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6

Preface: Neither MD5 nor SHA-x are suitable for password hashes; ignoring the fact MD5 is cryptographically broken and should be phased out in general, both hash families are too fast and are not suited for this problem - This is because the hashes are too fast, and humans often choose weak/poor password which severely compromises the domain, which makes ...


5

encrypt(serializeJson(stFields),theKey) First, that is NOT AES encryption. You omitted the algorithm parameter, so encrypt() defaults to the legacy CFMX_COMPAT algorithm (weakest). CFMX_COMPAT it is not a "real" encryption algorithm at all, so do not use it - for anything! Second, with AES you are limited to 128 bit keys out of the box. In order to use ...


4

HmacSHA1 is a hash so it means it works only one way, you cannot get the original value from it. You would need to use algorithm that is reversible.


4

Your encryption algorithm is basically equivalent to the Caesar cipher, and is thus vulnerable to a wide variety of cryptanalysis attacks, such as frequency analysis. It's fine if you're only using it for a toy program, but you may want to use an established cryptographic algorithm (in a library such as NaCl or LibreSSL) instead if you plan to use it for ...


3

The commenters suggested this: std::ostringstream oss; write_xml(oss, pt); // now you can encrypt std::string plain_text = oss.str(); Now you can encrypt the plaintext and write the ciphertext to a file


2

str_out_length=strlen(str_in)+1; //+1 for null terminator str_out=(char*)malloc(sizeof(char)*str_out_length); It seems that the terminator is placed one byte behind the allocated buffer. Try str_out[str_out_length - 1]='\0'; And similarly, perhaps for(i=0;i<str_out_length;i++) should be for(i=0;i<str_out_length-1;i++) Or, maybe better, ...


2

Yes, it is computationally possible (most algorithms are, given enough time and memory). However, I think you should read more into DH, because the above scheme isn't it. And if you have read into it, continue with ECDH because it will perform much better on Java Script. Also note that implementing cryptography in Java Script has many pitfalls, especially ...


2

AES (or Rijndael) are pretty much standards, on Linux blowfish comes to my mind but in C# you want to stick with what you have for free. I'd advise to set the values instead of leaving them at their defaults. This guarantees that silent malfunctioning is less probable. Of course, you'll have to know exactly what you are doing. But security is all about ...


2

Unfortunately the Security framework on iOS requires that private keys be in the PKCS12 format, with a passphrase. Public keys can be in X509 armored DER or PKCS12, but private keys are required to be PKCS12. The private key you are trying to use is a PEM-formatted RSA key. If you have access to the key it can be converted using the openssl command line ...


2

While, as you mention, it's impossible to protect your python files from someone with logical access to the system (i.e.: someone who logs in as root), it's easy and commonplace to protect against physical theft of the storage devices where they reside. You can do it on at least three diferent levels: Have a encrypted filesystem on the SD card, such as ...


2

Instead of rolling your own, just use the standard CryptoStream class. To enable reading from it, use CryptoStreamMode.Read in the constructor call.


2

You can't with certainty. AES is an encryption algorithm. Encryption is reversible if you have the key. AES is an example of a symmetric key encryption: that you need the same key for encryption and decryption of the message. Key is by definition secret, so in theory you should never find it out. There is a set of "standard" symmetric encryption ...


1

The answer seems to be yes, when I read the file from Java(see also my other question), I can get the algorithm viz.: 1.2.840.113549.1.12.1.3 from algParams.getAlgorithm() Googling this yields: pbeWithSHAAnd3-KeyTripleDES-CBC See also: http://www.oid-info.com/get/1.2.840.113549.1.12.1.3 This is a 3key triple DES, which entails 168 bits. public static ...


1

This is roughly what's usually referred to as "kid sister" cryptography--it might be barely enough to keep your kid sister out of your files, if she's fairly young and not particularly brilliant. Otherwise, it's pretty trivial to break; First, consider your key generation: you're using time, which typically has a resolution of one second. If I can guess ...


