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193

You can do [5, 10].min or [4, 7].max They come from the Enumerable module, so anything that includes Enumerable will have those methods available. EDIT @nicholasklick mentions another option, Enumerable#minmax, but this time returning an array of [min, max]. [4, 7].minmax => [4, 7] It doesn't seem very interesting with only 2 values in the ...


93

You add: using System.Linq; at the top of your source and make sure you've got a reference to the System.Core assembly. Count() is an extension method provided by the System.Linq.Enumerable static class for LINQ to Objects, and System.Linq.Queryable for LINQ to SQL and other out-of-process providers. EDIT: In fact, using Count() here is relatively ...


49

each is different from map and collect, but map and collect are the same (technically map is an alias for collect, but in my experience map is used a lot more frequently). each performs the enclosed block for each element in the (Enumerable) receiver: [1,2,3,4].each {|n| puts n*2} # Outputs: # 2 # 4 # 6 # 8 map and collect produce a new Array containing ...


38

Array#map is a collection of whatever is returned in the blocked for each element. Array#each execute the block of code for each element, then returns the list itself. If you run this for a particular vs vs.each {|v| "#{k}:#{v}"} You'll notice that you'll just get vs back. The string inside the each block gets executed, but has no side effects so it ...


37

There is method Enumerable#reject which serves just the purpose: (1..4).reject{|x| x == 3}.collect{|x| x + 1} The practice of directly using an output of one method as an input of another is called method chaining and is very common in Ruby. BTW, map (or collect) is used for direct mapping of input enumerable to the output one. If you need to output ...


34

This is rather an answer to a denial of the presupposition of your question, and is also to make sure what it is: each_with_object saves your extra key-strokes. Suppose you are to create a hash out of an array. With inject, you need this extra h in the following: array.inject({}).{|h, a| do_something_to_h_using_a; h} # <= extra h here but with ...


26

It's certainly not a bug. It's behaving exactly as documented: true if every element of the source sequence passes the test in the specified predicate, or if the sequence is empty; otherwise, false. Now you can argue about whether or not it should work that way (it seems fine to me; every element of the sequence conforms to the predicate) but the very ...


25

ar = [{"Vegetable"=>10}, {"Vegetable"=>5}, {"Dry Goods"=>3}, {"Dry Goods"=>2}] p ar.inject{|memo, el| memo.merge( el ){|k, old_v, new_v| old_v + new_v}} #=> {"Vegetable"=>15, "Dry Goods"=>5} Hash.merge with a block runs the block when it finds a duplicate; inject without a initial memo treats the first element of the array as memo, ...


25

The Enumerable module of standard Ruby (which is among others included into Array and Hash provides the find method which does exactly what you want to achieve arr = [12, 88, 107, 500] arr.find{ |num| num > 100 } # => 107


23

You don't want to use the IEnumerator<T> from System.pas, trust me. That thing brings along so much trouble because it inherits from IEnumerator and so has that GetCurrent method with different results (TObject for IEnumerator and T for IEnumerator<T>). Better define your own IEnumerator<T>: IEnumerator<T> = interface function ...


19

Wow, after struggling with this for an extremely long time, I realized my problem was a simple one. I was sorting by group.name but some of the group names were uppercase and some were lower, which was throwing it all off. Converting everything to downcase worked well. @memberships.sort_by!{ |m| m.group.name.downcase }


18

The collection used in foreach is immutable. This is very much by design. As it says on MSDN: The foreach statement is used to iterate through the collection to get the information that you want, but can not be used to add or remove items from the source collection to avoid unpredictable side effects. If you need to add or remove items from ...


18

The Developer Fusion VB.Net to C# converter says that the equivalent C# code is: System.Random rnd = new System.Random(); IEnumerable<int> numbers = Enumerable.Range(1, 100).OrderBy(r => rnd.Next()); For future reference, they also have a C# to VB.Net converter. There are several other tools available for this as well.


17

The signature for Enumerable.Range provides a clue: public static IEnumerable<int> Range( int start, int count ) The first parameter is called start; the second is called count. So your second call is returning 33 values starting with 11, which will include 37.


16

java.util.Collections has a list method that copies an Enumeration into a List, which you can then use in a for-each loop (see javadoc).


