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4

What you need to do is take your data and put it into a byte array. Then once it is in a byte array, you can encrypt it using an encryption algorithm. Then you write it to the file. When you want to get the original data back, you have to read the byte array from the file, then decrypt the byte array and then you will have your original data. You cannot ...


4

You're basically going in the right direction, but I'll point out some things to think about: The default number of iterations of the PBKDF2 method may not be sufficient, and you may not want to leave things to the default. I would recommend specifying an iteration count of at least 10K. On the other hand, the key size and salt size are counted by this ...


2

You have a dilemma: hash your tokens in your database so they are unrecoverable (and need to be reset if forgotten), or store them in plain text and allow database thieves to get access to real keys if the application is compromised. Personally, I'd say that if someone hacks your app to get access to your whole database, it's rather game over anyway. At ...


2

RSA works on numbers. This is different than e.g. AES that works on bits and bytes. So, during the calculation, 041 is identical to 41. However, you explicitly split your plaintext up into 3 digit values. So the only thing you have to do is to add 0 characters to the left until you have 3 digits. The only thing left is the final number. You could pad with ...


2

Found that this is an issue with the Decrypter. Problem was decrypted Assertion wasn't properly rooted. By calling setRootInNewDocument(true) of the Decrypter before the decryption, you can have properly rooted Assertion. So Signature validation will succeed.


2

Your transposition table tells you where the characters ended up. So when you look at the scrambled code and your encryption array, you can decrypt as follows (using your example). transposition "cypher" = { 2, 4, 0, 1, 3 }' original string = J a c k s encrypted string = c k J s a Now to decrypt, you just ...


2

You should base 64 encode the result of the encryption method (called the ciphertext), and decode it again before decryption. You are currently base 64 encoding the plain text in the encryption function instead of the ciphertext. Encoding the plain text is not necessary. It would be however a good idea to use a well defined character-encoding for the plain ...


2

The Protect and Unprotect methods are only making calls to the DPAPI, which only works across computers if you have roaming profiles enabled, and only then under certain circumstances. Instead, use a algorithm with a session key which you manage yourself (AES, others...), or better yet: use TLS as your WebSocket (wss://) or Socket transport (SslStream). ...


2

You are using System.Security.Cryptography.ProtectedData class that uses Data Protection API (DPAPI) under the hood. DPAPI encryption keys are always unique on each computer therefore when you encrypt data on computer A you are using key A and when you try to decrypt the data on the computer B you are using the key B. DPAPI provides interface to symmetric ...


2

for(i = 0; i < 62: i++){ input[i] = fgetc(file1); fgetc(file1); encrypted[i] = fgetc(file1); fgetc(file1); } EDIT: try this char *buff; char *decoded; long file_Size; fseek(file1, 0, SEEK_END); file_Size = ftell(file1); fseek(file1, 0, SEEK_SET); buff = malloc(file_Size * sizeof(char)); decoded = malloc((file_Size - 62 * 4) * ...


2

Your encryption method is not invertible, and so you cannot reliably decrypt a general binary message with it. The problem occurs because it is possible for two different plaintext values to encrypt to the same ciphertext value, and when this happens there's no way for you to determine when decrypting which was the correct input value. Example: if inByte = ...


2

You are not doing any error handling at all. All of the API functions you are calling have return values and error codes, none of which you are checking. You are also not managing bytesRead correctly. CryptEncrypt() modifies the variable you pass to it, which then affects your call to CreateDecrypt(), which also modifies it, and that then affects ...


2

Rahul, converting a string from ASCII to base64 string isn't an encryption, in contrary to the link that you have given shows. It might not be readable at the fist glance, but wouldn't take long to figure out. Using configsection.protectSection() with an RSA key is a proper encryption that is available for sections of the Web.config file. Check this link: ...


1

You cannot play the encrypted video (that's the point of the encryption after all), but you can instead only decrypt and hold in memory the part of the movie that the playback library needs to access in this moment. There are block cipher modes like CTR that allow you to decrypt the stream at arbitrary positions so you can even seek in the video playback. ...


1

You don't actually have to send multiple mails. Instead cryptography standards such as PGP do it like this: Generate a random message key, encrypt your message with that message key, encrypt the message key with each recipient's key and put everything in your email. The overhead of the encrypted message keys for the other recipients will be minimal and ...


1

This isn't a HTTPS request at all, it is a CONNECT tunnel through which HTTPS traffic subsequently flows. Client applications first send a CONNECT request to the proxy (like Fiddler) to tell them where to establish a TCP/IP connection to, then after the connection establishes, a HTTPS handshake is performed and the requests are sent. When showing you the ...


1

If you use AES, you must have the same key and IV to decrypt data. You shouldn't look for any option to make your key or IV predictable. That is, if you can easily re-generate it, guess what?.. You probably want to post what you trying to achieve. Seems like AES may not be the right choice. You may need to look at public-private key cryptography, where one ...


1

While this library doesn't address my original needs, it's security is more than enough for my requirements. It easily adds encrypting/decrypting across multiple languages as well. https://github.com/RNCryptor/RNCryptor


1

Two ways that you can do this: Read each of the 62 lines one-by-one. You can use fgets() for this. For each line, split by the whitespace token using strtok: http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/cstring/strtok/ and assign each character to the appropriate array. Read in the characters one by one and assign each character to its appropriate array based on ...


1

FileSource(file.c_str(), false, new PK_EncryptorFilter(*rng, *encryptor, new FileSink((file+".xx").c_str(), true) ), true); This does not look right. new FileSink((file+".xx").c_str() returns a char*, and you need a pointer to a Sink. Plus, there's an extra false in there I'm not used to seeing. Something like: FileSource fs1(filename, ...


1

After much digging around I finally found this link. Here is what I ended up doing in my Metro app: private static bool GetPBKDFDerivedKey(string password, byte[] salt, // length = 32 bytes (256 bits) out byte[] encryptionKeyOut) // length = 32 bytes (256 bits) { IBuffer saltBuffer = ...


1

You aren't using SHA512 for the encryption/decryption, that value is used if you are then going to create a certificate or certificate request tied to this keypair. Here is a breakdown on the parameters you used: "digest_alg" => "sha512" For the digest in a certificate. "private_key_bits" => 4096, "private_key_type" => OPENSSL_KEYTYPE_RSA, ...


1

You're trying to decrypt ciphertext with a random number generator created using a specific seed. However, you don't specify the algorithm, and the algorithm may change internally as well. Android is even known to generate a fully random value instead for some versions. You need to use a SecretKeyFactory not a KeyGenerator. And you will of course need the ...


1

NO. You haven't described the way the public key of the server can be trusted by the user. So unless you've distributed the public key securely, the user may be talking to anybody. TLS can help with this by using the PKI used by browsers. Furthermore anybody can randomly try user names and receive the data. Then it is possible to brute force the password. ...


1

The problem is likely on this line: strDecrypted += (char)((charArray[i] - 'A' - rotation) + 'A'); At this point, rotation is positive and this is essentially the same as: strDecrypted += (char)((charArray[i] - rotation)); You will need to handle cases where rotation is large enough that the resulting character becomes less than 'A'.


1

Reusing the same symmetric key and same IV is extremely incorrect approach and must not be used ever. Reusing the same key and IV will enable attacks where the attacker will be able to recover your secret key just be eavesdropping on the encrypted traffic for long enough. And when the attacker has your key he will be able to decrypt all and every past and ...


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The output of AES-CBC (without ciphertext stealing) is always a multiple of 16 bytes (32 hex characters). As you do not provide hexadecimal characters at all ("test") and since the string is not a multiple of 32 hexadecimal characters you will always see an error. So this: 000102030405060708090A0B0C0D0E0F101112131415161718191A1B1C1D1E1F would for ...


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The ICryptoTransform provides a separate function: TransformFinalBlock that should be used when encrypting/decrypting the buffer that contains the last block of data, and ensures that necessary padding is added. Since you are only working with a single block, you should be using this method rather than TransformBlock. Note that returns the ...


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SHA-256 returns 32 bytes by default (256 / 8 = 32), not 16. The normal way to use a part of a hash is to use the first (leftmost) 16 bytes of the resulting hash. You can do this by applying the Java copyOf method on the result of SHA-256. Please use a real hexadecimal encoder to display the result (not to return a value, you don't need any String instances ...


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hashlib.sha256 operates on the exact input string. Since the hex string and binary string are different, sha256 of them is different. When you call sha256 you need to ensure you pass the same form consistently (both hex and binary works, but you have to stick to one form consistently).



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