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7

The reason why this is slow is you are using linq-to-objects in your Where clause, meaning you're executing the predicate on the client (C#) instead of the server (SQL), the C# is receiving 6000 database records and then filtering it in memory. You can see this because your filter parameter is of type Func, which implies you're using linq-to-objects by way ...


3

Why is everything getting cast to an int for comparisons? Because that's what the C# language defines. It doesn't define any operators on byte, short etc - they're all promoted to int before anything happens. That gets propagated to expression trees too. As an example: using System; using System.Linq.Expressions; public class Test { public static ...


2

You could make use of GroupBy, like below: var map = new var map = new Dictionary<string, double>(); var groups = _db.UserSurveyResultToBeRevieweds1 .Where(x=>x.refKey == singleQuestionsLists.referenceKey && x.type == questionTypeSAQ && x.questionId == ...


2

Convert the image to a byte and store that in the database. Add this column to your model: public byte[] Content { get; set; } Then convert your image to a byte array and store that like you would any other data: public byte[] imageToByteArray(System.Drawing.Image imageIn) { MemoryStream ms = new MemoryStream(); ...


2

From the command line you can run something like the following: Update-package -Id Entityframework -ProjectName xxx However on solution level I always find it quite easier to do it using UI: Manage NuGet Packages Search for EntityFramework Install it on one of your projects Go to Installed Packages + Manage Tick all the projects you want to have the EF ...


2

If you don't give a sort order, the return of any statement is not ordered. That means theoretically, even two executions of the same statement in SQL server may produce differently ordered results. For all pratical purposes, the sort order for "unordered" will likely stay the same, because it's just a computer program that always does the same, but it's ...


1

You can use Contains. var answers = optionsList.Select((v, i) => Convert.ToString(i)).ToArray(); int totalCount = _db.UserSurveyResultToBeRevieweds1 .Where(x=>x.refKey == singleQuestionsLists.referenceKey && x.type == questionTypeSAQ && x.questionId == ...


1

Thanks. I was already on the way to try and use reflection... I ended up replacing the attachedEntry.CurrentValues.SetValues(entity); call with SetAttachedEntityValues(attachedEntity, entity, new string[] { "Payout", "Client", "Country" }); which calls a method that copies all properties except the ones specified on the array: private void ...


1

I also experienced the same issue while using Database first approach. Connection string in my service's/service's host web.config was incorrect. I corrected the connection string and it worked.


1

Firstly, note that you cannot point a normal delegate at a method with ConditionalAttribute. However, you are using a lambda, so that compiles OK. But what does it actually compile to? Consider this code: Action<string> print = message => Debug.WriteLine(message); print("TEST"); For a debug build this compiles to: Action<string> print = ...


1

You want to use a Custom Code First Convention. There's an example of exactly what you are trying to do here: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/data/jj819164.aspx


1

Current values will set all scalar properties. If you want to have custom mapping, you can use reflection. foreach (var name in propertyNames) { var value = entity.GetType().GetProperty(name).GetValue(entity, null); attachedEntity.GetType().GetProperty(name).SetValue(attachedEntity, value); }


1

Maybe you forgot to .Close your connection before. that's why: Or it could have timed out while attempting to create multiple active connections. (I cant comment for now due to my reputation, dont take this as a full answer)


1

Use SqlFunctions.StringConvert like: Value = SqlFunctions.StringConvert((double)cat.CategoryID) The other option is to enumerate all records in memory and then use ToString like: from sup in northwind.Suppliers.AsEnumerable() select new SelectListItem { Text = sup.CompanyName, Value = sup.SupplierID.ToString(), Selected = p.Supplier.SupplierID == ...


1

I think what you're looking for are cases where the DataAnnotation validation will not give you the flexibility you need. For example, I need an address which can either be selected via a dropdown or entered. If one of the entered address lines is there then all of them need to be there. That's tough to check with DataAnnotations alone. What I've done in ...


1

Based on the link you gave, probably you miss this part. Now you can either create your own .config file in this project and add the connectionstring entry of your model or simply copy the App.config file that you created in the MyEntityModel project, in your Console App project. We will adopt the simpler way. Right click the project > Add ...


1

I found the answer. I missed adding the public int Id {get; set; } field on one of my objects and apparently Entity Framework doesn't like that.


1

When you call Database.CreateIfNotExists(), it doesn't trigger the InitializeDatabase of the initializer. Basically it has separated implementation than the initializer. If you want the Seed method to be fired. You need to execute a code that causes EF to send a query to the database. First remove this line. Database.CreateIfNotExists(); Then just ...


1

Please try it var prof = (from p in Profile join ud in UserDrive on p.id equals ud.profileId join d in drive on ud.driveid equals d.Id where p.ProfileId == Cuser.ProfileId select new { p,ud,d}).tolist(); string a = prof.p.columnname; string b = prof.ud.columnname; string c = prof.d.columnname;


1

You just need to select the Drive property instead of the UserDrive. Like this: var prof = (from p in pe.UserDrives.Include("Drive") where p.ProfileId == Cuser.ProfileId select p.Drive).ToList();


1

Create the database and then use this tutorial : http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/data/jj200620.aspx. This should help


1

namespace MvcApplication4.Models { [Table("tb_book")] public class Book { [Key] public int ID { get; set; } public string Title { get; set; } [InverseProperty("Books")] public Author Author { get; set; } } [Table("tb_author")] public class Author { [Key] public int ID { get; set; } public string Name { get; set; } ...


1

You can solve it like this: 1) Create an interface like this: public interface IIsReadOnly { bool IsReadOnly { get; set; } } 2) Implement this interface in all of the entities that can be cached. When you read and cache them, set the IsReadOnly property to true. This flag will be used when SaveChanges is invoked. Remember to decorate this property ...


1

Yes it possible. And here you can find a tutorial about it from Oracle .


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It's not a matter of Entity Framework supporting Oracle. It's the other way around. Entity Framework supports any data source, as long as a provider is written for it. You need to install an Oracle provider with EF support. If I'm not mistaken, the latest version of ODP.NET, which is downloadable from Oracle, has EF support. It will generate a model ...


1

First, check where your deadlocks are coming from. That will help you find your problem areas - the areas you need to fix. Sometimes ORMs have issues with complex logic. One option is to provide Entity Framework with a stored procedure for reading and writing to your more data-intensive tables. In your controller or repository layer, you can execute a ...



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