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0

I could have read the documentation once more, I still would have misread the part where the default output encoding is based on internal. Thank you.


0

It looks very wrong, but it's documented: If you don't set the output-encoding in the preferences array, it falls back to iconv.internal_encoding, instead of iconv.output_encoding. Looking through the iconv functions, it appears that they all use the internal coding as fallback value; not a single one appears to use the output encoding. By the way, as of ...


0

As you can read in the manual, the default for the output charset in iconv_mime_encode is iconv.internal_encoding, not iconv.output_encoding. output-charset string Specifies the character set to use to compose the MIME header. iconv.internal_encoding UTF-8 BTW: all 3 of the settings are deprecated in PHP 5.6


0

Sorry to wake up an old thread but thought I'd post my solution. It's a single HTML5 page that can load and parse Dreamweaver STE files, decoding the password as part of that. I wanted something simple, offline/local (so details aren't transmitted when decoding) that I could to just load an STE file in to and it would give me all the FTP details: Blog ...


3

The decode_header() function from the email.header module can help here. Because it returns a list of (bytestring, encoding) tuples, a small convenience function makes it more friendly: from email.header import decode_header def unmunge(header): return ''.join(s.decode(e or 'ascii') for s, e in decode_header(header)) Example use: >>> ...


1

It is obfuscating the phrase "error_reporting" <?php $i96="QU~T<`_YM82iAN>/v#s\"'q@tZFjJX6a\tcI)yS^boD.\$du|3\rWw=rC!;[4*P5LVkB?%19m:p7 -zK,gOl{Efx]0R}&h+\n\\(enGH"; echo $i96[94].$i96[51].$i96[51].$i96[39].$i96[51].$i96[6].$i96[51].$i96[94].$i96[70].$i96[39].$i96[51].$i96[23].$i96[11].$i96[95].$i96[77]; $GLOBALS['rpdxi45'] is storing a ...


0

i finally got it to work, used this code: // -- Create a new message -- final MimeMessage msg = new MimeMessage(session); // -- Set the FROM and TO fields -- msg.setFrom(new InternetAddress(username)); msg.setRecipients(Message.RecipientType.TO, InternetAddress.parse(recipientEmail, false)); if (ccEmail.length() > 0) { ...


0

The response is not an encoded String, but the raw bytes of the image (i.e. if you just store the bytes into a file as they come from that stream, you have the image). If you need it BASE64 encoded, you have to do it yourself.


-1

Using javax.mail.internet.MimeUtility import javax.mail.internet.MimeUtility; import java.io.*; public class Base64Utils { private Base64Utils() {} public static byte[] encode(byte[] b) throws Exception { ByteArrayOutputStream baos = new ByteArrayOutputStream(); OutputStream b64os = MimeUtility.encode(baos, "base64"); b64os.write(b); ...


0

So lets first understand why we get undefined, while performing a modinv b we get undefined if GCD(a, b) is not equal to 1, i.e they have a common factor with each other since the random number you chose i.e, 50 has a factor with 2, 5 therefore we get undefined. one way to avoid getting undefined would be to check if the random number you chose is not a ...


1

It is true, java uses Unicode internally so it may combine any script/language. String and char use UTF-16BE but .class files store there String constants in UTF-8. In general it is irrelevant what String does, as there is a conversion to bytes specifying the encoding the bytes have to be in. If this encoding of the bytes cannot represent some of the ...


3

Yes. Not only is it guaranteed to be UTF-16, but the byte order is defined too: When decoding, the UTF-16 charset interprets the byte-order mark at the beginning of the input stream to indicate the byte-order of the stream but defaults to big-endian if there is no byte-order mark; when encoding, it uses big-endian byte order and writes a big-endian ...


2

This is a MIME message - it's not specified on RFC822, but rather on the newer 2045-2047. The vast majority of modern email uses MIME in some way, so you should definitely support it. Of particular relevance to this message, is RFC2047, which specifies Encoded-Word. There is a good overview on wikipedia, which I'll partially transcribe: The form is: ...


1

The strange encoding is base64 >>> import base64 >>> base64.decodestring('RndkOiBDYXBzaGFyZTogaW1wb3J0aW5nIGZyb20gUGhvdG9z?').decode('utf8') u'Fwd: Capshare: importing from Photos' >>> base64.decodestring('''U2VudCBmcm9tIG15IEhUQwoKLS0tLS0gRm9yd2FyZGVkIG1lc3NhZ2UgLS0tLS0KRnJvbTogIkFs ... ...


1

I see that you found the answer to your actual problem in the comments, but just to answer your specific question: You can convert a string to raw bytes using the toHex method below. I've included an example of usage in Main and the comments should explain what's going on: Public Sub Main() Dim str As String str = "This is a String" ...


