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6

"PHP Custom two way encryption and decryption", what i am doing wrong? You're trying to write custom encryption.


3

Many encryption tools (and libraries) allow you to provide a 'password', which it uses to derive an appropriately sized key. In order to prevent ambiguity, the term cryptographic key is often used to refer to the N-bit key used with an encryption algorithm. If you look at the code on the page you linked, it's calculating a SHA-1 hash of the key you gave it, ...


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Deterministic encryption leaks if two messages are the same. This is particularly severe with asymmetric encryption, since an attacker can encrypt an unlimited number of chosen messages. To avoid this weakness, standard RSA padding is randomized. The code you posted is not related to that randomization, it merely converts binary data to a printable hex ...


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Well, your code works for me on Linux (compiled with GCC 4.8.2), even using your sample input and key. This suggests that the issue is specific to Windows — most likely, that it's caused by stdin and stdout being in text mode by default. (On Linux and other Unix-ish systems, there's usually no difference between text mode and binary mode, so such ...


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There is no guarentee cipher text will not contain escape sequence like \n, which make getline() get wrong string(truncated). So it is recommended to transform the cipher text to hex or something else to avoid escape sequence.


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ekl is a size_t, and you are casting it to an (int*). The docs for EVP_SealInit say: The actual size of each encrypted secret key is written to the array ekl. You're just passing one key, so passing the address of a single integer is sufficient, but you should be passing the address of that integer, e.g.: EVP_SealInit(rsaCtx, EVP_aes_256_cbc(), ...


2

Rather than converting to byte[] as an intermediate step when passing to different stream objects you can chain multiple streams together, passing the output from one to the input of another. This approach makes sense here, as you are chaining together Binary Serialization => Encryption => Writing to File. With this in mind, you can change ...


2

Your decryption code looks wrong: cipher.doFinal(data.getBytes()) Your data variable is a string, but strings can't hold raw encrypted data without corrupting it. Unless your ciphertext is actually hex-encoded or base64-encoded etc. In which case, getBytes() is not the right way to decode that into a byte array. So either fix the way you are sending your ...


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It's an encoding algorithm (hence "Base64 encoding") to allow people to move data in an ASCII friendly environment (i.e. no control characters or anything non-printable). It should give you good portability with XML and JSON etc. The encoding is entirely well known, the algorithm is simple and as it has not "mutability" of the algorithm or concept of keys ...


2

The PKCS#1 v1.5 Padding that is used by JSBN and your Crypto++ code is a random padding, so if you encrypt data with the same key it will look differently. You have to check whether your implementation works by encrypting on one end and decrypting on the other in both directions.


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Your problem is that the key itself is made of upper and lower case chars. SO it works well for BaR as this word has the same case as the key BaZ, but for Foo the last o is lower case and the key is upper so the computation LtrNum = keyword[j % keyLen] - 'a' is wrong. I can suggest you to convert every char of the key to upper (for example) so that your ...


2

This is impossible to solve. You should use some kind of encryption or signature scheme to make sure the data is not tampered with in combination with obfuscation so that the secret algorithm or secret key cannot be easily extracted from the ciphertext. Since this is about tamper protection and not data confidentiality, I would suggest to you to use a ...


2

So you can do it like this: create an empty sorted map \ create a 64 bit counter (you don't need more than 2^63 inputs, in all probability, since you would be dead before they would be calculated - unless quantum crypto really takes off) use the counter as input, probably easiest to encode it in 8 bytes; use this as input for your hash function; encode ...


2

You should consider using an encryption library. The answer to your question is because you are using global variable. It is really a bad practice to do so : global $base_encryption_array ; /* this makes keys as values and values as keys */ $base_encryption_array = array_flip($base_encryption_array); You keep flipping the array, in your 2nd loop (when ...


1

There are several ways you may want to use hashes in cryptography. You have already mentioned one of them. However, you could use them as part of digital signature. In digital signature, you can use the Hash to verify the integrity of the message. You may also want to see this.


1

I should think that instead of bothering with the ssl_create_cipher_list, you would instead override the negotiation phase (where ciphers are sent) and send any invalid ciphers which you want. In other words, anything not on this list.


