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5

Background The code uses the ASCII value of the letters. The letters A-Z are ASCII values 65-90. The idea is to add the two letters together, but wrap around if the values goes above 90 (known as modular arithmetic). So 91 should actually be 65 (i.e. Z + 1 = A). Java provides a % operator for doing modular arithmetic (x % n). However, this is designed to ...


4

I'm guessing the cost simply makes it so it runs through the function 12 times to encrypt the word "rasmuslerdorf" No, the cost parameter effects an exponential amount of work to be done. But I don't understand whether it requires other measures such as a random salt to make it secure. The password_hash() function automatically generates a random ...


3

To set and fetch "s" properly you need to urlencode() it when you set it on the URL and urldecode() it when you fetch it. It looks to me like "s" possibly has not been URL encoded when set on the URL.


3

You're talking about digital rights management, although you may not know it. Encrypting something so it's really hard to read is relatively easy. Doing so at the same time as allowing someone to read it, but only when you say so is really difficult. (as in, basically impossible without control over the target infrastructure, at which point it's largely ...


3

Deterministic encryption leaks if two messages are the same. This is particularly severe with asymmetric encryption, since an attacker can encrypt an unlimited number of chosen messages. To avoid this weakness, standard RSA padding is randomized. The code you posted is not related to that randomization, it merely converts binary data to a printable hex ...


2

I think you are forgetting to translate from ring setting to rotor position before passing the character to the next ring, step 4 below. It seems to me that you only take into account the acctual rotor encoding and pass that on to the next ring. The proper way is 1) letter comes in 2) translate letter using rotor setting offset 3) translate offest letter ...


2

use base64 encoding for the output of the encryption, don't use new String() as some byte-values will not be represented correctly as string. so when reversed to bytes again it will not be the correct ciphered value here is what i mean: String msg1="Message from bob 1"; // message MSGBOB = cipher.doFinal(msg1.getBytes("ISO-8859-1")); // encryption ...


2

The Bcrypt algorithm is the default algorithm. So, PASSWORD_DEFAULT and PASSWORD_BCRYPT are the same. The default algorithm can be configured in your php.ini file, but if you did not know that then it is most likely still the default. The cost number is not how many times it is hashed. How many times it is hashed is calculated by using the formula, 2^cost. ...


2

There isn't any way in the UI to encrypt your password. You have two options: Record entering text into the password field. This will record the text entered using the setPasswordText() method, which you can copy and paste into your test. Write a short test that calls Agent.encrypt(). This will return the encrypted version of the text passed in. Copy the ...


2

There is no guarentee cipher text will not contain escape sequence like \n, which make getline() get wrong string(truncated). So it is recommended to transform the cipher text to hex or something else to avoid escape sequence.


2

ekl is a size_t, and you are casting it to an (int*). The docs for EVP_SealInit say: The actual size of each encrypted secret key is written to the array ekl. You're just passing one key, so passing the address of a single integer is sufficient, but you should be passing the address of that integer, e.g.: EVP_SealInit(rsaCtx, EVP_aes_256_cbc(), ...


2

Well, your code works for me on Linux (compiled with GCC 4.8.2), even using your sample input and key. This suggests that the issue is specific to Windows — most likely, that it's caused by stdin and stdout being in text mode by default. (On Linux and other Unix-ish systems, there's usually no difference between text mode and binary mode, so such ...


2

ECB and CBC modes are inherently different (wikipedia). ECB simply applies the block cipher on every plaintext block with the key separately, but CBC XORs the current plaintext block with the last ciphertext block. Exactly the same mode and padding is needed to decrypt in one go. If you have access to AES/CBC/NoPadding, but not AES/ECB/PKCS5Padding or ...


2

The PKCS#1 v1.5 Padding that is used by JSBN and your Crypto++ code is a random padding, so if you encrypt data with the same key it will look differently. You have to check whether your implementation works by encrypting on one end and decrypting on the other in both directions.


2

Rather than converting to byte[] as an intermediate step when passing to different stream objects you can chain multiple streams together, passing the output from one to the input of another. This approach makes sense here, as you are chaining together Binary Serialization => Encryption => Writing to File. With this in mind, you can change ...


