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137

Hofstadter's Law: Any computing project will take twice as long as you think it will — even when you take into account Hofstadter's Law.


69

The best answer you can give is to ask for time to knock up a quick prototype to allow you to give a more accurate estimate. Without some experience with a tool or a problem, any estimate you give is essentially meaningless. As an aside, there is very rarely a problem with giving too long an estimate. Unanticipated problems occur, priorities change, and ...


56

If you inflate your estimate based on past experiences to try and compensate for your inherent optimism, then you aren't inflating. You are trying to provide an accurate estimate. If however you inflate so that you will always have fluff time, that's not so good.


51

Oh yes, I've learnt to always multiply my initial estimation by two. That's why FogBUGZ's Evidence-Based Scheduling tool is so really useful.


42

I've tried many formal techniques, but what I always come back to is: Break the project down into a list of modules that you will actually have to write or modify. Look at the number of different screens, the number of reports, and any particularly complex logic that will have to be developed. Then guess how long it will take to write each of these ...


42

An exponential moving average is great for this. It provides a way to smooth your average so that each time you add a new sample the older samples become decreasingly important to the overall average. They are still considered, but their importance drops off exponentially--hence the name. And since it's a "moving" average, you only have to keep a single ...


40

Any organization that asks its programmers to estimate time for coarse-grained features is fundamentally broken. Steps to unbreak: Hire technical program managers. Developers can double as these folks if needed. Put any feature request, change request, or bug into a database immediately when it comes in. (My org uses Trac, which doesn't completely suck.) ...


35

The Scotty Rule: make your best guess round up to the nearest whole number double that quadruple that (thanks Adam!) increase to the next higher unit of measure Example: you think it will take 3.5 hours round that to 4 hours quadruple that to 16 hours shift it up to 16 days Ta-daa! You're a miracle worker when you get it done in less than 8 days.


34

Here's the fundamental question. When will the client think they're done? If they think they'll be done by June, then you put an Agile team in place. That's 4-6 people for 6 months. That's the budget. Essentially, you do the multiplication for them. team * rate * 6 months. If they think they'll be mostly done by June, but there will be more work ...


27

Steve McConnell (and others) talks about about the cone of uncertainty. Basically you provide an estimate that looks something like this: The work will take between 3 and 9 weeks with 4 weeks being the most likely. As the project progresses you can refine your estimate. As you do more of the work and understand the effort required better you can refine ...


26

I'll let you in on a secret. Even if you were an expert with that technology, your estimate is likely to be highly inaccurate. It is the nature of the beast when doing something that is an inherently R&D task. Unfortunately management often tries to apply a manufacturing model and demand accurate estimates. To illustrate my point, consider the difficulty ...


26

There's no other way to know how long something will take. You should be thankful, really, that your PM is even consulting you -- too many managers get together with the customer and promise impossible timelines, then expect the devs to live up to their outrageous promises.


24

Typically yes, but I have two strategies: Always provide estimates as a range (i.e. 1d-2d) rather than a single number. The difference between the numbers tells the project manager something about your confidence, and allows them to plan better. Use something like FogBugz' Evidence Based-Scheduling, or a personal spreadsheet, to compare your historical ...


23

Equal hash means equal file, unless someone malicious is messing around with your files and injecting collisions. (this could be the case if they are downloading stuff from the internet) If that is the case go for a SHA2 based function. There are no accidental MD5 collisions, 1,47x10-29 is a really really really small number. To overcome the issue of ...


22

It's not called "inflating" — it's called "making them remotely realistic."


21

A single person having done the estimates, rather than having used consensus based estimation (to fully understand the implied scope of requirements) such as Wideband Delphi. Especially true if the person doing the estimation is not the person doing the implementation!! - I once worked on a project estimated by someone else as 60 days before any ...


19

I'm a corporate developer, the kind Joel Spolsky called "depressed" in a couple of the StackOverflow podcasts. Because my company is not a software company it has little business reason to implement many of the measures software experts recommend companies engage for developer productivity. We don't get private offices and dual 30 inch monitors. Our source ...


18

Estimation Tasks The principles that I try to use (I don't always get the opportunity) are: Step-wise refinement 3 point estimates Risk analysis Step-wise refinement When estimating it's important to estimate at the right granularity and to continually break down and add tasks until you're confident in the estimates. Quite often, estimating highlights ...


17

Place finger in mouth, lick, wave in air and make up a number based on past experience. Then double it. Really, its just experience that counts. You imagine what the task entails you doing, and you know how long it'll take you to do that. Double it for unanticipated items. This is also why you never ask junior programmers for such estimates.


17

Take whatever estimate you think appropriate. Then double it.


17

No one has said it, so I will. The obvious answer is that if you have software schedule estimates then that is a sure sign of unrealistic figures. Yes, there are many methods for estimating software but none of them are accurate in any way, shape or form. What usually happens is that deadlines are set. If the task is over-estimated then extra time is ...


17

Don't forget you (an engineer) actually estimate in ideal hours (scrum term). While management work in real hours. The difference being that ideal hours are time without interuption (with a 30 minute warm up after each interuption). Ideal hours don't include time in meetings, time for lunch or normal chit chat etc. Take all these into consideration and ...


16

Don't show them the first 80% as soon as it is finished. Drip feed them.


15

Realistically, it probably averages out to 4 or 5 hours a day. Although its "lumpy" - there may be days where there could be 8 or 9 hours of it. Of all the software developers I know, the ones that write production code (as opposed to research) 4 to 5 seems to be the max of actual coding. There is a lot of other stuff that goes on. And to be honest there ...


15

The real question is not how to make accurate estimates in the spot, but how to make accurate estimates of your estimation ability on the spot. You never say, "It should be done in 104 man hours" You say, "Given what I understand of your requirements, it should take between 84 and 304 man hours. If you need a better estimate, then I can analyze your ...


15

Encryption should be third party most of the times, ...unless you're in the business of selling encryption systems. Which is pretty much Mr. Atwood his point as I understood it, your core busines shouldn't be third party, so there's probably nothing that should always be third party...


15

Break the problem up into as many sub-divided tasks as possible. Provide a per-item estimate in hours beside each one. When they think of a project as a whole, it seems simple. However, when they see each individual thing that must be done and the number of hours each item will require, it is putting it into terms business people can understand. ...


15

Kirk : Mr. Scott, have you always multiplied your repair estimates by a factor of four? Scotty : Certainly, sir. How else can I keep my reputation as a miracle worker?


15

Time estimation is hard. But the times when I've done this well all have a couple things in common: 1.) I received very good and complete requirements for the project. This is important and you should ask the tough questions to make sure that the requirements really are as complete as possible. 2.) I broke the project down into sections, wrote each ...



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