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6

LINQ has two syntaxes - query syntax, which looks like declarative query and uses integrated into language keywords: var query = from x in something where x.Foo == 42 select x.Bar; And imperative method syntax, which is based on usual methods as you have provided. Same query in method syntax will look like: var query = ...


3

You need to set up a nullable foreign key because the relationship EF is infering by convention implies every record has a parent which is obviously impossible as some item has to be the root. Try the following: public class ProductCategory { [Key] public int CategoryID { get; set; } [ForeignKey("ParentCategory")] public int? ...


3

you have a parenthesis in the wrong spot in your LINQ: db.Products.OrderBy(x => x.Name.Skip(pageno* 8).Take(8).ToList()); You want: db.Products.OrderBy(x => x.Name).Skip(pageno* 8).Take(8).ToList(); As it is, it's not actually performing the query until the view (and then erroring), because you aren't calling ToList on the outer query. EF only ...


2

to summarize comments: what you want (i.e.: 5 tables) is a many to many relation for Entity Framework. By conventions you get it by setting a collection on both entities Foo { ICollection<Bar> Bars } Foo { ICollection<Foo> Foos } if you don't want the reverse collections (Foos) then you have to setup the relation by the fluent ...


2

Written as regards to Entity Framework v6.1.1 implementation. If you are looking for a specific classes like GeographyPoint instead of DBGeography for your property then there's no such in Entity Framework implementation. All geography-related stuff for Entity Framework is concentrated in one System.Data.Entity.Spatial.DBGeography class. Instance of such ...


2

I believe Entity Framework does not support statement lambdas only expressions. You may have more luck if you can somehow convert the if statement into a conditional expression. It seems that you are trying to sort on multiple properties. I think this would be easier to do using the ThenBy method.


1

Your version is essentially correct but it does over-complicate things. Try public IEnumerable<UserRole> GetUserRoles(int userID) { using (var ctx = new DataEntities()) { return ctx.Users.Where(x => x.UserID == userID) .Select(x => x.UserRoles.ToList()) ...


1

For inserting data into the database you need to write the following code in the IService.cs file which contains the two sections: OperationContract DataContract The OperationContract section is used to add service operations and DataContract is used to add types to service operations. Here I am creating a function in the OperationContract section of the ...


1

Have you tried something like this?: using (CrystalReportsTestEntities db = new CrystalReportsTestEntities()) { List<Stock> stocks = db.Stocks.Where(item => item.StockSalePrice > 5).ToList(); report.SetDataSource(stocks); }


1

Consider using any of the SQL money types.... they have serious size / performance advantages if you store a lot of values as they are internally stored as integers. On the .NET side they tranlsate natively into Decimal - which may or may not be good. Sadly the accuracy says less about what you need here as how you use them and that is something you do not ...


1

I THINK this scenario is not supported by ASP.NET Identity as it needs a DbContext which extends IdentityDbContext<ApplicationUser> (or similar). Why are you forcing Identity into your DB-First context? You can use a Code-First context for Identity alongside your other DB-First context without problems...



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