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49

Please try this : Convert Emoji to unicode NSData *data = [strEmo dataUsingEncoding:NSNonLossyASCIIStringEncoding]; NSString *goodValue = [[NSString alloc] initWithData:data encoding:NSUTF8StringEncoding]; Very easy to convert unicode to Emoji NSData *data = [strEmo dataUsingEncoding:NSUTF8StringEncoding]; NSString *goodValue = [[NSString alloc] ...


27

You can simply set the property keyboardType of the UITextField or UITextView to UIKeyboardTypeASCIICapable. This disables the Emoji Keyboard for this UI element.


27

I found a very useful Emoticon Keyboard. This keyboard is not using Unicode sequences but rather just local image assets. I am thinking that this type of keyboard can only be useful within this app and not with other apps or Operating Systems. So instead I am replacing the ImageView containing an asset with a TextView containing a Unicode sequence. After ...


20

I think the preg_replace function is the simpliest solution. As EaterOfCode suggests, I read the wiki page and coded new regex since none of SO (or other websites) answers seemed to work for Instagram photo captions (API returning format) . Note: /u identifier is mandatory to match \x unicode chars. public static function removeEmoji($text) { ...


20

Please, please, never blindly delete chunks of text, especially not just because you can't see or understand them; it destroys information. Someone put them there for a reason; tweets containing emoji often don't make any sense without the emoji. For what it's worth, what you're seeing isn't really "binary"; it's most likely a small square with the Unicode ...


17

On Android you can make a BitMap font with the tutorial i found here. Then you can embed all your Emoji into that font. For making this on the BlackBerry you can use the FontFamily class. Here is a tutorial that explains how this works. Have fun! :-)


12

This is an Emoji character. See Emoji on Wikipedia and iOS: Understanding emoji for more information about these. They are special unicode characters that are very popular in countries like Japan. iOS has support for these throughout the OS, and you can see these characters on the Wikipedia page by visiting it with Safari. You can put these characters into ...


12

Emoji are generally rendered on your device by locally stored fonts licensed to the end user for use with their operating system. In this case copyright is irrelevant as your software is not distributing the artworks any more than my answer to this question is distributing the Arial typeface. If you need to render Emoji on a system that has no such font, ...


12

@mschluepmann, But set UIKeyboardTypeASCIICapable can not input Chinese And you can do it like below - (BOOL)textField:(UITextField *)textField shouldChangeCharactersInRange:(NSRange)range replacementString:(NSString *)string { if (IS_OS_7_OR_LATER) { if ([textField isFirstResponder]) { if ([[[textField textInputMode] ...


11

- (CGFloat)heightStringWithEmojis:(NSString*)str fontType:(UIFont *)uiFont ForWidth:(CGFloat)width { // Get text CFMutableAttributedStringRef attrString = CFAttributedStringCreateMutable(kCFAllocatorDefault, 0); CFAttributedStringReplaceString (attrString, CFRangeMake(0, 0), (CFStringRef) str ); CFIndex stringLength = CFStringGetLength((CFStringRef) ...


11

I have searched the web for many hours and I came to this solution which I want to share for other people: Use BLOB instead of text/varchar in the database fields. Like this, you can continue to use the database tables as you did before and the Emojis are shown properly. As soon as the hoster updates the MySQL version, I will continue with using UTF8MB4 as ...


11

\ue415 is part of the legacy encoding for emoji and is specific to certain Japanese carriers. SoftBank, NTT and docomo all had their own private emoji character sets. iOS 5 has moved to the newly specified Unicode 6.0 support for emoji character planes and <0001f604> is the Unicode code point for that character. The wikipedia entry about this ...


10

I use the below code to encode emoji character NSString *uniText = [NSString stringWithUTF8String:[textview.text UTF8String]]; NSData *msgData = [uniText dataUsingEncoding:NSNonLossyASCIIStringEncoding]; NSString *goodMsg = [[NSString alloc] initWithData:msgData encoding:NSUTF8StringEncoding] ; And the below code to decode and display in UILabel const ...


10

I was able to detect all emojis in iOS 5 and iOS 6 emoji keyboards using following method https://gist.github.com/4146056


10

You can use this library based on Hieu Rocker's library: https://github.com/ankushsachdeva/emojicon This is how it looks


10

Actually thats part of the user commit message For example git commit -m 'Fixed whatever, time for :beers:' It should appears a :beers: emoji Using Reto Comments, this is the list of emojis available.


9

You can use ⌃ ⌘ Space shortcut to show the symbols panels and just insert the emoji you're looking for directly without unicode: lbl.text = @"Happy to help you 😺"; (just copy the code abode to Xcode if you browser doesn't show the emoji)


9

After the first time I asked this question, I only got down votes. So I thought, probably there isn't any other plugin out there and I developed my own based on Emojiarea (which also Webogram uses). Because I didn't copy the code from Webogram, I didn't sort the icons yet but my solution works how I excepted it. The custom plugin can be found on my Github ...


8

You can use UITextInputMode to detect the current language of the currentInputMode -- emoji is considered a language. From the docs: An instance of the UITextInputMode class represents the current text-input mode. You can use this object to determine the primary language currently being used for text input. You can test for the emoji keyboard like ...


8

Apple is using a proprietary extension to the OpenType standard. Basically, they just store pre-rasterized color PNGs in a proprietary extension "block" within the TTF file (reference, corroboration). The only reason this works is because they also provide the full stack between that font extension and the screen (font rasterization, system graphics ...


8

Please use following function. public static Spannable getSmiledText(Context context, String text) { SpannableStringBuilder builder = new SpannableStringBuilder(text); int index;for (index = 0; index < builder.length(); index++) { for (Entry<String, Integer> entry : emoticons.entrySet()) { int length = ...


8

You are probably not using the correct encoding for your emoji characters. For instance in your example I think you are looking for something like this: label.text = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"%C", 0xe04f]; Have a look at this table to get the encodings you need.


7

The range you have selected is the Private Use Area, containing non-standard characters. Carriers used to encode emoji as different, inconsistent values inside this range. More recently, the emoji have been given standardised 'unified' codepoints. Many of these are outside of the Basic Multilingual Plane, in the block U+1F300–U+1F5FF, including your example ...


7

As per Apple's submission guidelines: 2.5 Apps that use non-public APIs will be rejected 2.6 Apps that read or write data outside its designated container area will be rejected There are no public APIs to add an additional keyboard. The files that store keyboard data are definitely stored outside of your app's container. In short: There is no way to ...


7

Unicode contains sections which specify emoji as "characters". They're regular characters, you only need a font which can display them. Also see the Unicode Emoji FAQ. In a text file, characters are basically encoded as numbers in the form of bytes. To display those visually on a computer screen you need a font which contains the visual glyph to render this ...


7

emoji's in range of U+1F600 to U+1F64F you can use this line in your script for sending with Json: text.replace(/[\u1F60-\u1F64]|[\u2702-\u27B0]|[\u1F68-\u1F6C]|[\u1F30-\u1F70]{\u2600-\u26ff]/g, "");


7

Karol S already provided a solution, but the reason might not be clear: "\u1F600" is actually "\u1F60" followed by "0": "\u1F60" # => "ὠ" "\u1F600" # => "ὠ0" You have to use curly braces for code points above FFFF: "\u{1F600}" #=> "😀" Therefore the character class [\u1F600-\u1F6FF] is interpreted as [\u1F60 0-\u1F6F F], i.e. it matches ...


7

From "3 Grapheme Cluster Boundaries" in the "Standard Annex #29 UNICODE TEXT SEGMENTATION": (emphasis added): A legacy grapheme cluster is defined as a base (such as A or カ) followed by zero or more continuing characters. One way to think of this is as a sequence of characters that form a “stack”. The base can be single characters, or be any ...


6

You are not using the correct notation for non-BMP unicode points; you want to use \U0001FFFF, a capital U and 8 digits: myre = re.compile(u'[' u'\U0001F300-\U0001F5FF' u'\U0001F600-\U0001F64F' u'\U0001F680-\U0001F6FF' u'\u2600-\u26FF\u2700-\u27BF]+', re.UNICODE) This can be reduced to: myre = re.compile(u'[' ...


6

Thank you @SergiSolanellas! Here's a version that takes an attributedString, shortening the method because the text and font are already set. // // Given an attributed string that may have emoji characters and the width of // the display area, return the required display height. // - (CGFloat)heightForAttributedStringWithEmojis:(NSAttributedString ...



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