00' defines the emoji at the JavaScript level. Then you use document.write to ...


1

You should let Alamofire do the necessary percent escaping of the request: let parameters = ["request": "setBio", "identification": identification, "bio": content] Alamofire.request(.POST, "removed/api.php", parameters: parameters, encoding: .URLEncodedInURL) .responseJSON { response in if let jsonStr = response.result.value { // ......


1

To use utf8mb4 in the application make sure you set it on the server level or before performing the query. There are 2 ways of doing it: Server level: add character_set_server=utf8mb4 to my.cnf or "set global character_set_server=utf8mb4" Before running query: "set names utf8mb4"


1

A step back, for a second: that number that you have, 1F660316, is a Unicode code point, which, to try to put it as simply as possible, is the index of this emoji in the list of all Unicode items. That's not the same thing as the bytes that the computer actually handles, which are the "encoded value" (technically, the code units. When you write the literal ...


1

This is how the data was originally generated... saveFile.write(json.dumps(data) + "\n") You should use json.loads() instead of .decode('unicode-escape') to read JSON text: #!/usr/bin/env python3 import json with open('tweets.txt', encoding='ascii') as file: for line in file: text = json.loads(line) print(text)


1

Your emoji 🙏 is represented as a surrogate pair, see also here for info about this particular glyph. Python cannot decode surrogates, so you'll need to look at exactly how your tweets.txt file was generated, and try encoding the original tweets, along with the emoji, as UTF-8. This will make reading and processing the text file much easier.


1

Ok. I figured out how to get it to work. Per user6526330's link. I first had to add the library commons-lang-2.5.jar and use the following for the EditText and TextView. //This converted the emoji code to utf8md4 for the server String cmttxt = newCmnt.getText().toString().trim(); String toServerUnicodeEncoded = StringEscapeUtils.escapeJava(cmttxt); //This ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible