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8

From extensive research I have come to the conclusion that implementing OAuth is not a viable authentication method for apps because of the simple fact that it is horrible to implement. After spending countless hours debugging and asking questions on Stackoverflow about a simple Twitter oAuth implementation, all while receiving countless wrong answers(which ...


6

Alright, finally got it working, thanks for the tips, Dan! Here are the remaining details that would have saved me a few hours - hopefully this is helpful to someone else. 1) As I expected and mentioned earlier, dev_appserver.py needs to be run with --host=0.0.0.0 so that it can listen on the local network. 2) In order to properly parse the ID token to ...


4

The distinction between the custom EndpointsAliasPropertys and one of the data properties you defined is how they are used. They are all used to create a protorpc message, and that message is then converted into an EndpointsModel with your custom data in it. THIS is where the magic happens. Breaking it down into steps: 1. You specify your data from ...


4

The Endpoints Proto Datastore API is not an official part of the App Engine SDK, but a library I have been working on. It is documented and I'm happy to come on here and answer your questions. As it turns out, EndpointsModel is a subclass of ndb.Model, so you are getting the best of both worlds: >>> from endpoints_proto_datastore.ndb import ...


4

It looks like you are using a 3rd party library since the endpoints_proto_datastore is not part of the core App Engine SDK. In short you will have to include this library in your project and then making sure that is in the path. Refer to this answer for more details.


4

For just this use case, EndpointsAliasProperty was created. It acts much like @property does in Python in that you can specify a getter, setter and doc, but no deleter is specified in this context. Since these properties will be sent over the wire and used with Google's API infrastructure, a type must be specified, so we can't just use @property. In ...


3

This is a temporary bug in Android Studio. Instead of using the Add as Library option (which wouldn't work anyway due to https://code.google.com/p/android/issues/detail?id=66610), instead go to File > Project Structure > Modules > your module > Dependencies > + button, File dependency, and select your jar from the file chooser.


3

The answer to this is somewhat similar to Simple Access API (Developer Key) with Google Cloud Endpoint (Python) In users_id_token.py, the request object is a ProtoRPC object that parsed an incoming request. However, even if the actual user did not specify on of the keys 'bearer_token' or 'access_token' as part of the ProtoRPC message definition, if they ...


3

You can use strings in the KeyProperty constructor to refer to kinds that don't have a model definition: class Event(ndb.Model): participants = ndb.KeyProperty(kind='User', repeated=True)


3

First, to answer your question: By default, the message schema for your requests and response will be the fields on your model: email, phone_number, reg_id, and created. As is done in the simple get sample, you can change this default to include id via class User(EndpointsModel): _message_fields_schema = ('id', 'email', 'phone_number', ...


2

Following the keys_with_ancestors sample, let's assume we have the same imports and have defined the class MyParent in the same way it is defined there. The TL;DR answer is essentially that passing parent= to the model constructor is equivalent to creating a key with None as the last ID in the list of kind, ID pairs. For example, for a class MyModel: ...


2

You are wanting to acquire a rather sensitive combination of information - user email (as identity), phone number, and location. So firstly, you'll have to be very considerate about privacy issues for users, having a policy on how this information is stored and distributed and make it clear to users what they are allowing. I would suggest not storing any ...


2

I'm assuming User is some custom model that inherits from EndpointsModel. If not, this will fail. In other words, you've done something like this: from google.appengine.ext import ndb from endpoints_proto_datastore.ndb import EndpointsModel class User(EndpointsModel): email = ndb.StringProperty() ... There are two primary approaches to solving ...


2

Yes, but you'll need to use an EndpointsAliasProperty with a name different than the lastmodified field. For example, you could do something like was done in the Picturesque app used as a sample at Google I/O 2013. First, define your model from google.appengine.ext import ndb from endpoints_proto_datastore.ndb import EndpointsModel class ...


2

Your setter is being called, and it is causing the behavior you don't want. Tearing it down: def IdSet(self, value): if not isinstance(value, basestring): raise TypeError('ID must be a string.') self.caseful_id = value self.UpdateFromKey(ndb.Key(self.__class__, value.lower())) since you call self.caseful_id = value before ...


2

You don't want a KeyProperty then. If you want to reference the other property use ndb.StructuredProperty: class Indicator(EndpointsModel): name = ndb.StringProperty(required=True) variables = ndb.StructuredProperty(Variable, repeated=True) In advanced cases like yours, where the referenced object may change, but the keys will not, you can use an ...


2

The way I'm doing it is to access the endpoint, the same way I would access any other Discovery-based API hosted somewhere else, by using use the Google APIs Client Library for Python which is compatible with endpoints. Normally you would build a client for one of the Google APIs using service = build(api, version, http=http) for example service = ...


2

You can not create such references to the entities. Here is somo solutions: 1. You must use normal StringProperty for Event.creator or other id for User instance 2. Remove evens from class User - you can reach to evens by index on class Events 3. Use third entity model like this: class EventCreator(EndpointsModel): creator = ndb.KeyProperty(kind=User) ...


2

Are you using the most recent SDK? A previous version was generating IDs that were too large for a javascript float to store, so two unique IDs could round/truncate to the same value. That your IDs end in 000 suggest this might be the cause. The latest version, and the live environment, don't suffer this problem.


2

I encountered the same Incorrect Operation Exception in Android Studio version 0.5.0. This post helped me: How do I add a library project to the Android Studio? To add your endpoints client library as library to your project, you can manually add your library to the Gradle project, in the settings.gradle file: Open settings.gradle, which should be in ...


2

See the docs about POSTing into the datastore, your only issue is that your models aren't EndpointsModels. Instead define a datastore model for both your Greeting and GreetingCollection: from endpoints_proto_datastore.ndb import EndpointsModel class Greeting(EndpointsModel): message = ndb.StringProperty() class GreetingCollection(EndpointsModel): ...


1

If it is the case that it is caused by an issue with "wraps" in functools, there is nothing stopping you from writing your own partial that does not call wraps. According to the python documentation, this is a valid implementation of partial: def partial(func, *args, **keywords): def newfunc(*fargs, **fkeywords): newkeywords = keywords.copy() ...


1

See the documentation for details on this The property id is one of five helper properties provided by default to help you perform common operations like this (retrieving by ID). In addition there is an entityKey property which provides a base64 encoded version of a datastore key and can be used in a similar fashion as id... This means that if ...


1

You could specify the key properties without the kind parameter (it is optional) and then do a manual check in your constructor or a pre-put hook or something like that -- or maybe not even worry about the kind: class Event(EndpointsModel): creator = ndb.KeyProperty() # Constructor option def __init__(self, *args, **kwargs): ...


1

name='WidgetTinyApi' is invalid. You need a lowercase value for this. From the documentation: The name value: Must begin with lowercase. Must match the regular expression [a-z]+[A-Za-z0-9]*.


1

You can define a response_message parameter in the decorator (as opposed to the more commonly used response_fields parameter) and set it to VoidMessage. And then return a VoidMessage from your method instead of the model. from protorpc import message_types (...) @Domain.method(request_fields=('id',), ...


1

This answer is not going to directly answer your question but should give you a good idea how you can implement authentication in a safe way. I've implemented something similar recently and spent quite some time figuring out which is the best way to do authentication with Google AppEngine environment. Google supports OpenId Connect protocol. Facebook's ...


1

Check out the paging sample from the documentation. In order for the paging parameters to be included in your API, you'll need to explicitly include them in your method: @Brand.query_method(query_fields=('limit', 'pageToken'), path='brand', http_method='GET', name='brand.list') def ...


1

You can do this by having an "alias" property called rating associated with your UserModel: from endpoints_proto_datastore.ndb import EndpointsAliasProperty class UserModel(EndpointsModel): ... def rating_set(self, value): # Do some validation self._rating = value @EndpointsAliasProperty(setter=rating_set) def ...


1

It's due to the fact that Javascripts stores the numbers using 64-bit floats. They already changed that and actually in the version 1.8.0 they fixed it and the auto ID is smaller so they can be represented in JSON. In the latest blog post they announced that in the upcoming version this will be guaranteed and the scattered auto IDs will be by default.



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