New answers tagged

1

Java as EnumMap class that you can you.example shown below. import java.util.EnumMap; public class Program { enum Importance { Low, Medium, High, Critical } public static void main(String[] args) { // Create an EnumMap. EnumMap<Importance, String> e = new EnumMap<>(Importance.class); e.put(Importance.Low, "=Low"); ...


0

Maybe you can use KVC and do : NSArray<NSMutableDictionary *> *result = [[_myArray filteredArrayUsingPredicate:[NSPredicate withFormat:@"{YOUR CONDITION}"]] valueForKey:@"mutableCopy"];


0

On top of the String(…) (CustomStringConvertible) support for enums in Swift 2.2, there's also somewhat broken reflection support for them. For enum cases with associated values it is possible to get the label of the enum case using reflection: enum City { case Melbourne(String) case Chelyabinsk case Bursa var label:String? { let ...


-1

I came across the same issue while migrating existing objC code to swift. What I had to do to fix it was to import the class which contains enums (in my case `Constants.h ) to bridging header. Hope it helps someone.


0

I solved it like this: enum Barcode { case UPCA(Int, Int, Int)// = "Order 1" case QRCode(String)// = "Order 2" static func customRawValue(rawValue: String) -> Barcode? { switch rawValue { case "Order 1": return Barcode.UPCA(0, 0, 0) case "Order 2": return Barcode.QRCode("") default: return nil } } ...


1

You could use the Pragmatic Tokenizer gem. It can detect English contractions. s = "don't frazzel the horses. 'she said wow'." PragmaticTokenizer::Tokenizer.new(punctuation: :none).tokenize(s) => ["don't", "frazzel", "the", "horses", "she", "said", "wow"] s = "'Twas the 'night before Christmas'." PragmaticTokenizer::Tokenizer.new(punctuation: ...


-1

namespace enum_operator { template<typename E> E& operator++(E& e) { e = static_cast< E >(static_cast< int >( e ) + 1); return e; } }; namespace { enum colors { white, red, green, blue }; enum corners { topleft, topright, ...


0

Usually the apostrophe will stay with the contraction after tokenzation. Try a normal NLP tokenizer, e.g. in python nltk: >>> from nltk import word_tokenize >>> word_tokenize("don't frazzel the horses") ['do', "n't", 'frazzel', 'the', 'horses'] For multiple sentences: >>> from string import punctuation >>> from nltk ...


1

As I mentioned in a comment, I think trying to list all possible contraction endings is fruitless. In fact, some contractions, such as "couldn’t’ve", contain more than one apostrophe. The other option is to match single quotes. My first thought was to remove the character "'" if is at the start of the sentence or after a space, or if it is followed by a ...


1

How about this? irb:0> s = "don't frazzel the horses. 'she said wow'." irb:0> contractionEndings = ["d", "l", "ll", "m", "re", "s", "t", "ve"] irb:0> s.scan(/\w+(?:'(?:#{contractionEndings.join('|')}))?/) => ["don't", "frazzel", "the", "horses", "she", "said", "wow"] The regex scans for some "word" characters, and then optionally (with the ?) ...


1

I made a library based on Brian Cline's answer, it is named greg0ire/enum, and integrates into symfony2 with greg0ire/enum-bundle. Enjoy!


0

Don't use operator ++! What are you supposed to do if you have an enum like this?: enum class other_enum : int { low = -3000, fabada_asturiana = 0xfabada, answer_to_life_universe_everything = 0b101010, high = -low }; As you can see, the values are not reachable increasing by one the previous one and don't even have a pattern; use iterators ...


3

Converting it to a list will iterate the enumerable once and copy all the references (or even values for value types) into a new List<>. Then, you would iterate over the list. That means you would iterate twice. Using the IEnumerable<> as a source for enumeration iterates over the sequence only once. Why someone decided to do the iteration ...


2

Converting to a List<T> would require additional memory and CPU cycles to perform the conversion not to mention you'd be iterating over the data twice. There's no need to convert to a List<T> before iterating. foreach can iterate over anything that implements IEnumerable<T>.


0

This is the correct way to do this. private enum StartupMode PREVIEWCREATE = -3 SETUP = -2 PREVIEW = -1 end enum t.StartupModeId = [Enum].Parse(GetType(StartupMode), mode_custom_mode)


4

Building on 101010's and wowofbob's answers : template <class E, class = std::enable_if_t<std::is_enum<E>{}>> E &operator ++ (E &e) { return e = static_cast<E>( static_cast<std::underlying_type_t<E>>(e) + 1 ); } I've SFINAE'd away the operator for everything that is not an enum, and added proper ...


2

You can't inherit a class from an enum or enum class. In my humble opinion the best you can do is define your template overloaded operator as a free function and put it and all of the enums that you want to work with it in namespace (e.g., fancy) and let name lookup do the rest: namespace fancy { enum colors { white, red, green, blue }; enum corners { ...


0

You don't really need a classes here. This works fine: #include <assert.h> enum colors { white, red, green, blue }; enum corners { topleft, topright, bottomleft, bottomright }; template<class Enum> Enum next(Enum e) { // To cast back to Enum from `int` return static_cast<Enum>(e + 1); } int ...


0

In .NET 4.0, the WorkflowApplication.Idle event contains WorkflowApplicationIdleEventArgs, which contains a Bookmarks property.


1

If something's not very neat refactor out a method so it looks neat again (especially if it happens in more than one place): if (user.isRole(RoleEnum.ADMIN)) on User (I'm assuming the name of the type of user): public boolean isRole(RoleEnum role) { return getObjId.equals(role.getValue()); } Or if it's not not possible to modify User or reference ...


