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16

The generic method ToDictionary has 3 parameters. You left one off, so it doesn't know what to do. If you want to specify all of the parameters, it would be <DataRow, string, object>. internal Dictionary<string,object> GetDict(DataTable dt) { return dt.AsEnumerable() .ToDictionary<DataRow, string, object>(row => ...


9

In a single iteration over initial array: arry.inject(Hash.new([])) { |h, a| h[a[:type]] += [a[:name]]; h }


6

Your next statement must occur inside a loop. There's no loop inside your increment method. Exceptions will 'bubble up', so if there's an exception in your increment method, it will be caught by the rescue section of the calling method.


6

Split string by chars, then group chunks by char, then count chars in chunks: def word str str .chars .chunk{ |e| e } .map{|(e,ar)| [e, ar.length] } end p word "aaabbcbbaaa" p word("aaaaaaaaaa") p word "" Result: [["a", 3], ["b", 2], ["c", 1], ["b", 2], ["a", 3]] [["a", 10]] []


6

Enumerable's implementation of map does use each, but there's nothing stopping an extending class from overriding it with its own implementation that does not use each. In this case Array does provide its own implementation of map for efficiency reasons.


5

Your code is fundamentally broken. You're just returning a reference to the same array every time, which means that unless the caller uses the data within each item immediately, it effectively gets lost. For example, suppose I use: List<object[]> rows = BindExtraColumns(data, size, toAdd).ToList(); Then when I iterate over the rows, I find the same ...


5

You seem to be looking for a Batch method. Here is one implementation: public static IEnumerable<IEnumerable<T>> Batch<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source, int batchSize) { List<T> buffer = new List<T>(batchSize); foreach (T item in source) { buffer.Add(item); if (buffer.Count >= batchSize) ...


5

Calling a method without an explicit receiver calls the method on self so even though "it shows without self" the self is implicitly present as the default receiver. That method is more or less the same as: def concurrently self.map{|item| Thread.new{ yield item }}.each{|t| t.join} #^^^^^ This is implicit. end


5

p [1, 2, 3].to_enum p [1, 2, 3].enum_for --output:-- #<Enumerator: [1, 2, 3]:each> #<Enumerator: [1, 2, 3]:each> From the docs: to_enum Creates a new Enumerator which will enumerate by calling method on obj, passing args if any. ... enum_for Creates a new Enumerator which will enumerate by calling method on obj, ...


5

Yes, Enumerable#group_by preserves input order. Here's the implementation of that method in MRI, from https://github.com/ruby/ruby/blob/trunk/enum.c: static VALUE enum_group_by(VALUE obj) { VALUE hash; RETURN_SIZED_ENUMERATOR(obj, 0, 0, enum_size); hash = rb_hash_new(); rb_block_call(obj, id_each, 0, 0, group_by_i, hash); ...


5

You can modify your class to accommodate a tree like hierarchy. public class Node { public string Text { get; set; } public string Value { get; set; } public string Title { get; set; } public Node Parent { get; private set; } public ICollection<Node> Children { get; private set; } public IEnumerable<Node> Ancestors() { ...


4

Let's start with a simpler example: [4, 1, 2, 0].count{|elem| elem == 4} => 1 So here the count method returns 1 since the block returns true for one element of the array (the first one). Now let's look at your code. First, Ruby creates an enumerator object when we call to_enum: [4, 1, 2, 0].to_enum(:count) => #<Enumerator: [4, 1, 2, ...


4

array.group_by{|h| h[:type]}.each{|_, v| v.replace(v.map{|h| h[:name]})} # => {"Meat"=>["one", "two"], "Fruit"=>["four"]} Following steenslag's suggestion: array.group_by{|h| h[:type]}.each{|_, v| v.map!{|h| h[:name]}} # => {"Meat"=>["one", "two"], "Fruit"=>["four"]}


4

First extract the head and tail of the list (header and rows, respectively) using a splat, then zip them together: header, *rows = roster header.zip(*rows) This is the same as using transpose on the original roster: header, *rows = roster zipped = header.zip(*rows) roster.transpose == zipped #=> true


4

You can also reject the nil value [{val: 1},{val: nil}].reject { |v| v[:val].nil? }.min_by { |v| v[:val] } Reject will return a new array, delete_if will only delete the value from the matching block - both is possible. But I think delete_if is more performant for your case.


