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4

You have to pair each bit of message with a same size bit of OTP. There's a limited amount of OTP. If you pair up all of the OTP bits with bits for the next OTP... a b c d e ... q w e r t ... There's no room for a message. And if you keep spending your OTP transferring another OTP, there never will be room for a message. You can't compress the OTP, ...


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You need to use the same mode of operation. Your java code specifies the cipher string as "AES". This is not fully qualified, so your default JCE provider will select its own default for "AES" which is "AES/ECB/PKCS5Padding" (in your case), because it's the most basic one, but also insecure mode. You need to use the same mode of operation in node.js. The ...


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The answer you have posted implements the Rfc2898DeriveBytes class to get the bytes of the encrypting key. This is advised, but not mandatory. You don't have to use Rfc2898DeriveBytes and can simply modify that AES implementation not to take a salt and simply take the password's bytes as the key directly. Although I don't recommend this in practice. What I ...


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You can setup a REST backend and communicate with it over HTTPS. This gives you a simple way to allow communcation between backend and any app securely. As for framework to use, there are many out there! If you want to write it in Java, I would suggest Dropwizard. If you want to manage it on your own, I would still suggest to use the libraries that ...


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The problem is that "sk.toString()" does not provide the contents of the key. You need to call "sk.getEncoded()". Please note that it will return a byte array, not an String. Write the contents of that byte array to the file and read it back. Try with this modified code that uses "getEncoded()": import java.util.*; import java.nio.file.Files; import ...


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Your code is OK assuming that the parameter input in your public String decrypt(byte[] input) method is successfully Base64 decoded from the cipher text by the caller (because your encrption returns Base64 encoded cipher string). But, in the decrypt() method you are creating a byte array plainText by getOutputSize() method. That makes plainText an array of ...


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There are multiple problems with your code: Your input and output types of the decryption function are reversed. If you encrypt a byte[], you should get one out when you decrypt it. If your ciphertext is a Base64 String then the decryption method should take such a String and not a byte[]. String encrypt(byte[] plaintext) { ... return ...


2

You're missing the private key with 3662FD5E. I have no other key given except for these credentials. Without this key, you cannot decrypt the file. The password you have might protect the private key, but without the private key, there's definitely no way to decrypt the file (unless in future, a way is found to crack the encryption, but as of now, ...


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Don't emulate old PHP versions weak behaviour for initializing IV. Use mcrypt_create_iv(). They removed the auto zero-byte iv for a reason.


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As @Artjom B. suggested I implemented PKCS#5 padding according to the Specification 6.1.1 Encryption Operation ... 4. Concatenate M and a padding string PS to form an encoded message EM: EM = M || PS , where the padding string PS consists of 8-(||M|| mod 8) octets each with value 8-(||M|| mod 8). The ...


2

No. AES is specified with four basic operations on a 4x4 matrix: SubBytes, ShiftRows, MixColumns and AddKey. An "8 byte AES" would be a fundamentally different cipher. Especially the ShiftRows and MixColumns operations are based on the concept of a square matrix. Hence the block size of any "AES-like" block cipher would need to be a square of N (4, 9, 16, ...


2

AES is defined only for 128-bit block sizes. If there would be a way to reduce the block size, it wouldn't be AES anymore. The block cipher is not the only thing that determines what you can encrypt. The mode of operation determines how the block cipher is actually applied. If you have a limited size plaintexts, you can use AES in a streaming mode such as ...


2

No. AES is not a group. For simplicity's sake, let's just say it this way: AES encryption is not commutative. Said another way, since AES is not a group, there is no key X such that encrypting with key Y and then key Z, key X can decrypt in one step. There are no shortcuts. If you encrypt Input with CombinedKey then only CombinedKey will decrypt it. ...


1

Sure. Create a complete heapdump of the process or JVM and you will be able to see it. I don't know what operating system your application runs in or if it is standalone or run in container like Tomcat but exactly this is the reason why processes need to be separated. You have to make sure that the file or JNDI configuration your password is stored in is ...


