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0

I found the answer for the issue in line 35 Key secKey = (Key) keyStore.getKey("mySecretKey", "javaci123".toCharArray()); // line 35 For encryption I had also set a password for the password i.e padding for the password is pw-password Key secKey = (Key) keyStore.getKey("mySecretKey", "pw-password".toCharArray()); // line 35 after ...


0

I solved this without needing to spawn a process by interoperating with openssl: @@OPENSSL_MAGIC = "Salted__" @@DEFAULT_CIPHER = "aes-256-cbc" @@DEFAULT_MD = OpenSSL::Digest::SHA256 # Resulting bytes when written to #{FILE} may be decrypted from the command # line with `openssl enc -d -#{cipher} -md #{md} -in #{FILE}` # # Example: # openssl enc -d ...


1

There's a command line tool called Script Encoder - best to give you a link to Microsoft's own pages about it http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/d14c8zsc(v=vs.84).aspx


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Since you are reading from a file and writing to a file just replace the memory streams by IOStream or FileStream. You'll have to refactor the procedures a bit so they don't expect/return byte arrays.


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The cause is not related to the Hive. The encrypted string is separated by CRLFs, so you should remove the \r\n at the end of your encryption method: return new Text(EncText.toString().replaceAll("\r|\n", ""));


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In you case you should take efforts to decrypt the iPhone backup password then you can access to SQLite DB files. You can have a try with the following method: Download and install iPhone Backup Unlocker (http://www.windowspasswordsrecovery.com/product/iphone-backup-unlocker.htm) on your computer and run it after the installation. Click on "Add" on the ...


0

from hashlib import md5 def keygen(f, pk): if len(f) > len(pk)*16: pk = '' return (ord(ch) for letter in pk for ch in md5(letter).digest())


0

You need to implement the method that creates $gamma. Then to encode or decode create $gamma and xor it with the input. Note: using home-build encryption is never a good idea, it always suffers from flaws, instead use standard AES. Since this is encryption you will have to obtain export permission for an app and that will probably be rather hard with a ...


0

Ok, a lot more digging and creative googling - and I found my answer: this great Miva_Password PHP class by Brandon0 on GitHub. I created a simple test - and managed to match the password hash. Unfortunately, to do this properly, I'd have to make quite a few changes to classes/Customer.php class in Prestashop to replace the current md5 hashing with the ...


0

Yes symmetric ciphers which operate on blocks require input to be multiple of block length. Due to this you can use some padding scheme before you perform the encryption, and make the data multiple of block length. During decryption, you can remove the extra bytes - due to padding scheme you know how much bytes you can remove. Here is for example how PKCS5 ...


0

The PHP code you are trying to translate does not implement simple XOR encoding of the type that you've implemented in your Objective-C code. It is using a rather odd scheme (based on SHA1) for generating a non-repeating pad to XOR against the input. The PHP equivalent of your Objective-C code would be simply: function strcode($str, $passwd) { return ...


2

HTTP talks over some sort of communication channel. TLS is a protocol that allows you to construct a secure communication channel over an insecure communication channel. HTTPS is TLS wrapped around HTTP. From your application’s point of view (using the TLS communication channel), everything will be in plaintext, since TLS is handling all of the encryption ...


0

UnrecoverableKeyException kind of identifies the problem, especially if the root cause is "Given final block not properly padded". This basically means that your password is incorrect. The KeyStore will first generate a key from the given password and they uses that key to decrypt the stored key. If the decryption fails you hope for a MAC authentication ...


0

Turns out my problem was obvious. It was in the way I had written my compatibility check function. Basically It took two inputs, Key and User_input. So it was supposed to check Key for a variety of things and change it if it didn't meet them. Unfortunately I had overlooked the fact that it was just changing its internal variable 'Key', which has the same ...


2

Your Key variable is an empty string: >>> Key = '' >>> Key[0] Traceback (most recent call last): File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module> IndexError: string index out of range That's because you are never changing the global Key variable, only a local. global statements must be put in the function: def Compatibility_check(Key, ...


0

If you have exactly the same input and the inputs are exactly the right length you will get exactly the same result. The one issue: the same padding must be used for each but you are not using padding in the decryption, you are doing something external for padding.


0

i am in middle of developing application that do like you asked, your code helped me well. in client module you did double decryption... my code looks like this CipherInputStream c_decf = new CipherInputStream(decf, decipher); FileOutputStream destf = new FileOutputStream(destfile); //CipherOutputStream cout = new CipherOutputStream(destf, ...


0

Your encryption system is safe and secure just as this $user_input = "someone"; $pass_input = "something"; $auth_credentials = hash("sha512", md5(sha1(md5($user_input . $pass_input)))); echo $auth_credentials; test and feedback.


