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47

A hash value is a sequence of bytes. This is binary information. It is not a sequence of characters. UTF-8 is an encoding for turning sequences of characters into sequences of bytes. Storing a hash value "as UTF-8" makes no sense, since it is already a sequence of bytes, and not a sequence of characters. Unfortunately, many people have took to the habit of ...


23

There is a fundamental, security-related reason to store as Base64 rather than Unicode: the hash may contain the byte value "0", used by many programming languages as an end-of-string marker. If you store your hash as Unicode, you, another programmer, or some library code you use may treat it as a string rather than a collection of bytes, and compare using ...


10

This is an easy answer, since there are an abundance of byte sequences which are not well-formed UTF-8 strings. The most common one is a continuation byte (0x80-0xbf) that is not preceded by a leading byte in a multibyte sequence (0xc0-0xf7); bytes 0xf8-0xff aren't valid either. So these byte sequences are not valid UTF-8 strings: 0x80 0x40 0xa0 0xff 0xfe ...


4

your problem has something to do with the cipher's mode of operation ... cbc, or cipher block chaining mode in general CBC is simple ... take whatever the output of your previous encryiption block was, and xor that onto the current input before encrypting it for the first block we obviously have a problem... there is no previous block ... therefore we ...


4

Never try to provide a feature to allow people to recover their password. If you are storing passwords correctly, then that should be impossible. Note: You should be hashing passwords before you put them into the database, not when you take them out and MD5 is an unsuitable hashing algorithm so you need to take better care of your users' passwords. ...


3

This problem is similar to the issues with the ECB mode of block ciphers. What happens here is that any repetition of data in your original file also results in repetition in the ciphertext. For example, if your bits are "00000..." over a long stretch, then the encrypted version will just be your key repeated over the same stretch. The pattern of ...


3

If you use a constant key there is no chance for a decent level of security. In fact, as your images show some of the data still 'jump' out of the resulting image.. The missing component is a way to change your encoding key during encrytion. The most obviuos way is to use a Random generator to create a new encoding byte for each XOR operation. This way the ...


3

The problem is this: $editFile = str_replace( "encryption_salt", $salt, $editFile ); $editFile = str_replace( "encryption_salt2", $salt2, $editFile ); You are replacing the encryption_salt in encryption_salt2 on the first replacement. Then the second replacement does nothing because the pattern encryption_salt2 no longer exists.


2

PKCS#7 padding is deterministic. That means that unpadding should always be able to find out the padding length itself. So you first decrypt, then take the last byte (as number) and that is the padding length. For this to work, PKCS#7 padding is always applied. So the amount of padding, and thus the value of the bytes, is 1 to the blocksize, which is 16 ...


2

You can use direct list conversion of a string, and then use use the ord()/chr() functions to mess with an individual character's ASCII value. Strings are immutable, but lists aren't. You can concatenate strings just fine in Python, and strings can be changed via list conversion and reconversion with split() and join(). Python strings also have isupper(), ...


2

Python source code: Note: working for negative shift numbers also Note: if reverse shift then we do encode - decode message Note: preserving spaces also small_chars = [chr(item) for item in range(ord('a'), ord('z')+1)] upper_chars = [item.upper() for item in small_chars] def encode_chr(chr_item, is_upper_case): ''' Cipher each chr_item. ...


2

It helps to understand if we split the code into smaller functions: def chr2int(i): return ord(i) - 65 This is for mapping upper case letters to integers starting from 0. Example: chr2int('A') == ord('A') - 65 == 0 chr2int('B') == ord('B') - 65 == 1 chr2int('Z') == ord('Z') - 65 == 25 65 is the decimal code of the uppercase letter 'A' ord('A') == ...


2

Like @ÐarkSquirrel42 already points out the en/decrytion routine for CBC seems to interpret the first 16 bytes as an initialisation vector. This worked for me: // got to be random byte[] iv = { 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0 }; IvParameterSpec ivspec = new IvParameterSpec(iv); cipher.init(Cipher.XXXXX_MODE, ...


2

Base64 is better, but consider a websafe base64 alphabet for transport. Base64 can conflict with querystring syntax. Another option you might consider is using hex. Its longer but seldom conflicts with any syntax.