4

You can write a Batch method to transform a sequence of items into a sequence of batches of a given size, which can be done without needing to iterate the source sequence multiple times, and which can limit the memory footprint to only holding the size of one batch in memory at once: public static IEnumerable<IEnumerable<T>> Batch<T>( ...


4

I would say it is because not all enumerable objects have the last element. The simplest example would be: [1].cycle Even if the enumerator elements are finite, there is no easy way to get the last element other than iterating through it to the end, which would be extremely inefficient.


4

Use MaxBy from moreLINQ library: public static TSource MaxBy<TSource, TKey>(this IEnumerable<TSource> source, Func<TSource, TKey> selector) { return source.MaxBy(selector, Comparer<TKey>.Default); } public static TSource MaxBy<TSource, TKey>(this IEnumerable<TSource> source, Func<TSource, TKey> ...


4

so what happens when you leave them out? Then in the first pass, x, y will be set to the first 2 values from your collection. From the next pass onwards, x will be set to the value returned by the block, and y by the next element from the collection. In your case in first pass x and y is set to as 2 and 4 respectively. From the next pass onwards, x is ...


4

def unique_group_of_three(array) multiple = array.size / 3 return "Your collection is too small" if multiple < 5 multiples = [multiple, multiple *2] array = array.shuffle { :first => array[0...multiple].uniq, :second => array[multiple...multiples[1]].uniq, :third => array[multiples[1]..-1]].uniq ...


4

More specifically, Enumerable calls each so it depends on how each is implemented and whether each yields the elements in the original order: class ReverseArray < Array def each(&block) reverse_each(&block) end end array = ReverseArray.new([1,2,3,4]) #=> [1, 2, 3, 4] array.group_by { |i| i % 2 } #=> {0=>[4, 2], 1=>[3, 1]}


3

You don't need in-place mutations (merge!). I'd do something like this: hash = { 'a' => 1, 'b' => 2 } hash2 = Hash[hash.map{|k, v| [k + '_new', v] }] hash2 # => {"a_new"=>1, "b_new"=>2}


3

Yes, possible this way, but not good for performance (see post: Is the &method(:method_name) idiom bad for perfomance in Ruby?): targets = ['./foo', './bar', './free'] targets.map(&Dir.method(:exists?)) # => [false, false, false] #all are false,as I don't have such directories.


3

Exceptions kill performance. You could loop obviously if you want, but it be much faster if ou build a dictionary from this collection with the key being the name and value being the form. then simply search the dictionary for the key and that would be hell lot faster and no exceptions


3

Don't throw exceptions on purpose. They should not be used for normal control flow.


3

You can simply return children.GetEnumerator() in this case. (By the way your GroupNode object should implement IEnumerable and your GetEnumerator method should have the correct return type.) public IEnumerator<ISceneNode> GetEnumerator() { return children.GetEnumerator() } In more general cases though you can iterate over something and call ...


3

I think this is all you need: def check_ages?(data, sex, older_than) raise ArgumentError, "'sex' must equal ':m' or ':f'" unless [:m, :f].include? sex data.all? {|h| h[:sex] != sex || h[:age] > older_than} end


3

Enumerable.Range(1, n) .Select(i => String.Join(" ", Enumerable.Range(1, i))) .ToList(); For n = 3 produces: [ "1", "1 2", "1 2 3" ]


3

Use the Enumerator#rewind method from Ruby core class libarary. Rewinds the enumeration sequence to the beginning.If the enclosed object responds to a “rewind” method, it is called. a = [1,2,3,4] enum= a.each enum # => #<Enumerator: [1, 2, 3, 4]:each> enum.next # => 1 enum.next # => 2 enum.rewind # => #<Enumerator: [1, 2, 3, ...


3

Use Enumerable#find_index as below : h = { 1 => "a", 2 => "b", 3 => "c" } h.find_index([2,'b']) # => 1



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