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There is no FIPS 140-2 compliant .Net Framework implementation of the MD5 hash algorithm. You'll have to use SHA1 (System.Security.Cryptography.SHA1CryptoServiceProvider ) or SHA256 (System.Security.Cryptography.SHA256CryptoServiceProvider) instead. Yes you will need to re-hash the passwords for it to work.


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The "encrypted-core-data" project has limitations for average to complex data models. In my iOS app, we had some many-to-many relations, and some one-to-many relations between certain entities. The bridge code (code that bridges core data to SQLCihper) has lackings such as it doesn't have the NSOrderedSet implementation. Modifying the bridge code was a ...


1

You need to apply a padding scheme to your input, and remove the padding after the decrypt. gcrypt doesn't handle it for you. The most common choice is PKCS#7. A high level overview is that you fill the unused bytes in your final block with the number of padded bytes (block_size - used_bytes). If your input length is a multiple of the block size, you follow ...


1

An encoding algorithm merely presents data in an alternative format. It does not in any way attempt to hide data, it merely expresses the same data in an alternative syntax. Base64 is such an encoding algorithm. It merely encodes arbitrary data using only ASCII characters, which is useful in many situations in which non-ASCII characters may not be handled ...


1

The problem is in this line in the encrypt1 function: int keyIndex = alphabet.get(passwordPos++ % password.length()); Here you're trying to look up a key in the password, but you're actually getting it from the alphabet. What you want is to find the relevant character from the password (looping around when you reach the end), and then find out what the ...


1

VFP does not have any native encryption functionality. Those DLLs you list are just the VFP 7 runtimes, and a Visual C++ runtime which the VFP 7 runtimes have a dependency on. What I would do is: Download Process Explorer from sysinternals.com. Start it, then run your VFP program executable. Find your program EXE in Process Monitor processes column ...


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I think your problem is that you try to use a byte string input without somehow endian correcting it so that the same mathematical calculations are being done on different endian platforms: void Blowfish::Encrypt(void *Ptr,unsigned int N_Bytes) { unsigned int i; DWord *Work; if (N_Bytes%8) { cerr << "\aBlowfish requires the input to be a ...


1

You can let Spring Security keep the password in the session: <authentication-manager alias="authenticationManager" erase-credentials="false"> <!-- authentication provider(s) --> </authentication-manager> Then you can retrieve the password by using: Authentication currentAuth = ...; String pwd = ...


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The purpose is relatively clear. It's in the function name. It takes an array of bytes and transforms it into a hex string,


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PKCS7Padding is a padding scheme that always pads. When the plaintext is a multiple of the block length, then an additional block is added with each byte set to the value of the block length (modulo 256). This removes ambiguity: what if the last byte of the plain text was 01? It would look like 1 byte of padding and be stripped. So just remove that from ...


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RSAES_PKCS1v15_Encryptor enc(pubKey); StringSource ss1(data, true, new PK_EncryptorFilter(rng, enc, new StringSink(retStr) )); ... StringSource ss2((const byte*)retStr.data(), retStr.size(), true, new Base64Encoder( new StringSink(retData2) )); I'm not sure this is correct for interop'ing with ...


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Yes, strings etc are immutable and maybe stay in memory for a long time until the next GC cycle. To overcome this, you store the secret in a mutable object. For example, in a basic array: var secret = ['s','e','c','r','e','t']; Now, you can simple erase the information my nulling out the array elements: var len = secret.length for (var i=0; i<len; ...


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I would use an alias in the select: stmt = connect.prepareStatement("SELECT AES_DECRYPT(password, username) as decrypted_password FROM userdetails WHERE username = ?"); And read the values from the ResultSet. oldPassword = passwordData.getString("decrypted_password"); I honestly do not know if JDBC allows columns names like ...


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The problem is that ECB doesn't use an IV and that CBC - and most other modes of operation do use an IV value. Java randomizes the IV value when it is not explicitly given, which means that the plaintext after decryption is not correct. For AES CBC mode this means that the first 16 bytes of the plaintext - the initial block - contains random characters. As ...



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