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5

Floating point numbers like 0.1 can not be represented precisely. Using floating pointer numbers as step would give you unexpected result like that. A better alternative is: (5 .. 20).map {|e| e / 10.0} #=> [0.5, 0.6, 0.7, 0.8, 0.9, 1.0, 1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 1.4, 1.5, 1.6, 1.7, 1.8, 1.9, 2.0]


3

Use Rational Literals, Then Map to Floats Floating point numbers can bite you. Specifically, binary can't represent 0.1 accurately. Ruby has a number of classes for dealing accurately with arbitrary-precision numbers, including BigDecimal and Rational. You can use the new 2.1 syntax for rational literals to create your series of floats. For example: ...


3

You have return false in the wrong place. As it is, false is returned is there is no combination of one element (i.e., one element other than the one you've removed after sorting) that sums (i.e., is equal to) largest. Rather you want to return false only if no combination of any size sums to largest. This is what you need: def max_match?(arr) ...


3

Enumerators Give You Control Over Iteration Among other things, Enumerators give you control over when you iterate over an object. Sometimes you don't need the iteration to happen now, so you store the Enumerator for later use rather than immediately passing the results to a block. Other times, you may want finer-grained control over the iteration process ...


1

I'm not sure what "send as input to the Portfolio class" means; classes themselves don't accept "input". But if you're just trying to add Investment objects to the @investments instance variable inside an instance of Portfolio, try this: portfolio = Portfolio.new([]) FDParser.investment_data.each do |data| portfolio.investments << ...


1

I would do as @YuHao suggests--clean and easy-to-read--but I would like to point out that you could also use the BigDecimal class: require 'bigdecimal' v = BigDecimal.new(0.5, 1) a = (20-5+1).times.with_object([]) { |_,arr| arr << v.to_f; v += 0.1 } #=> [0.5, 0.6, 0.7, 0.8, 0.9, 1.0, 1.1, 1.2, # 1.3, 1.4, 1.5, 1.6, 1.7, 1.8, 1.9, 2.0] ...


1

Can someone explain in the most basic, laymans terms what a Ruby Enumerable is? It's a module that defines a bunch of methods, and when another class includes that module, those methods are available in that class. So if someone uses a method like each_with_index on an Array, and you say to yourself, "I wonder how that method works. I'll check the ...



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