16

It doesn't override map Hash.new.method(:map).owner # => Enumerable It yields two variables which get collected into an array class Nums include Enumerable def each yield 1 yield 1, 2 yield 3, 4, 5 end end Nums.new.to_a # => [1, [1, 2], [3, 4, 5]]


15

Check out the section on "List Comprehension" here: http://docs.python.org/tutorial/datastructures.html If your starting list is called original_list and your new list is called id_list, you could do something like this: id_list = [x.id for x in original_list]


15

The side effects are the same which is adding some confusion to your reverse engineering. Yes, both iterate over the array (actually, over anything that mixes in Enumerable) but map will return an Array composed of the block results while each will just return the original Array. The return value of each is rarely used in Ruby code but map is one of the ...


14

It's an error in most languages to mutate a collection while you're iterating it. In most languages the solution is to create a copy and mutate that or build up a list of indexes and perform the operations on those indexes when you're done iterating, but Ruby's iterators give you a bit more than that. A couple of solutions are obvious. The most idiomatic ...


13

You're so close. Just remove the returns and you're golden. This is because the block passed to map is a proc (i.e. created with Proc.new), and not a lambda. A return within a proc doesn't just jump out of the proc- it jumps out of the method that executed (i.e. called call on) the proc. A return within a lambda, on the other hand, jumps out of only the ...


13

The best practices for designing public APIs dictate that returning an interface is a better idea than returning a concrete class, because you can then return a different concrete class if you need to. The consumer of the API is not supposed to rely on the returned instance being of a specific type. As you point out, ToList and ToDictionary return concrete ...


12

This would work: new_hash = Hash[array.zip] # => {"foo"=>nil, "bar"=>nil, "baz"=>nil} array.zip returns [["foo"], ["bar"], ["baz"]] Hash::[] creates a Hash from these keys


11

Why should Enumerable.Range be any slower than your self-made GetIntRange? In fact, if Enumerable.Range were defined as public static class Enumerable { public static IEnumerable<int> Range(int start, int count) { var end = start + count; for(var current = start; current < end; ++current) { yield return current; ...


11

In 1.9 (and probably previous versions using backports), you can easily create enumerator: require 'date' def ndays_from(from, step=7) Enumerator.new {|y| loop { y.yield from from += step } } end e = ndays_from(Date.today) p e.take(5) #=> [#<Date: 2010-03-25 (4910561/2,0,2299161)>, #<Date: 2010-04-01 ...


11

The word yield doesn't really have any special meaning in the context of Ruby. It means the same thing as it means in every other programming language, or in programming and computer science in general. It is usually used when some kind of execution context surrenders control flow to a different execution context. For example, in Unix, there is a ...


11

You've setup your GetEnumerator so that it returns the same enumerator instance every time. route.Setup(ro => ro.GetEnumerator()).Returns(rps.GetEnumerator()); This is equivalent to: var enumerator = rps.GetEnumerator() route.Setup(ro => ro.GetEnumerator()).Returns(enumerator); If you want a new enumerator on every call, then you need to pass ...


11

Here is the javadoc from Guava regarding the conversion of an Enumeration to Iterator (not iterable): public static UnmodifiableIterator forEnumeration(Enumeration enumeration) Adapts an Enumeration to the Iterator interface. This method has no equivalent in Iterables because viewing an Enumeration as an Iterable is impossible. However, ...


11

Since Ruby 1.8.7 Enumerable#each_xyz methods return an enumerator when no block is provided (that's very handy, a lot of originally imperative methods can now be used in a functional fashion). So if you want to collect items, simply call collect/map on that enumerator: >> [1, 2, 3].reverse_each.map { |x| 2*x } => [6, 4, 2]


10

The second parameter of Enumerable.Range specifies the number of integers to generate, not the last integer in the range. If necessary, it's easy enough to build your own method, or update your existing Foo.Range method, to generate a range from start and end parameters.


10

Yes, for Enumerable methods (LINQ to Objects, which applies to List<T> you mentioned), you can rely on the order of elements returned by Select, Where, or GroupBy. This is not the case for things that are inherently unordered like ToDictionary or Distinct. From Enumerable.GroupBy documentation: The IGrouping<TKey, TElement> objects are ...



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