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5

Are you looking for something like this var context = new MyContext(); context.Database.Log = s => Debug.WriteLine(s); Then whenever a query is executed, you'll see something like this: var customers = context.Customers.ToList(); Opened connection at 30-3-2015 13:48:03 +02:00 SELECT [Extent1].[Guid] AS [Guid], ...


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If you have a DbContext on which you firing your LINQ queries you can simply set the DbContext.Database.Log property to something like this: yourContext.Database.Log = (msg => System.Diagnostics.Debug.Write(msg, "SQL")); After this, every SQL query shows up in the Debug console from your Visual Studio with the category SQL.


3

In order for lazy loading to work, two things have to happen: Lazy Loading must be enabled on the context The properties to be lazy-loaded must be virtual. In your case, you have explained that your property is not virtual, so it can't be lazy loaded. However, lazy loading is only needed if you want to access child entities or collections after loading ...


3

Those are not warnings you are seeing, those are Errors. The output tells you very clearly when a diagnostic message is a warning or an error. You've given the compiler an error number (6002) and told it to suppress the warning with that number, but such a warning does not exist. So, you've only succeeded in creating an additional error In this case, the ...


2

You can use SQL Profiler to see how the LINQ expression is translated into SQL statement.


2

use db.PRT_PARTNERS.FirstOrDefault(x=>x.PersonalNumber==personalNumber); or db.PRT_PARTNERS.Any(x=>x.PersonalNumber==personalNumber); Find method is used with keys. Look here Finds an entity with the given primary key values. If an entity with the given primary key values exists in the context, then it is returned immediately without making ...


2

Normally, the state of entities is tracked by Entity Framework. In web applications however, when an entity is retrieved from the database, it gets sent to the browser and Entity Framework can no longer "see" the entity and it can no longer track any changes made to it. Therefore you would have to manually tell Entity Framework if an entity coming in from ...


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I recommend you use GraphDiff. With this library your Update method would be as I show below: public void Update(IEnumerable<MyParentType> parents) { try { Add(parents.Where(x => x.parentID == 0)); var updatedData = parents.Where(x => x.parentID != 0); foreach (var parent in updatedData) { ...


1

I solved this by using Castle.DynamicProxy. I needed to have certain dependencies be injected "On Demand" meaning they needed to be resolved at time of use, not at time of "Depender" build up. To do this I configure my container like so: private void UnityRegister(IUnityContainer container) { container.RegisterType<HttpContextBase>(new ...


1

Forget about a direct relation 1 to N between Companies and ContactExtensions tables. That connection exists through the Contacts table. Then, if you want to reference a ContactExtensions from a Company instance you would do: var tenthContact = company.Contacts.ElementAt(10); var contactExtension = tenthContact.ContactExtension; If you want to do: var ...


1

Ok - I think I tracked down the problem. @GertArnold's answer helped me find the cause. The problem was that, for whatever reason, when I imported the view into Entity Framework, EF decided that two other (and unrelated) fields in the database should be used to construct the key and not Code (which is actually the key). I set Entity Key to True in the edmx ...


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An Entity Framework context is an identity map, i.e. it keeps a single copy of each entity in the database. Even when an object is re-fetched from the database, EF doesn't modify the values in the local copy. I think this is because it would interfere with change tracking and it could overwrite client-side changes that were made in the mean time. So it's by ...


1

You can use the Table Per Concrete Type inheritance mapping strategy. Create an abstract class Addressee that contains all the properties common to any addressee and then let your Customer, Supplier, and Store entities inherit from it. The collection property on your Invoice will be of type Addressee. In your entity mapping configuration, use the ...


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[From comment on the question] But in db it's name is PERSONAL_NUMBER But the model says it is personalNumber. So you need to tell EF: It is the key column: use Key attribute It has a different name in the database: use Column attribute.


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You can use the Log property of DataContext object. Also, it depends on the type of application you are using. For Web Application:- db.Log = Response.Output; For Console Application:- db.Log = Console.Out; Apart from this you can also use the GetCommand method of DataContext class. Sql Server Profiler is again an obvious option.


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You must firstly attach existing Genre to EF, then add to Book. using (var context = new MyContext()) { var genre= new Genre() { Genre= 15 }; context.Genres.Attach(genre); var book= new Book(); book.Genres.Add(genre); context.Books.Add(book); context.SaveChanges(); } Look at this post Many to Many Relationships not saving


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You could try to do this the opposite way: This means the ForeignKey DataAnnotaion on the other property: public long ObjectID { get; set; } [ForeignKey("ObjectID")] public virtual Core_TrackingInfo TrackingInfo { get; set; } Hope this helps!


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If you want to completely control how the layout is of the classes that are being used by EF, use code first. It is discussed in detail here : https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/magazine/hh148150.aspx


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I think @haldyr's answer was probably unfairly deleted as its correct. The latest version of SQL Azure (v12) DOES support DBCC CHECKIDENT (and a bunch of others) however if your azure database server isn't brand new you will need to upgrade. Upgrading is easy, go to your azure DB Server on the new portal (the actual server not the DB itself) and click the ...



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