2

Yes, the key generation should be secure. The OS probably has the best access to a cryptographically secure random number generator. This is not a full security review of course. You are using a random IV because .NET automatically generates one for you. Problem is that you don't communicate that IV to the decrypt function. This is why the decryption of the ...


1

You are explicitly requesting a zipped stream: conn.addRequestProperty("Accept-Encoding", "gzip,deflate"); Remove that line to remove the compression. Compression is different from encryption fortunately, it doesn't require you to supply a key.


1

The result of SecRandomCopyBytes should always be 0, unless there is some error (which I can't imagine why that might happen) and then the result would be -1. You're not going to convert that into a NSString. The thing you're trying to get are the random bytes which are being written into the mutable bytes section, and that's what you'll be using as your ...


1

Assuming the code works (I didn't test it), you may need to just refresh your eclipse project. If the secure.data file is created in there, eclipse won't automatically refresh to show it. If you want to create the files in a specific location, put an absolute path into new File(...) e.g. to create in C:\temp, use: File secureFile = new ...


1

As someone answered when you posted this on the openssl-users mailing list, the CLI uses ECB mode and the program uses CFB mode. DES-ECB isn't the same as DEC-CFB (or any other mode).


1

As @Kevin, mentions, you are overwriting phrase so some characters will get encoded multiple times. The solution is to build up the answer in a new variable: answer = "" for each in range(len(phrase)): letternum = alphabet.index(phrase[each]) if letternum > 21: letternum = letternum+5-26 else: letternum = letternum + 5 ...


1

With only the encrypted data, there's no way to tell for sure, but a good indicator is to check the data length. All of the common modern block ciphers (AES, Blowfish, DES, Serpent, Twofish) have block sizes of either 64 or 128 bits (8 and 16 bytes, respectively). Thus, if the encrypted data length in bytes is a multiple of 8, it's likely to be a block ...


1

If you want command line arguments, you'll need to change the prototype of your main function a little bit and use the standard argv array: int main(int argc, const char** argv) { std::string s("AceInfinity's Example"); if (argc != 3) { std::cout << "Usage: -e text\n" << " -d text\n"; return 0; } ...


1

If you encrypt an APK, the system must have a key to decrypt it so that it can run. However, the attacker could root the device to obtain the key and then decrypt it. After the app is decrypted, Java is not difficult to reverse engineer. Unfortunately, there is no fool-proof way of preventing the reverse engineering of Android apps. The best option is ...


1

Nope. Storing is part of minting the token and the only way to encrypt data is with a call out to JS or Java.


1

If your code works in-memory, then you can test the following chain: get encrypted bytes array write it into the file read it from the file compare original encrypted bytes array vs read from the file Unit-testing forever!


1

The problem is that the decrypted plaintext has the correct padding about once in eight times. This happens when the decrypted plaintext ends with 01 to 20. The block size of 256 / 32 bytes makes for a valid padding for that particular range. Padding should never be used to verify correctness of ciphertext/plaintext. It is even dangerous to do so as it may ...


1

Decryption should shift in the opposite direction of encryption. def decrypt(message): return helper(message, -x) Now you can decrypt and encrypt with the same cipher number. x = 5 msg = "hello" print("plaintext message:", msg) print("encrypted message:", encrypt(msg)) print("decrypted message:", decrypt(encrypt(msg))) Result: plaintext message: ...


1

It's a bit more difficult if you're doing Universal App. But to get you started using Windows.Security.Cryptography; using Windows.Security.Cryptography.Core; HashAlgorithmProvider hap = HashAlgorithmProvider.OpenAlgorithm(HashAlgorithmNames.Sha256); CryptographicHash ch = hap.CreateHash(); // read in bytes from file then append with ...


1

Working within comments was getting difficult.. In this post, I don't salt hashes, but it's just example stuff, you should definitely salt (add random, but consistent, string data). Are you familiar with hashing? There is no need to encrypt passwords in a decryptable format. Instead, you can hash the user's entered password each time they enter it ...


1

XOR every byte in the string with (length of the string modulus 256). If Mod returns 0, use some other known and fixed non-zero value. I state this answer at the risk of security gurus coming back and saying.. bad answer.. don't do that.. leave it for us (security experts) etc etc.. But you already indicated what you really want is some form of obscurity, ...



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