0

Ssh works by first exchanging the public encryption keys in open during the handshake. All the subsequent data is encrypted using these publicly exchanged keys. This works because this is a special type of key exchange, even if the middle man gets the public keys he won't be able to decrypt it without the private keys of the users (which will never be ...


0

For the wsdl that is used in the server, the address location is actually ignored, and it should be reset to the URL that the wsdl is served from. Let say you set it to https in the wsdl, and serve with tomcat running http on port 8080, the client that gets hold of this wsdl via the ?wsdl url will get it for http and not https. Hence using the ...


1

Just to clarify: MD and SHA algorithms are HASH algorithms: they calculate a check sum of given data so you can later verify that it hasn't been altered. Think of it like this: Your data is 592652. You want a checksum to know this hasnt been altered so, you do something like: 5+9+2+6+5+2=29 2+9=11 1+1=2 Now, when you want to check your data, you can put ...


0

I got it, just as the http://www.logstash.net/docs/1.4.2/extending/ use ruby to write your code ,it could import the third part package .and everything will be ok .


2

Just a suggestion. Have you looked at the collation for the name field in your database? Make sure it is on something like utf8_general_ci. Then be sure to print the encrypted $name variable before updating to database to be sure it contains the correct value. Hope this helps.


0

From the look of things, you are writing the encrypted bytes to the file, and then trying to read them back as text into a Scanner. That won't work, as you have found. If you want your file to be text, then you need to convert the bytes to Base64 and write as text. On reading the Base64 text, convert back to bytes and decypher. Java 8 has the Base64 ...


0

Got it! Here is the result of my research. My initial JENKINS_HOME/.gitignore file was as follows: # Miscellaneous Jenkins litter *.log *.tmp *.old *.json # Generated Jenkins state /.owner /queue.xml /fingerprints/ /shelvedProjects/ /updates/ /logs/ # Credentials /secrets/ secret.key # Job state builds/ workspace/ modules/ lastStable lastSuccessful ...


0

Convert your string to a byte array during encryption. Convert back to a string after decryption. /** * Creates a cipher for encryption or decryption. * * @param algorithm PBE algorithm like "PBEWithMD5AndDES" or "PBEWithMD5AndTripleDES". * @param mode Encyrption or decyrption. * @param password Password * @param salt Salt usable with algorithm. * ...


-1

/** * Creates a cipher for encryption or decryption. * * @param algorithm PBE algorithm like "PBEWithMD5AndDES" or "PBEWithMD5AndTripleDES". * @param mode Encyrption or decyrption. * @param password Password * @param salt Salt usable with algorithm. * @param count Iterations. * @return Ready initialized cipher. * @throws GeneralSecurityException ...


0

if you want a text file for an idea you have there is the code try{ String url="./src/keys/mykey.txt",key="my key"; FileWriter fw=new FileWriter(url); BufferedWriter bw=new BufferedWriter(fw); bw.write(emp.toString()); bw.newLine(); bw.close(); fw.close(); }catch(Exception e){ e.printStackTrace(); } ...


0

The solution for this scenario: First of all, import the .cer file to your own keystore: keytool -importcert -v -trustcacerts -file "path\to\file.cer" -alias myAlias -keystore "myNewKeyStore.jks" -storepass myPass Put the file under your classpath If you are using maven, configure it to include .jks files and NO FILTERING for this kind of resource. This ...


0

first fix the imports ok, that a litle way a made using the xmlencoder library pretty simple and usefull public class xmlBaseTool implements Serializable{ public static String loadKey(String url) throws FileNotFoundException, IOException{ try { FileInputStream fis=new FileInputStream(url); BufferedInputStream bis=new ...


0

The problem is the usage of OpenOrCreate instead of Create. The reason being is that OpenOrCreate will create a FileStream for appending to the end of a file, if the file already exists. Whereas Create will delete the existing file before creating a new file. public static void SerializeObject(string filename, object objectToSerialize) { using (Stream ...


2

Don't forget to call getBytes("UTF-8") or your encoding may be off. Something like String str1 = "unoshriram"; String outHash = "95e5f0b6988ec703e832172f70ce7dc7"; try { MessageDigest md = MessageDigest.getInstance("MD5"); byte[] array = md.digest(str1.getBytes("UTF-8")); StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder(); for (byte b : array) { ...


1

The ISP at the other end of the tunnel can see the plaintext traffic that that machine sends at your behest. The point of a tunnel is to cross an untrusted connection so that you can send requests from a trusted connection.


0

I haven't been able to find the $StringHelper::encrypt function, but if it is compatible, you just need to also perform cipher.final in your Ruby code and concatenate the output of update and final as clearly specified in the instructions.


