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31

When the function is called, the stack looks like: +-------------+ | Parameter 2 | +-------------+ | Parameter 1 | +-------------+ | Return Addr | <-- esp +-------------+ then after the "stack frame" is set up: +-------------+ | Parameter 2 | <-- [ebp + 12] +-------------+ | Parameter 1 | <-- [ebp + 8] +-------------+ | Return Addr | ...


12

Forgive me for stating the bleeding obvious here, but... I've seen this sort of thing happen many times before when object (.o) and header (.h) files get out of sync. Especially with respect to virtual methods. Consider: The object file is compiled with header: class Foo { virtual void f(); }; But then the header gets changed to: class Foo { virtual ...


10

Because your newly allocated stack is not DWORD aligned. Change code to this: push 0x00100000 call malloc pop ecx push eax add eax, 0x000f0000 ... and it will print as needed. Be sure to add \n to avoid buffering issues as advised by Paul.


6

This is most probably due to incompatible calling conventions, where the library and the caller have different ideas about stack layout. Take a look at MSDN for more info.


5

Because there are two other items on the stack; the previous ebp, which you push at the beginning of this routine, and the return address, which is put on the stack by the call to the routine.


5

This is related to the implementation of NX emulation in the 32-bit non-PAE Ubuntu kernels, and when the CPU exception is raised. For memory regions below the NX emulation line (i.e. "within" the emulated NX area: from address 0 to the end of the program's text segment -- less than the 0x08049000 end-address of this binary in /proc/$pid/maps), the segfault ...


5

You have three questions in your question : How to see outgoing ESP packets in tcpdump before they get encrypted ? How it works actually in the linux kernel ? Is there a way to see the packets on sender side in tcpdump before they get encrypted ? The answer to the third question is It depends on your kernel and which implementation you are using. If ...


5

4(%esp) is equivalent to [esp + 4], so assuming your first argument is 4 bytes, your second argument should be at 8(%esp)


4

I run into a similar problem once when I was compiling one project against old header file that differed from the latest by one missing virtual function.


4

This is either due to a bug in FileCompare() or mismatched calling conventions between the declaration and implementation of myFunction() and/or FileCompare(). You might be able to fix the problem with an appropriate specifier (like maybe __cdecl) on the prototype for FileCompare(). Or you might need to create an assembly language wrapper for the ...


4

You don't have to assign CScorezone* to void* and then cast it to IPhysicsObject*. Since CScorezone is-a IPhysicsObject you can simply assign to base pointer: IPhysicsObject *scoreZone = new CScorezone(); IPhysicsObject *otherZone = new CScorezone(); You're also missing public virtual destructor in IPhysicsObject declaration. Edit: I a callback ...


4

http://www.linuxjournal.com/article/9916 This is by far the best break down of a VPN setup with either. You should be able to deduce what you need for this article. Good luck!


4

From the article linked by shdobxr, the most relevant part regarding the difference between KLIPS and Netkey seems to be the following: When you apply firewall (iptables) rules, KLIPS is the easier case, because with KLIPS, you can identify IPsec traffic, as this traffic goes through ipsecX interfaces. You apply iptables rules to these interfaces ...


3

memset_return: mov esi, eax ; Restore ESI add esp, 4 ; Clean up the stack ret That's wrong, you didn't subtract 4 from ESP in the function body. You'll actually skip the return address and RET pops the argument from the stack and jumps to its value. Kaboom. Fix: memset_return: ...


3

If you want to see what each individual instruction is doing, you need to disable source-level debugging. Open the debug menu and uncheck "Source Mode". When you step in source mode, all instructions mapped to the current source line are executed before the debugger breaks.


3

That's because PUSH pushes one whole register to the stack. On 32bit machines, that's four byte's worth of data. PUSHQ would change RSP by 8 in x86_64 because it pushes 64 bits.


3

The problem is that you cast the pointer to void* first. The compiler doesn't know then how to perform static cast for the pointer. It needs to change the pointer value during the cast if you use multiple inheritance to use second superclass virtual table. Just cast the pointer back to CScoreZone* before using static_cast.


3

The RuleCore CEP Server might solve your problems if I remember correctly. It does not lose state if you restart it and it contains a virtual logical clock so that you can replay events using any notion of time.


3

Make sure that you haven't selected in your project an old version of a library, I.e. (as Adam mentioned) you have selected an older debug version instead of a current release version or vica versa. You might need to rebuild. Also watch out for conditional compilation where a macro might get #defined or #undef'd at some point (The other solution may have ...


3

POP just moves data to a register and adjusts the stack pointer. It doesn't erase the data or have any other side effects. So, if you don't need the data moved back to a register, then adjusting the stack pointer with ADD is all you need to do. You get the stack pointer back where you want it, only without having to clobber a register with a POP ...


3

In the The Turing Test article; 2.9 Argument from Extra-Sensory Perception The strangest part of Turing's paper is the few paragraphs on ESP. Perhaps it is intended to be tongue-in-cheek, though, if it is, this fact is poorly signposted by Turing. Perhaps, instead, Turing was influenced by the apparently scientifically respectable results of ...


2

Make sure you're compiling in Debug mode and not Release mode. If you attempt to debug a program in Release mode, the data you get back from the debugger will be garbage due to optimizations.


2

I work for Aleri (opinions here are my own, though), so my view is a little skewed. Having said that... We're seeing a number of great use cases, ranging hugely in complexity and data volume. A few examples: Market data cleansing. We take stock quotes and "sanitise" them, flagging quotes that are out of expected market bounds Algo trading is the canonical ...


2

Where is FP from? What is it mnemonic for? If it's a mnemonic for "Frame Pointer" than *BP is more likely the register equivalent in the x86 family. If it's for the push-down stack then *SP is the equivalent in the x86 family.


2

The first thing on the called code's stack will be the return address for the call. The second thing will be the first argument. To avoid changing ESP, and to fix the "popping the wrong thing" problem, try something like "mov ecx,[esp+4]" (instead of the "pop ecx").


2

at present i am not using any event stream processing (ESP) / complex event processing (CEP) products, but am familiar with the concepts - we evaluated Streambase for a prior (military) project and I still get emails from them every now and then ;-) I looked into using esper for another real-time system (not a financial trading system, which seems to be the ...


2

A payload is the part of the packet with the actual info (the good stuff!) There are other parts of a packet, the packet headers, that describe the payload, like how big it is. The description is telling you that protection is provided for everything in the packet, including it's headers. Hope that helps!


2

Odd compiler. Very odd. add esp, 0FFFFFFF8h is exactly the same as sub esp, 8h except it sets the flag bits differently. It's fine, and yes it depends on unsigned integer wrap. Not a problem because assembly is inherently non-portable. If you wanna know why you'll have to ask Microsoft, and they probably don't know anymore.


1

I found the problem. It's quite an embarrassing mistake, but interesting to know that it leads to the observed effect, so I'll post it here in case someone else has the same problem. The client was doing HdResult = CoCreateInstance( sClassIdApp, NULL, CLSCTX_LOCAL_SERVER, IID_IUnknown, // Oops... (void**) &pInterface); ...


1

it should not be used as General Purpose Register. Feel free to use it as a stack pointer with appropriate care. E.g. you may reserve some memory for local vars on the stack with 'sub esp, ...' instruction, but you must restore its original value before the ret instruction



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