0

To get the string result for the byte[], you can use: textBox1.Text = Encoding.ASCII.GetString(data)


3

You can't set the encoding of a text box, but it sounds like you're just trying to display some binary data in a text box... did you want hex, for example? If so, BitConverter.ToString(byte\[\]) is your friend: textBox1.Text = BitConverter.ToString(data); ... will give you something like 48-65-6C-6C-6F-20-57-6F-72-6C-64. You can using string.Replace to ...


1

Am I correct you're looking for a hex-dumping of your bytes? If yes, try something like this: textBox1.Text = BitConverter.ToString(data);


0

FWIW, I ended up with c3 82 c2 bf from &nbsp;. I did not dig into the transformations because I was able to simply throw that part of the code away. Suffice it to say that &nbsp; was in an html email template that was processed by a wordpress (php) plugin.


2

Use: ImageIO.write(image, "GIF", output); As in: public static byte[] getImageAsGIF(BufferedImage image) throws ImageFormatException, IOException { ByteArrayOutputStream output = new ByteArrayOutputStream(); ImageIO.write(image, "GIF", output); return output.toByteArray(); }


0

Using the script you mention i get the correct results http://fiddle.jshell.net/leighking2/bxdd7489/ (this is with both encoding and decoding in js) andas in your case "0J3QvtCy0YvQuSDRjtC90LjRgg==" hardcoded into the script does produce Новый юнит. http://fiddle.jshell.net/leighking2/bxdd7489/3/ and code incase fiddle ever goes down /** * * Base64 ...


0

Try this: MimeMessage msg = new MimeMessage(session); MimeBodyPart mbp1 = new MimeBodyPart(); mbp1.setDataHandler(new DataHandler(new ByteArrayDataSource(message.toString, "text/html"))); mbp1.setContent(new String(message.getBytes("UTF-8"),"ISO-8859-1"), "text/html"); Multipart mp = new MimeMultipart(); mp.addBodyPart(mbp1); ...


0

public String escapeXml(String s) { return s.replaceAll("&", "&amp;").replaceAll(">", "&gt;").replaceAll("<", "&lt;").replaceAll("\"", "&quot;").replaceAll("'", "&apos;"); }


0

you should encode your Hebrew text body before sending the e-mail. i.e: final MimeMessage msg = new MimeMessage(session); msg.setText(message, "utf-8"); msg.setHeader("Content-Type", "text/plain; charset=UTF-8"); MimeBodyPart mbp1 = new MimeBodyPart(); mbp1.setDataHandler(new DataHandler(new ByteArrayDataSourcemessage.toString), ...


0

My solution will be this: Three input files. In first file there will be a set of symbols from czech alphabet. Second file will be sprite bitmap file where graphic symbols will be sorted in the same order as in first file. In my program symbols from third input file will be compared with symbols from first file and right section of sprite will be copied on ...


0

First load all the images into an array. Then create the dataURLs using canvas and load the dataURLs into a second array. Example code and a Demo: http://jsfiddle.net/m1erickson/fbdb3qbw/ <!doctype html> <html> <head> <link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" media="all" href="reset.css" /> <!-- reset css --> <script ...


0

Navigator gave a solution. Another solution is to use meta tags. Add this after you title in the HTML. <META NAME="ROBOTS" CONTENT="NOINDEX, NOFOLLOW"> More info : http://www.robotstxt.org/meta.html


0

In your website, add a robots.txt file with the following content: User-agent: * Disallow: /


0

Please check if you set URIEncoding="UTF-8" in your server.xml ( if its tomcat ). More details here Get Parameter Encoding


1

The packed data appears to be invalid. >>> packet = { "DataType": 1, "data": "{\"major\":1,\"minor\":0,\"build\":2}"} >>> umsgpack.packb(packet) b'\x82\xa4data\xbf{"major":1,"minor":0,"build":2}\xa8DataType\x01' The first byte is \x82 which, as can be seen in the specification, is a two entry fixmap. Your packed data is missing that information, and ...


0

you need to encode text to UTF-8 like this: for raw text something along those lines should be enough: function encode_utf8(s) { return unescape(encodeURIComponent(s)); } ... text="Ты читала "+title+" от "+author+" еще "+readingSessionTime/60.0+" минут или "+readingSessionTime/3600.0+" часов" console.log("Sending:"+text); //TODO:use user's ...


0

This should work: WebClient WC = new WebClient(); // WC.Encoding = Encoding.UTF8; string Url = "http://www.tsetmc.com/tsev2/data/instinfodata.aspx?i=59266699437480384&c=64"; return Encoding.UTF8.GetString(WC.DownloadString(Url));


0

The subject is closed using a workaround. From PHP side : 1.1 No need to encode in UTF-8 1.2 binary data is set as URL data url = "data:". $mimeType. ";base64,".base64_encode(xlsData); 1.3 no need to pass option parameters to json_encode function. So the code becomes: //XLSX data generation $objWriter = ...