2

AES is a block cipher. Block ciphers only encrypt blocks, in case of AES, blocks of 128 bits / 16 bytes. To use a block cipher for larger amounts of data you need a mode of operation. There are modes of operation such as AES-CBC and the insecure AES-ECB that do require padding, as they encrypt/decrypt per block as well. For AES you can be certain that the ...


0

Here's a simple solution with a couple of caveats. Invalid Input It is not protected against a request to decrypt a non-number. It will throw an exception - not normally an acceptable response to user error. It still appears to have a bug because when I encrypt "cat" I get 7*3*73=1533 that's fine. But when I decrypt 1533 I get "act" which is 3*7*73. Shome ...


0

I haven't done any homework this quick in my life. Please check the edge cases. public class Homework3 { static int[] primes = {3, 5, 7, 11, 13, 17, 19, 23, 29, 31, 37, 41, 43, 47, 53, 59, 61, 67, 71, 73, 79, 83, 89, 97, 101, 103}; static String alphabet = "abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz"; Map<Integer, Character> encryptMap = new HashMap<Integer, ...


0

python does not offer builtin encyption, but there are plenty of good packages you can use. The python website recommends pycrypto http://www.pycrypto.org. Here's a sample of how you could use it in your application import boto import gcs_oauth2_boto_plugin import requests from Crypto.Cipher import DES url = 'https://www.example.com/file.tar.gz' r = ...


0

Long story short: def keygen(f, pk): #takes file f as input (here data size is less than 4126bytes) l=len(f) if l <= 28*16: for i in pk: a=md5(i.encode()) yield a.digest()


0

The suites are defined together with the various SSL/TLS versions. Wikipedia provides you with a good overview and with links to all necessary standards. In your case: TLS_PSK_WITH_AES_128_CBC_SHA is defined for SSL3.0 already.


3

Have you tried changing the 'key' value in your app/config/app.php? It looks like the system just started making sure you have it set to non default value. UPDATE: just updated my own copy of laravel (to 4.2.13) and tried this out - the error is thrown if you leave the key value set to default as I wrote earlier. Simply set it to 32 random character ...


1

Yes, Flask-Security does use per-user salts by design if using bcrypt (and other schemes such as des_crypt, pbkdf2_sha256, pbkdf2_sha512, sha256_crypt, sha512_crypt). The config for 'SECURITY_PASSWORD_SALT' is only used for HMAC encryption. If you are using bcrypt as the hashing algorithm Flask-Security uses passlib for hashing and it generates a random ...


-1

It was my mistake. The second substring should be (16,16) as Ebbe suggested. Thanks Ebbe!


2

And it will change every time I run code. Yes. That's due to Optimal Asymmetric Encryption Padding (OAEP). If you send the same message twice, like Attack at dawn, your adversary who observes the message won't be able to learn anything (or make an educated guess) when he sees the message again. The property is known as semantic security or Ciphertext ...


1

If you have GPG installed then there's a fast, easy, reliable way: open("|gpg [options]","w"){|f| f.syswrite(data) } Here's how I do it: data = "Hello World" password = "letmein" output = "/tmp/out.gpg" gpg = "/usr/local/bin/gpg --symmetric --cipher-algo aes256 --digest-algo sha256 --cert-digest-algo sha256 --compress-level 0 ...


1

To show how much fun it is to create some functions that are fail fast I've written the following 3 functions. One creates an AES key, one encodes it and one decodes it back. These three methods can be used with Java 8 (without dependence of internal classes or outside dependencies): public static SecretKey generateAESKey(int keysize) throws ...


1

This is much more a question of the mode of operation than of the used block cipher. There are modes that will flip only a single bit (CTR), but there are also modes that will randomize all bits (BiIGE) which is supported by e.g. OpenSSL. The cryptographic property of bit errors in ciphertext affecting the plaintext is called error propagation. CTR is a ...


0

The exception occurs since you are using MuleHeaderCredentialsAccessor and have not set the header MULE_USER or it is set to a value that does not match any uid in the keyring. Either you have to set this header (inbound property) or implement your own CredentialsAccessor that returns the correct credentials. You can find the code for ...


2

The solution is pretty simple! You store the return value of print in your variable and this is always 1! (See: http://php.net/manual/en/function.print.php) So change this: //... $inputText = print ${"filtered"}; //print will always return 1 and you want to store the variable and not the print return value //... to this: //... echo $filtered; ...


2

This really depends on the mode of operation that you used. AES is a block cipher. So the actual AES algorithm is only defined for blocks of 128-bit. Everything else is the mode. For example: For ECB AES is executed for every block separately. This means that only those blocks differ which contain the flipped bits. But since AES is strong the degree they ...



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