1

It is obfuscating the phrase "error_reporting" <?php $i96="QU~T<`_YM82iAN>/v#s\"'q@tZFjJX6a\tcI)yS^boD.\$du|3\rWw=rC!;[4*P5LVkB?%19m:p7 -zK,gOl{Efx]0R}&h+\n\\(enGH"; echo $i96[94].$i96[51].$i96[51].$i96[39].$i96[51].$i96[6].$i96[51].$i96[94].$i96[70].$i96[39].$i96[51].$i96[23].$i96[11].$i96[95].$i96[77]; $GLOBALS['rpdxi45'] is storing a ...


1

Let A = A0A1A2...AN and B = B0B1B2...BN 2 arrays of N bytes. Cool thing about the XOR (noted ^) is that you have the following equality: A ^ B = (A0 ^ B0) (A1 ^ B1) (A2 ^ B2) ... (AN ^ BN) So provided C1 and C2 are 2 arrays of 52 bytes you just have to: char xor[52]; for(size_t i=0; i<52; i++) { xor[i] = c1[i] ^ c2[i]; }


1

This is not possible as the default keystore (jks) is a proprietary format used by Java. To exchange the key you would need something portable like PKCS#11 (which is a supported KeyStore format at least in Java 8).


1

Assuming that your client class sends the encrypted bytes arrays, in your server class, decrypt the byte array and then reconstruct your image from the decrypted byte array. ByteArrayInputStream dis = new ByteArrayInputStream(your_EncryptedBytes_array); //Call Your decrypt method here. ByteArrayInputStream bis = new ...


1

The point of the token is that you can then use the token to obtain information from Google about the user. During the initial authentication, you will tell the user, and google, that you want to access certain information about the user: https://developers.google.com/+/api/oauth Assuming that the user allows you to access their information, such as their ...


1

The AES-128 encryption method is encrypting the entire TS container including headers. It may seem strange if you're familiar with other systems like DVB simulcrypt, but it's very simple (or simplistic). The SAMPLE-AES encryption method, on the other hand, only encrypts the audio and part of the video data. Beyond that, many implementations use a ...


1

Not quite sure why that's failing - perhaps some error with the length of the key provided? The inner exception should be able to tell you more if there's one present. Regardless, you should be aware that 3DES is being phased out by NIST and that ASP.NET does not use 3DES in a FIPS-compliant fashion. (Reference: ...


1

gpg reads from stdin while encrypting, thus run echo "my string to encrypt" | gpg --encrypt gpg --import imports key material to GnuPG's keystore, where it remains; thus you only have to call it once (and it is a rather slow operation, as it might trigger updating your trust database).


1

This can be achieved using the javax.management.DescriptorKey. For example, using a code sample that I adapted for this, using a standard mbean: "Obfuscated" annotation: import java.lang.annotation.*; import javax.management.DescriptorKey; @Documented @Target(ElementType.METHOD) @Retention(RetentionPolicy.RUNTIME) public @interface Obfuscated { ...


1

The boolean you are referring to is not meant to switch the padding on or off. It uses OAEP padding or PKCS#1 v1.5 padding (it should never have been a boolean in the first place, it should have been an enum value). Both padding mechanisms deploy (partially) randomized padding. As long as your random source is indeed random, the output won't be ...


1

Well, brew install gettext fixed it.


1

Is there any reason that you use different IVs? You use the IV new byte[]{0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15}; in Java whereas you use the IV new byte[] {0x00, 0x01, 0x02, 0x03, 0x04, 0x05, 0x06, 0x07, 0x08, 0x09, 0x10, 0x11, 0x12, 0x13, 0x14, 0x15} in C#. In Java you use decimal numbers and in C# hex numbers which translate to new ...


1

The implementation of the code in php is not quite right. ENCODE if (strpos($s1, $SecurityString[$i]) > 0) The php function strpos may well 0 return. To test whether a character found in another string you should use === true or === false. if (strpos($s1, $SecurityString[$i]) === true) Exit; if (strpos($Codes64, $SecurityString[$i]) === ...



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