Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

7

Finally found the real answer: http://tc39wiki.calculist.org/es6/weak-map/ A key property of Weak Maps is the inability to enumerate their keys. This is necessary to prevent attackers observing the internal behavior of other systems in the environment which share weakly-mapped objects. Should the number or names of items in the collection be discoverable ...


7

There isn't an exact equivalent in the .Net framework but there is one in the MoreLINQ library: foreach (var current in MoreEnumerable.Generate(5, n => n + 2).Take(10)) { Console.WriteLine(current); } It's also very simple to recreate it using yield: public static IEnumerable<T> Iterate<T>(T seed, Func<T,T> unaryOperator) { ...


7

The origin of the succ function itself actually has nothing to do with the Haskell data types or enumerations, in fact the succ function came first. The succ function is actually the successor function in the axiom of infinity which allows us to create numbers in the first place. It was never designed to be used with floating point/non-natural numbers, ...


6

Enumerable's implementation of map does use each, but there's nothing stopping an extending class from overriding it with its own implementation that does not use each. In this case Array does provide its own implementation of map for efficiency reasons.


6

list_of_ips.any? {|ip| ip.ip_address == '192.168.1.27'}


6

Enumerable has the count method, which is usually going to be the intuitive "length" of the enumeration. But why not call it "length"? Well, because it operates very differently. In Ruby's built-in data structures like Array and Hash, length simply retrieves the pre-computed size of the data structure. It should always return instantly. For ...


5

Floating point numbers like 0.1 can not be represented precisely. Using floating pointer numbers as step would give you unexpected result like that. A better alternative is: (5 .. 20).map {|e| e / 10.0} #=> [0.5, 0.6, 0.7, 0.8, 0.9, 1.0, 1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 1.4, 1.5, 1.6, 1.7, 1.8, 1.9, 2.0]


5

The reason why you are measuring such a big difference is that the Aggregate call simply returns your initial list since there are no items to aggregate because your list has only one item. If you change it to List<List<int>> foo = new List<List<int>>() { new List<int>(Enumerable.Range(0, 3000 * 1000)), ...


5

Conceptually, Enumerator is a type of collection. Enumerable#inject accumulates a value across the members of a collection, it makes little sense for it to return a Enumerator. You can get the job done by changing numbers.inject(0) &block to: numbers.inject(0, &block)


4

Use join(): 1.9.3-p547 :001 > array = ["A", "P", "P", "L", "E"] => ["A", "P", "P", "L", "E"] 1.9.3-p547 :002 > array.join() => "APPLE" Or use it without parenthesis (kudos to Anthony's comment): 1.9.3-p547 :003 > array.join => "APPLE"


4

In addition to the provided answers, if you want to convert Enumerable#max into a max method that can call a variable number or arguments, like in some other programming languages, you could write: def max(*values) values.max end Output: max(7, 1234, 9, -78, 156) => 1234 This abuses the properties of the splat operator to create an array object ...


4

You are not actually using a lazy enumerator. To convert a normal enumerator to a lazy one, use the Enumerable#lazy method. To get the results back I'd recommend using the method Enumerable::Lazy#force instead of to_a because I think it shows the intention more clearly. (1..Float::INFINITY).lazy.flat_map { |s| [s,s] }.take(4).force #=> [1, 1, 2, 2]


4

From the documentation for Enumerable: The Enumerable mixin provides collection classes with several traversal and searching methods, and with the ability to sort. The class must provide a method each, which yields successive members of the collection. So the Enumerable module requires that classes which include it implement each on their own. All the ...


4

Use Where:- var result = numbers.Where((v, i) => i != MasterIndex).ToList(); Working Fiddle.


4

Due to precedence of |> operator your code is interpreted as: for cada <- s, fila <-[1,2,3], col <- [1,2,3], do: ( {cada, fila, col} |>Enum.map(&({&1,2})) |>Enum.into(HashDict.new) ) To resolve it, you can either put for comprehension in parentheses: (for cada <- s, fila <-[1,2,3], col <- [1,2,3], do: {cada, ...