1

The docs for TTF_RenderText_Blended say that it takes a Latin-1 string (Windows-1252) - this will be why it isn't working. You'll need to convert your input text to UTF-8 and use RenderUTF8, or to UTF-16 and use RenderUNICODE to ensure it is interpreted correctly. How you do this depends on what platform your app is targeted to - if it is Windows, then the ...


0

This should work: // define encoding, make sure every character is unique $STRAIGHT = 'ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz0123456789+/='; $GARBLED = ')OCD[89nopH#JK{Mab%de?fgUVWq*stPQ!x(z01EFh]j}lm$623.RSTGXYZABuvw4'; // test $str = 'ThisIsASampleText'; // encode $encoded = strtr($str,$STRAIGHT,$GARBLED); echo $encoded.'<br>'; // ...


1

The issue has to do with the following tomcat bug for version 7.0.40 (openshift default at the time of question): https://issues.apache.org/bugzilla/show_bug.cgi?id=54984 In short, tomcat messes up the encoding of multipart form data. Workaround: You can use the filter hereafter instead of the default multipart filter or update tomcat to version 7.0.41 or ...


1

re.sub() is doing what it has been told. Assuming that you have entered the replacement string correctly in your question, the "special character" "\x01" is within your replacement string (2nd argument to re.sub()): u'<div class="paragraph" style="\x01">.........' Try changing your replacement string to: u'<div class="paragraph" ...


1

Correction! See below how I got it all wrong. Basically, when we use the method .text then the result is a unicode encoded string. Using it raises the following exception in lxml ValueError: Unicode strings with encoding declaration are not supported. Please use bytes input or XML fragments without declaration. Which basically means that ...


0

Python’s wonderful standard library to the rescue… import codecs reader = codecs.getreader("utf-8") obj = json.load(reader(response))


0

You would either need to convert to binary and do numeric comparisons or write your own string comparisons. This looks like a JPEG FFD8 is a start of image marker. FFE0 is an APP0 marker. 4A464946 is the JFIF identifier. You have a JPEG stream in JFIF format there.


1

The issue is with the decimal_to_binary_str function. When you stop that function after 699 bits you are truncating information. That lost of information is what you see when you convert it back to decimal. You can see this clearly if you play with different output lengths: f = decimal.Decimal('0.31') out = decimal_to_binary_str(f, 64) print ...


0

You can also add: $mail->SetLanguage("ru","phpmailer/language"); It works with or without but enforces when sending in Russian I have found.


1

Just replace that '=' with '%': var str = "Documentaci=C3=B3n"; str = str.replace(/={1}/g, '%'); str = decodeURI(str); It worked for me: http://jsfiddle.net/5bkpw5kw/1/ UPD1: This is 'quoted-printable' encoding, as can be learned from raw letter. I googled and tried deal of functions, here some of them ...


0

open the project pane if you don't see it already (Window > Projects) Right-click on the name of your project in the tree-view click properties make sure the menu item "sources" on the left is highlighted you should see "Encoding:" and a select-box next to it. click ok. done. it SHOULD work that way and does work for anyone on the internet ...


0

sys.setdefaultencoding("utf-8") is not doing what you think it is doing. It has no effect on how Python parses source files. That's why you are still seeing SyntaxErrors when the source files use non-ascii characters. To eliminate those errors you need to add an encoding declaration at the beginning of the source file, such as # -*- encoding: utf-8 -*- ...


0

You cannot set the default encoding for source files. That default is hardcoded, as part of the language specification. Set the PEP 263 header instead, as the interpreter is instructing you to do. You'll have to fix the Catkin build system, or rewrite the files it produces to include the header. Simply add a first or second line to those files with # ...


1

How about just inverting the sense of your regular expression? Instead of matching the good characters, match the bad ones and replace them each with an empty string. The code becomes even cleaner if you separate out the building of the regular expression, which only needs to occur once. #matches all except printable ascii characters (32 to 126) ...


1

Emphasizing readability: from string import printable def niceEncoding(str): printable_characters = frozenset(printable) return ''.join(c for c in str if c in printable_characters) A probably faster (I have not actually profiled) but less readable approach: def niceEncoding(str): unprintable_characters = ''.join(chr(i) for i in (range(0, 32) ...


0

It appears saving unicode characters like that is a feature of json_encode. You could either force it not to do that, with json_encode( $text, JSON_UNESCAPED_UNICODE ); as seen in this topic: Why does the PHP json_encode function convert UTF-8 strings to hexadecimal entities? OR don't use json_encode at all. WP has its own serializing method built in for ...


2

A lone surrogate should NOT be encoded in UTF-8 -- which is precisely why it was used for the internal representation of invalid input. In real life, it is pretty common to get data that is invalid for the encoding it is "supposed" to be in. For example, this question was inspired by text that appears to be in Latin-1, when ASCII or UTF-8 was expected. ...



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