1

The output of RSA encryption, or any secure encryption method, outputs data that is indistinguishable from random to an attacker. This is performed by the IV for symmetric ciphers and by the padding method for RSA. If this wasn't the case then an attacker would be able to see similarities for different ciphertext; encrypt "yes" twice and the same ciphertext ...


1

The issue is almost-certainly in how you are constructing your query parameters. You need to encode each parameters value using encodeURIComponent, as the data may contain characters such as + which will be converted into as space unless properly encoded. Your storage URL using encodeURIComponent: var url = ...


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You can use download manager to download files using asyntask. After that encrypt and decrypt that files. please refer below link.enter link description here


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Basically, a keystore is a repository of certificates located on the file system. See a more detailed definition here: https://www.google.com/search?client=ubuntu&channel=fs&q=what+is+a+keystore&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8 Also this SO question What is Keystore? I believe should be helpful.


1

The short answer is that update() can't distinguish the ciphertext from the tag. The final() function can. The long answer: Since Sun's specification requires the tag to be appended to the ciphertext, the tag needs to be stripped from the source buffer (ciphertext) during (or rather, prior to) decryption. However, because the ciphertext can be provided over ...


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Please note that you are NOT VNC to the linux server. Instead, you VNC to your local machine as if it is the VNC server. If you are interested in more details, please read on. This way, the VNC connection will actually consists of 3 sections: local VNC client port (dynamic allocated) to local:5901 , this is NOT encrypted. Above traffic then forwarded to ...


1

A very simple (and very unsafe) method for encryption would be to just XOR the password phrase with your text data. The decryption is another XOR with the same passphrase. You will need to repeat the passphrase until the end of the text data. Note that this can be easily cracked but it provides a rudamentary layer of encryption.


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It looks to me like your MySQL string column is defined with a varchar(nnn) data type. Is that correct? If so, I suggest you base-64 encode your encrypted material before storing it into MySQL, and base-64 decode it afterward? This is common practice in the transmission and storage of encrypted information. It makes your material string-safe. MySQL may be ...


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Your best bet would probably be to simply use SSL sockets for your network communications, rather than writing the encryption code yourself. While your question isn't exactly a duplicate of this one, you'd likely be well served by the answers here: Secret Key SSL Socket connections in Java


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I suspect that the problem is not passing the encrypted status between the 2 clients. If the "encrypt" object is a button then it is a button on only one side of the client-client connection. You will need to pass the encrypted state to the other client, so that it knows to decrypt the message. A short cut to confirming this would be to automatically show ...


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First of all you need to choose which encryption to use and where to save your key . once you've done that , you need to run the encryption / decryption method on the value that you are writing/reading from the XML file.


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I found two sources, one discusses the security problems with opening doors without a physical key and one pretty funny treasure hunt with iBeacons. In short: To securely open your car when you are near there are multiple factors checked, none of them are available on your everyday iBeacon. Estimote uses a kind of pseudorandomly changing UUID wich can be ...


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The error suggests that the encrypt method does not support encrypting a string message. Try encoding your string to bytes first using encode, e.g.: print(RSAPubKey.encrypt("Hello.".encode('utf-8'), 32)) It's also worth noting that, per the documentation, encrypt performs "textbook" RSA encryption, which is insecure due to the lack of padding. You should ...


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Let's say, that your MemoryStream contains the following input data: [0x01, 0x02, 0x03, 0x04] When you read it with streamreader, the binary representation of your string will be: [0x00, 0x01, 0x00, 0x02, 0x00, 0x03, 0x00, 0x04], because strings use two byte representation for a character. What you do afterwards is that you allocate 8 bytes for your "bytes" ...


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There are two ways to store MD5 based hashes in .htpasswd: standard md5crypt and Apache's own MD5 hashing. The two algorithms are identical, but they use different magic string constants. They're based on md5'ing 1000 times as you say, but if you look closely at the algorithm, you'll see that it appends the plaintext password in each iteration. It's not ...


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I'll assume that you're sending the ciphertext in a hex encoded form. DataInputStream#readUTF() reads a single Unicode character from the stream. Since you're sending hex characters this will mean that a single ciphertext byte can be constructed from two of such Unicode characters. The problem is that AES operates on blocks. Trying to decrypt every single ...



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