4

Yes, this bookkeeping with i is usually a sign there should be something better. I came up with: ar =[ { name: "foo1", location: "new york" }, { name: "foo2", location: "new york" }, { name: "foo3", location: "new york" }, { name: "bar1", location: "new york" }, { name: "bar2", location: "new york" }, { name: "bar3", location: "new ...


3

Enumerators Give You Control Over Iteration Among other things, Enumerators give you control over when you iterate over an object. Sometimes you don't need the iteration to happen now, so you store the Enumerator for later use rather than immediately passing the results to a block. Other times, you may want finer-grained control over the iteration process ...


3

Use Rational Literals, Then Map to Floats Floating point numbers can bite you. Specifically, binary can't represent 0.1 accurately. Ruby has a number of classes for dealing accurately with arbitrary-precision numbers, including BigDecimal and Rational. You can use the new 2.1 syntax for rational literals to create your series of floats. For example: ...


3

You have return false in the wrong place. As it is, false is returned is there is no combination of one element (i.e., one element other than the one you've removed after sorting) that sums (i.e., is equal to) largest. Rather you want to return false only if no combination of any size sums to largest. This is what you need: def max_match?(arr) ...


3

Here is a way : hash = [{ id: 5, count: 10 }, { id: 6, count: -3 }, { id: 5, count: -2 }, { id: 3, count: 4}] merged_hash = hash.group_by { |h| h[:id] }.map do |_,v| v.reduce do |h1,h2| h1.merge(h2) { |k,o,n| k == :count ? o + n : o } end end merged_hash # => [{:id=>5, :count=>8}, {:id=>6, :count=>-3}, {:id=>3, :count=>4}] ...


3

size, length and all the methods that mutate the collection in place, like select!, are not part of Enumerable. If you want them you must implement them yourself.


3

As far as I can tell, you should get the exact same error with both your Enumerable version and your Array/Hash monkey patch. I do. Are you sure you're using the same deephash in both cases? Normally when you loop each on a hash, you'd pass in both key and value to the block. You're passing a single value element to the block. This then is an Array with the ...


3

3.times is invoked and the result of that call (instead of a callable function) gets passed to iter function. And if times gets invoked without a block, it returns iterator. Iterator itself doesn't take a block, but you can invoke each on it.


3

You could use a recursive lambda: add_five = lambda { |e| e.is_a?(Enumerable) ? e.map(&add_five) : e + 5 } new_array = array.map(&add_five) Adjust the e.is_a?(Enumerable) test to match your situation, e.is_a?(Array) would be tighter but possibly unnecessarily so.


3

a.each_slice(group_size).to_a.transpose Will work given that your data is accurately portrayed in the example. If it is not please supply accurate data so that we can answer the question more appropriately. e.g. a= [ { name: "foo1", location: "new york" }, { name: "foo2", location: "new york" }, { name: "foo3", location: "new york" }, { ...


2

Hash.new{|h, k| h[k] = Hash.new{|h, k| h[k] = 0}} .tap{|h| data.each{|e| h[e.action][e.date] += 1}} result h is: { "action1" => {"1/8/2014" => 3, "8/8/2014" => 1}, "action2" => {"1/8/2014" => 1, "2/8/2014" => 2} } or, data.each_with_object(Hash.new{|h, k| h[k] = Hash.new{|h, k| h[k] = 0}}) do |e, h| h[e.action][e.date] += 1 end ...


2

You can use the following class to create a comparer that can compare sequences of items based on the values in those sequences, rather than based on the reference to the sequence: public class SequenceComparer<T> : IEqualityComparer<IEnumerable<T>> { private IEqualityComparer<T> comparer; public ...


2

Based on your debug snapshot, it looks like both of your measurements are less than the critical level of 598.0, so I would expect the count to match the queue length. Both data points are <= Me.CriticalLowLevel. Can you share an example where one of the data points is > Me.CriticalLowLevel that still exhibits this behavior?


2

map basically iterates over the elements of the object: foo = [ ['a', 'b'], ['c', 'd'] ] foo.map{ |ary| puts ary.join(',') } # >> a,b # >> c,d In this example it's passing each sub-array, which is assigned to ary. Looking at it a bit differently: foo.map{ |ary| puts "ary is a #{ary.class}" } # >> ary is a Array # >> ary is a ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible