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373

Try type-safe-enum pattern. public sealed class AuthenticationMethod { private readonly String name; private readonly int value; public static readonly AuthenticationMethod FORMS = new AuthenticationMethod (1, "FORMS"); public static readonly AuthenticationMethod WINDOWSAUTHENTICATION = new AuthenticationMethod (2, "WINDOWS"); public ...


124

Use method Enum.GetName(Type MyEnumType, object enumvariable) as in (Assume Shipper is a defined Enum) Shipper x = Shipper.FederalExpress; string s = Enum.GetName(typeof(Shipper), x); There are a bunch of other static methods on the Enum class worth investigating too...


65

Here are 3 ways to do it specifically with a FormCollection object. public ActionResult SomeActionMethod(FormCollection formCollection) { foreach (var key in formCollection.AllKeys) { var value = formCollection[key]; } foreach (var key in formCollection.Keys) { var value = formCollection[key.ToString()]; } // Using the ValueProvider ...


36

Unfortunately reflection to get attributes on enums is quite slow: See this question: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/17772 The .ToString() is quite slow on enums too. You can write extension methods for enums though: public static string GetName( this MyEnum input ) { switch ( input ) { case MyEnum.WINDOWSAUTHENTICATION: ...


32

From what I've read, a design decision was made for certain Collections's Enumerator Types to be mutable structs instead of reference types for performance reasons. Good question. First off, you are correct. Though in general, mutable value types are a bad code smell, in this case they are justified: The mutation is almost entirely concealed from ...


23

I use an extension method: public static class AttributesHelperExtension { public static string ToDescription(this Enum value) { var da = (DescriptionAttribute[])(value.GetType().GetField(value.ToString())).GetCustomAttributes(typeof(DescriptionAttribute), false); return da.Length > 0 ? da[0].Description : ...


20

There is no ++ operator in Ruby. It's also convention to use do and end for multi-line blocks. Modifying your solution yields: c = 0 items.each do |i| puts i.to_s break if c > 9 c += 1 end Or also: items.each_with_index do |i, c| puts i.to_s break if c > 9 end See each_with_index and also Programming Ruby Break, Redo, ...


20

I use the Description attribute from the System.ComponentModel namespace. Simply decorate the enum and then use this code to retrieve it: public static string GetDescription<T>(this object enumerationValue) where T : struct { Type type = enumerationValue.GetType(); if (!type.IsEnum) { ...


20

You've got a non-obvious pseudo-bug in your initial code - IEnumerator<T> extends IDisposable so you should dispose it. This can be very important with iterator blocks! Not a problem for arrays, but would be with other IEnumerable<T> implementations. I'd do it like this: public static IEnumerable<TResult> ...


18

There are at least three iteratee libraries: enumerator iteratee iterIO I believe that the enumerator library is the preferred one currently, because of its simplicity. It's also the one I use for my projects, if you care. The other two packages are more flexible and can be faster at times, but they are also more complicated. If you want to learn ...


17

Since you can guarantee they're all TestClass instances, use the LINQ Cast<T> method: public static List<TestClass> ConvertToGenericClass(NonGenericCollection collection) { return collection.Cast<TestClass>().ToList(); } Edit: And if you just wanted the TestClass instances of a (possibly) heterogeneous collection, filter it with ...


16

if there are the same number of column names as there are elements in each row, could you not use a for loop? var currentValues = currentRow.Split(separatorChar); for(var i=0;i<columnList.Length;i++){ // use i to index both (or all) arrays and build your map }


13

It would be entirely possible to implement this. Personally, I almost never reverse-iterate. If I need to do this, I call .Reverse() first. Probably this is what the .NET BCL designers thought as well. All features are unimplemented by default. They need to be designed, implemented, tested, documented and supported. - Raymond Chen And this is why you ...


12

An Enumerator object provides some methods common to enumerations -- next, each, each_with_index, rewind, etc. You're getting the Enumerator object here because gsub is extremely flexible: gsub(pattern, replacement) → new_str gsub(pattern, hash) → new_str gsub(pattern) {|match| block } → new_str gsub(pattern) → enumerator In the first three cases, the ...


11

Your approach is pretty good but I think you are overthinking the problem somewhat. Let's take a step back. You have a recursive algorithm: void MoveTowerConsole (int n, Needle start, Needle finish, Needle temp) { if (n > 0) { MoveTowerConsole (n - 1, start, temp, finish); Console.WriteLine ("Moving disk from {0} to {1}", start, ...