1

The answer to your question is simply 'No'. It all depends on the equals method of the objectId. You can not override the equals method of the enum, but you could possibly override/declare the equals method on the objectId (it's hard to say from the information you provided). The implementation of the equals method can then check for the type of the ...


1

the idea behind BigInteger is that you can work with numbers that are so big you can just type in a numeric way on the IDE... you should do: ADMIN("1"), USER("2"); private RoleEnum(String value) { this.value = BigInteger.valueOf(value);


6

No. It is perfectly valid for VkMemoryHeap::flags to be 0. A particular flag is either present or absent; it's not an enumeration where the value can attain one of a small number of different possibilities. Usually, flags are independent of one another. That's how bitflags work; they represent boolean conditions. A particular flag is either present or ...


1

@Trevor.Screws answer is correct in some cases, but what if you want to do some checks depending on the current index's item and then make you modifications ? Let's take this case: for (int i = myList.Count - 1; i >= 0; i--) { if (myList[i] > 5) { myList.RemoveAt(i); } } After the first remove you get an error of type: index is ...


1

Not the shortest solution in terms of lines of code, but If it is known that no more than single element can be inserter or removed at a time (but more than single change in whole list) you can use the following loop: var i = 0; var j = 0; while(i < oldList.Count || j < newList.Count) { if (i >= oldList.Count) { for(; j < ...


1

You can use Except() extension, for example: List<Model> models = new List<Model>(); List<View> views = new List<View>(); Then you can get the desired added/removed item doing this: //If models.Count > views.Count var addedModel = models.Except(views.Select(v => v.Model)).FirstOrDefault(); //If views.Count > models.Count ...


0

It is quite easy if you add an action state {None, Added, Updated, Deleted} to your View item like this View { ActionState State{get;set;} } and then you can query from your input list like this var changedElement= views.FirstOrDefault(x=> x.State != ActionState.None); Next, depending on the action you can add/update/remove the respective view ...


0

Here is the source of your problem: positions.append(i) This is appending the index from the enumerate function, which is appending the original location of each unique word, hence the ever increasing number. What you wanted to do, is append in increments of one for each new term. This can be accomplished by changing that line to the following: ...


3

For 1. and 3. See chi's suggestion. For 2. I'd suggest you avoid manually adding counters in recursive functions. It's generally more idiomatic in Haskell to use standard higher-order functions. For instance, countColor just gives you the length of the sublist fulfilling a predicate. Hence, I would implement it as countColor c = length . filter (==c) ...


3

1) If we define data Color = Red | Green | Blue | Yellow | Orange | Purple deriving (Eq, Show, Enum, Bounded, Ord) then we can use > [minBound .. maxBound] :: [Color] [Red,Green,Blue,Yellow,Orange,Purple] 2) To convert a boolean into an integer, we can use > fromEnum True 1 > fromEnum False 0 3) For the histogram, we can start by ...


1

Use bit shifting: [Flags] public enum MyEnum { None = 0, First = 1 << 0, Second = 1 << 1, Third = 1 << 2, Fourth = 1 << 3 } EDIT: after clarification of the problem, this is how you'd go about evaluating if a flagged key enum value contains the equivalent value of a differently-typed, but similarly-named ...


4

Yes: use the third output of unique with the 'stable' input flag: [~, ~, result] = unique(x, 'stable');


-2

I updated your code and it seems to work for me. Can you check to see if this meets your expectations? import Data.List data Tree = Node Tree Tree | Leaf Int deriving (Show) toTree :: [Int] -> Tree toTree [] = Leaf 0 toTree [n] = Leaf n toTree ns = Node leftTree rightTree where midIndex = (length ns) `div` 2 leftTree = toTree $ take ...


1

Name your sprites A01-A20 and try A[0-2][1-9] Edit: It appears that the search argument is actually a regex. From the declaration of the function: name An Xpath style path that can include simple regular expressions for matching node names. So ^A[0-9]{1,2}$ will match 'A' followed by one or 2 digits as the complete node name.


157

You found a code generation bug in the .NET 4 x86 jitter. It is a very unusual one, it only fails when the code is not optimized. The machine code looks like this: State a = s[0, 0]; 013F04A9 push 0 ; index 2 = 0 013F04AB mov ecx,dword ptr [ebp-40h] ; s[] reference 013F04AE xor edx,edx ...


8

Let's consider OP's declaration: enum State : sbyte { OK = 0, BUG = -1 } Since the bug only occurs when BUG is negative (from -128 to -1) and State is an enum of signed byte I started to suppose that there were a cast issue somewhere. If you run this: Console.WriteLine((sbyte)s[0, 0]); Console.WriteLine((sbyte)State.BUG); Console.WriteLine(s[0, 0]); ...


0

I have the same problem in one specific application. The root cause in that hibernate is ignoring the @Enumerated annotion and always passing to the sql the enum as VARBINARY


0

There is a very comprehensive explanation of how to do this using shapeless at http://www.cakesolutions.net/teamblogs/copying-sealed-trait-instances-a-journey-through-generic-programming-and-shapeless ; in case the link breaks, the approach uses the copySyntax utilities from shapeless, which should be sufficient to find more details.


2

User.roles is just an ActiveSupport::HashWithIndifferentAccess that looks like: { 'member' => 0, 'content_creator' => 1, 'moderator' => 2, 'admin' => 3 } Using that, this solution is pretty close to yours but without the exception handling. I would also be doing this as an instance method on User, not a class method. Returns the ...


0

How's this grab you? Okay so it's not really more "built in." But I thought it was different enough from your solution (which was pretty clever imo) to throw into the mix, at least to offer some different elements to potentially incorporate. def self.next_role(user) next_role = user.role.to_i + 1 next_role == self.roles.length ? nil : ...



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