2

Your decryption code looks wrong: cipher.doFinal(data.getBytes()) Your data variable is a string, but strings can't hold raw encrypted data without corrupting it. Unless your ciphertext is actually hex-encoded or base64-encoded etc. In which case, getBytes() is not the right way to decode that into a byte array. So either fix the way you are sending your ...


2

It's an encoding algorithm (hence "Base64 encoding") to allow people to move data in an ASCII friendly environment (i.e. no control characters or anything non-printable). It should give you good portability with XML and JSON etc. The encoding is entirely well known, the algorithm is simple and as it has not "mutability" of the algorithm or concept of keys ...


2

Your problem is that the key itself is made of upper and lower case chars. SO it works well for BaR as this word has the same case as the key BaZ, but for Foo the last o is lower case and the key is upper so the computation LtrNum = keyword[j % keyLen] - 'a' is wrong. I can suggest you to convert every char of the key to upper (for example) so that your ...


2

Many encryption tools (and libraries) allow you to provide a 'password', which it uses to derive an appropriately sized key. In order to prevent ambiguity, the term cryptographic key is often used to refer to the N-bit key used with an encryption algorithm. If you look at the code on the page you linked, it's calculating a SHA-1 hash of the key you gave it, ...


1

The problem is in this line in the encrypt1 function: int keyIndex = alphabet.get(passwordPos++ % password.length()); Here you're trying to look up a key in the password, but you're actually getting it from the alphabet. What you want is to find the relevant character from the password (looping around when you reach the end), and then find out what the ...


1

Bit late now, but if it helps: I was getting that same error after following that same tutorial and although I can't see the issue in your code I found that I would get this error whenever there was something in the $form being passed into paypal_encrypt() that PayPal didn't like. tl;dr: invalid data in $form can trigger this "helpful" error Also, be aware ...


1

The key you have displayed is 48 bits in size, not 96 bits in size - if it is considered to be specified hexadecimals. A DES key without parity would be 56 bits in size. This means that you have to create the parity bits that are missing. The parity of DES is described as such: One bit in each 8-bit byte of the KEY may be utilized for error detection in ...


1

Your error can be observed by looking at this line: def enc(c,k): return chr(((ord(k) + ord(c)) % 26) + ord('A')) This function exploits character codes to encrypt the result. Since it uses modulo 26, and adds ord('A') it is specialized for upper case letters. One way to rewrite the encryption/decryption if you don't mind unreadable encrypted strings is: ...


1

As an example, when you use a https-prefixed url (https==http over ssl), NSURLSession will handle this for you. A simple GET will look like the code below.All the handshake, public key stuff will be handled for you. If you use post and send data to the server, the encryption will also be handled for you if a https url is used. // use default session ...


1

The code is buggy and insecure and isn't going to work - the thread will never get to the point of trying to populate the session. But your question implies that you think it is getting there and there's something wrong with the session. There isn't. The most elementary part of fault finding is isolating the problem - there are lots of ways of doing this, ...


1

You have to do some ord and chr tricks to do what you want. Basically, these two functions return the integer representation of your letters, and outputs the corresponding letter of the integer representation, respectively. def pre_process(s): s= s.replace("'","") s= s.replace('.','') s= s.lower() s= s.replace(" ","") mystring = "" ...


1

Ok so I have managed to find out what I'm looking for thanks to @cerebriform's comment Here is how I did it $refenc = base64_encode($refence); $refence is the result of the AES encryption so before sending it as a mail It was encoded again but this time using base64_encode(). So how it looks like, I'll show you $final = base64_encode($rdfence);. Then ...


1

You could use the Seive of Eratosthenes, to check if a number is prime. What you can do is, generate a list of all prime numbers (which the seive helps build easily) less than 2^7 - so that condition #1 is maintained. Then pick 2 numbers, p and q, at random from the list. Here's how to build a list of primes using the seive: List<Integer> ...


1

P and Q must be greater than 1 and at most 7 bits, that is to say, smaller than 2^7 = 128. Simply, generate a number between 2 and 127 inclusive. For this purpose, you should use Random.nextInt, since it already gives you a random integer in a specified interval. Decide an upper bound for the random integers and you are set: final Random rand = new ...


1

You need to generate a one way HASH of the password. That is what you store and send to the server. You would asked the server for the SALT for that user.



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