10

Let's say that you execute the following SQL in an Execute SQL Task (using an ADO.NET connection) and you store the full result set in an SSIS Object variable. select * from (select 1 as id, 'test' as description) resultSet1 ; select * from (select 2 as anotherId, 'test2' as description union select 3 as anotherId, 'test3' as description) resultSet2 That ...


9

OK, So, assuming that you have an actual enumerator (IEnumerator<byte>), you can use a while loop: var list = new List<byte>(); while(enumerator.MoveNext()) list.Add(enumerator.Current); var array = list.ToArray(); In reality, I'd prefer to turn the IEnumerator<T> to an IEnumerable<T>: public static class EnumeratorExtensions { ...


9

I'll expand upon @pst's comment: why isn't this working ? arr.each { |v| v = "bad" } Because each iterates through the array and puts each item into the block you've given as a local variable v, as v is not a reference to the array arr. new_arr = arr.each { |v| v = "bad" } each does not give back an array, for that you would use map (see ...


8

Just for the sake of fun, a solution to the general problem that doesn't require eager evaluation and has a single local variable (except the enumerator): static class TaggedEnumerableExtensions { public class TaggedItem<T> { public TaggedItem(T value, bool isFirst, bool isLast) { IsFirst = isFirst; ...


8

I use a combination of several of the suggestions above, combined with some caching. Now, I got the idea from some code that I found somewhere on the net, but I can neither remember where I got it or find it. So if anyone ever finds something that looks similar please comment with the attribution. Anyway, the usage involves the type converters, so if you ...


8

See DeHL ( http://code.google.com/p/delphilhlplib/ ). You can write code that looks like this: for E in List.Where(...).Distinct.Reversed.Take(10).Select(...)... etc. Just like you can do in .NET (no syntax linq of course).


8

The reason why you're seeing this behavior is that List(Of T).Enumerator is a Struct and not a Class as is commonly expected. So when you pass the enumerator you pass a copy of it and hence only that copy gets updated when you call MoveNext


8

Reverse returns the reversed sequence. It doesn't modify the original. Try something like this, to construct a new Queue out of the reversed items: currentPath = new Queue<T>(currentPath.Reverse()); When the documentation talks about calling GetEnumerator, it means on the IEnumerable that was returned by Reverse(): IEnumerable reversed = ...


8

Each time foreach is called, it asks for a new IEnumerator. Returning your class instance is a bad idea - you should make a separate class to implement the IEnumerator, and return it instead. This is often done by using a nested (private) class, and returning an instance of it. You can pass the class A instance to the private class (giving it access to ...


7

So long as you document very clearly that the method will never finish iterating (the method itself returns very quickly, of course) then I think it's fine. Indeed, it can make some algorithms much neater. I don't believe there are any significant memory/perf implications - although if you refer to an "expensive" object within your iterator, that reference ...


7

Assuming you have an IEnumerable<T>, you can use the Enumerable.ToArray extension method: IEnumerable<byte> udpDnsPacket = /*...*/; byte[] result = udpDnsPacket.ToArray();


7

You probably can't give go a type signature as-is. The reason for this is that it makes use of polymorphic arguments bound by test. This means that, inside go, the identifier f has type (ao -> ai) for some specific, but unknown types ao and ai. Type variables are generally only in scope for the single type signature where they're introduced, so when you ...


7

GetEnumerator doesn't return an IEnumerable, it returns the enumerator itself. So remove that part and return logHeaders. Here's what I might write: public IEnumerable<string> LogHeaders { get { return logHeaders ?? Enumerable.Empty<string>(); } }


7

It's complaining because GetEnumerator() returns IEnumerator<T> for the IEnumerable<T> interface. To satisfy, your type must return IEnumerator<T> (and an explicit one for IEnumerator as well). But, many times it's desirable for a class to return a more specific type than the interface specifies, but interfaces don't allow for covariant ...


7

If you want an Array, call #to_a. The difference between Enumerable and Array is that one is lazy and the other eager. It's the good old memory (lazy) vs. cpu (eager) optimization. Apparently they chose lazy, also because str = "foobar" chrs = str.chars chrs.to_a # => ["f", "o", "o", "b", "a", "r"] str.sub!('r', 'z') chrs.to_a # => ["f", "o", "o", ...



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