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0

What endianness has received packet in Java? It has whatever the sender put in it. Are these numbers automatically converted to big-endian upon receival? Java doesn't change anything.


0

ok great found it the decode format is "MS-DOS: 32 bit Hex Value". for example, value to Decode: 36BFFD44 Date and Time decoded: Tue, 29 July 2014 23:57:44 Local now all i need to figure out is how to convert it! yikes!


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As stated in a comment by bitbank, this means you're passing a JPEG file to it when it expects to get a TIFF file.


-1

It depends on CPU, but do not forget that .Net uses virtual machine named CLR underneath.


1

Take a look at this answer: http://stackoverflow.com/a/105339/1461424 If you're using Visual C++ do the following: You include intrin.h and call the following functions: For 16 bit numbers: unsigned short _byteswap_ushort(unsigned short value); For 32 bit numbers: unsigned long _byteswap_ulong(unsigned long value); For 64 bit numbers: ...


1

This is my sample. It reverses the endianess of an integer. Notice that C doesn't specify the size of int. It could be 16, 32, 64 ... Using the (uint_16t, uint_32t, uint_64t) instead if you want to ensure the size, void reverse_endianess(int* number) { char byte_arr[8] = {0}; int i; for (i=0; i < sizeof(int); i++) { byte_arr[i] = ...


1

These are not standard function (these are gcc extensions), but you may be able to use them: — Built-in Function: uint16_t __builtin_bswap16 (uint16_t x) Returns x with the order of the bytes reversed; for example, 0xaabb becomes 0xbbaa. Byte here always means exactly 8 bits. — Built-in Function: uint32_t __builtin_bswap32 (uint32_t x) Similar ...


4

This one of the functions I wrote for the Parrot VM, you can download byteorder.c from parrotcode.org. There are probably shorter ways to do it, but this works for different size integers, and we had a macro to detect the byteorder of the platform in PARROT_BIGENDIAN, you can discard all that. Also, as mentioned above, you can search out htonl() which is a ...


0

You may want to have a look at this answer, which shows how to convert both ways, also with different byte sizes. This is one way to do it, but more efficient ways are discussed in the thread linked. uint32_t num = 9; uint32_t b0,b1,b2,b3,b4,b5,b6,b7; uint32_t res = 0; b0 = (num & 0xf) << 28; b1 = (num & 0xf0) << 24; b2 = (num & ...


2

b'0b11111111' consists of 10 bytes: In [44]: list(b'0b11111111') Out[44]: ['0', 'b', '1', '1', '1', '1', '1', '1', '1', '1'] whereas b'0xff' consists of 4 bytes: In [45]: list(b'0xff') Out[45]: ['0', 'x', 'f', 'f'] Clearly, they are not the same objects. Python values explicitness. (Explicit is better than implicit.) It does not assume that ...


1

Bytes can represent any number of things. Python cannot and will not guess at what your bytes might encode. For example, int(b'0b11111111', 34) is also a valid interpretation, but that interpretation is not equal to hex FF. The number of interpretations, in fact, is endless. The bytes could represent a series of ASCII codepoints, or image colors, or ...


0

You are confusing strings and integers uint32_t i = 12345; printf("%08X\n", i); /* 00003039 */ i = ntohl(i); printf("%08X\n", i); /* either 00003039 or 39300000 */ Depending on the endianness of your platform, you either get the same output or a bytewise reversed one.


0

You need something like this: int little = ntohl(*((uint32_t*)s)); otherwise you're only passing a char to ntohl, which is why your value is being truncated.


0

Alternatively, function isLittleEndian() { return unpack('S',"\x01\x00")[1] === 1; }


0

No, it doesn't. The code you described never converts the addresses to host byte order. So the host's byte order does not affect the contents of the array.


0

Here is a function can reverse byte order of any type. template <typename T> T bswap(T val) { T retVal; char *pVal = (char*) &val; char *pRetVal = (char*)&retVal; int size = sizeof(T); for(int i=0; i<size; i++) { pRetVal[size-1-i] = pVal[i]; } return retVal; }


0

BASH: od -b -v -w8 | while read pfx b8 ; do [ "$b8" ] && echo -n 12345678 | tr 87654321 \\${b8// /\\} ; done To be a bit more robust depending on the output style of od, it may need to compress spaces ( insert "| sed 's/ */ /g'" after the w8).


0

When you use the statement "UINT color = (UINT)WHITE" it is invoking the D3DXCOLOR operator DWORD () conversion. Since legacy D3DX9Math was designed for Direct3D 9, that's a BGRA color (equivalent to DXGI's DXGI_FORMAT_B8G8R8A8_UNORM). From d3dx9math.inl: D3DXINLINE D3DXCOLOR::D3DXCOLOR( DWORD dw ) { CONST FLOAT f = 1.0f / 255.0f; r = f * (FLOAT) ...


1

Note that the leftmost byte is usually the "first byte send/received" for cryptography; i.e. if you have an array then the lowest index is to the left. If nothing has been specified, then this is the ad-hoc standard. However, the Blowfish test vectors - as indicated by GregS - explicitly specify this default order, so there is no need to guess: ... All ...


0

If you read the file as a sequence of 4-byte words then you would need to account for the endianness of those words in the memory layout, swapping the bytes as required to ensure the individual bytes are handled in a consistent order. However, if you read/write your file as a sequence of bytes, and stored directly in sequence in memory (in an unsigned char ...


0

The other answers seem a bit outdated to me, so here's a link to the latest spec: http://www.khronos.org/registry/typedarray/specs/latest/#2.1 In particular: The typed array view types operate with the endianness of the host computer. The DataView type operates upon data with a specified endianness (big-endian or little-endian). So if you want ...


4

To convert two ints (containing double data) into a double, you don't need a temporary buffer. You can do this: long doubleBits = my_int_x & 0xFFFFFFFFL; doubleBits <<= 32; doubleBits |= my_int_y & 0xFFFFFFFFL; double myDouble = Double.longBitsToDouble(doubleBits); However, check how you are reading my_int_x and my_int_y in your Java ...


0

My inclination would be to avoid "overlay casts" as a means of reading structured data. If performance isn't critical, it may be helpful to define methods like: int getBE16(uint8_t **p) { // Big-endian 16-bit uint8_t *pp = *p; int result = pp[0]*256 + pp[1]; (*p)+=2; } int getLE16(uint8_t **p) { // Little-endian 16-bit uint8_t *pp = *p; int ...



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