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10

VMware Server runs as an application on a normal OS Windows or Linux. ESXi installs it's own hypervisor as the base OS. If you're asking about this, then it's likely that you should start out with VMware Server.


9

If you're looking to connect to a ESX machine, without the heavy overhead of the vSphere client then you can use the VMware Remote Console. While this isn't formally documented, one of the developers has kindly posted some fairly detailed information on the VMware Forums. vmware-vmrc.exe command documentation Depending what version of the plugin or ...


7

I've done this before by using "File -> Export OVF Template" (make sure the VM is off). You can then deploy this on a new system with "File -> Deploy OVF Template". I highly recommend you test this before wiping out your old system, as there have been occasions where it hasn't quite worked properly. If you need to do this without turning the VM off, I think ...


6

You should be able to log in to Windows on the VM's console using the vSphere client, then close vSphere, and Windows will still believe the user is viewing the console. Simple as that. :) So there shouldn't be a need to involve remote desktop in the mix. As long as your tests then run as that logged-in Windows user, you should be fine. This technique ...


6

I've actually done this pretty recently, try this: Install VMware vSphere PowerCLI (it's a commandline scripting interface for ESX) Write a script (perhaps in Notepad) that contains the following code: Connect-VI Server <vCenter Server IP> Set-VM <VM name> -Snapshot <Snapshot name> -Confirm:$false This will connect to your vCenter ...


4

In the past I've set up scripts that revert VMs to specific snapshots via the SSH server on my ESXi host. Once sshd is enabled, you can remotely run vim-cmd over SSH. This was on ESXi 4.x, but I assume the same can be done in newer versions. The catch was that I had to enable the so-called "Tech Support Mode" to get sshd running, as documented in the VMware ...


4

With grep: grep . file With awk: awk 'NF' file However you can replace your command with a single call to awk: vm_ids=$(vim-cmd vmsvc/getallvms | awk '/^[0-9]+/{print $1}')


4

boot from a cd drive... be sure to "power on startup" the drive on your VM


3

Well, in your case ESXi is the better choice. There are cases where you want to use VMware Server but not really for this case. This is what ESXi is for. For instance, I use VMware Server on top of my development OS so I could do testing and use different distro's etc. I wouldn't do VMware Server for a production server like you are describing, but ESXi ...


3

The IC doesn't know if you've got those disks shared an in use by another ESXi host, it's very common to have a SAN on the backend and multiple hosts accessing the same storage device. In this case there's no way to know which hosts are accessing which machines, the scenario you describe only makes sense if you've got a single host - which is not the typical ...


3

I had the exact same problem, also on a KVM virtual client. The solution for me was to uncomment the following line: #ServerRoot "/etc/apache2" Hope this can help the next guy who starts wondering why he has to run "apache2ctl start" in the "/etc/apache2" directory in order to succeed ;)


3

Yes, you can do this. Copy all of the cloned VM's files from its directory, and place it on its destination datastore. In the VI client connected to the destination vCenter, go to the Inventory->Datastores view. Open the datastore browser for the datastore where you placed the VM's files. Find the .vmx file that you copied over and right-click it. Choose ...


3

I've figure it out the solution to my problem: Step 1: from within the vSphere client, while connected to vCenter1, select the VM and then from "File" menu select "Export"->"Export OVF Template" (Note: make sure the VM is Powered Off otherwise this feature is not available - it will be gray). This action will allow you to save on your machine/laptop the ...


3

Check the code below to get the VM names: #!/usr/bin/perl -w use strict; use VMware::VIRuntime; my %opts = ( datacenter => { type => "=s", help => "Enter the Dacenter Name", required => 1, }, ); ...


3

If you only need to transfer files from the host to the guest, the simplest solution is to create an ISO image and attach it to the virtual CD/DVD drive. For example, on Linux, the following command creates an ISO image foo.iso from the bar directory, preserving long file names (-J). genisoimage -o foo.iso -J bar If you need something more complex than ...


3

As per vmware documnetaion Reinstalling the ESXi host is the only supported way to reset a password on ESXi. Any other method may lead to a host failure or an unsupported configuration due to the complex nature of the ESXi architecture. Now if you can take the risk then check ESXi - Reset the password for root . This use a Slax Linux Live CD to ...


2

When you make a copy of an existing VM and keep both within the same network, you run into problems with identical/duplicate MAC addresses. So ESXi tries to detect that and asks you what you did. If you made a copy then a new MAC has to be generated to avoid conflicts. If you moved it then everything is fine and no changes are made. The detection seems to ...


2

Regarding the comments, i suggest to have a look here and check if you are in this case. If yes, i would suggest to use Windows7 instead of WinXP or use the VSphere Web Interface that should be at https://192.168.0.4:9443 Edit : i made a mistake, you cannot use the VSphere Web Interface. Only works against a VCenter server


2

You can use the VMware Web Services SDK and interact with your vSphere environment using SOAP. There is a WSDL available in the SDK, and you can use something like node-soap to work with it.


2

Using sed: sed '/^$/d' inputfile Since you're already piping the output to awk, a better approach would be to replace your command with: vm_ids=$(vim-cmd vmsvc/getallvms | awk 'NF && NR>1 {print $1}' | egrep "[0-9]+")


2

To improve CPU power efficiency, ESX/ESXi can take advantage of performance states (also known as P-states) to dynamically adjust CPU frequency to match the demand of running virtual machines. When a CPU runs at lower frequency, it can also run at lower voltage, which saves power. This type of power management is typically called Dynamic Voltage and ...


2

in vim, execute this command: :v/./d EDIT with grep: grep -o '^[0-9]\+' should work without worrying about empty lines. It gives all the leading numbers (ids). with your command: vm_ids=$(vim-cmd vmsvc/getallvms|grep -o '^[0-9]\+')


2

This code is a threading race waiting to happen. You probably got it from VMWare because you allocated only one processor to the virtual machine. What the code is missing is an interlock that ensures that thread B has seen the value of p change. So if thread A acquired a cpu core and keeps running for a while and thread B is blocked, waiting for a quantum ...


2

Short answer: Yes it will. It will create a local VMFS partition. You will be locked out of more advanced features that require shared storage: DRS, High Availability,Fault Tolerance, etc'. But those require vCenter and multiple ESX servers in any case.


2

The vSphere PowerCLI can do this for you from powershell. From here: Get-VM | ` ForEach-Object { $Report = "" | Select-Object -property Name,NumCpu,MemoryMB,Host,IPAddress $Report.Name = $_.Name $Report.NumCpu = $_.NumCpu $Report.MemoryMB = $_.MemoryMB $Report.Host = $_.Host $Report.IPAddress = $_.Guest.IPAddress Write-Output ...


2

if you have a lot of OSs on your machine and one of this is linux it means that you can read lilo or grub configs in order to list os's on this machine.


2

The only solution I have found is to run the server from a thumb drive and use the embedded hard drive to store your virtual servers. This solution worked for me. To achieve this in this way you will need: A USB thumb drive 1GB or larger An active Linux machine (or, use a liveCD option on your PowerEdge such as Knoppix or Gentoo LiveCD) Mount your ESXi ...


2

What is wrong with simply using your faviourite archiver/compressor utility?


2

from the VMware website, Server is a hosted application, ie it runs inside a host OS. ESX runs on the baremetal.


2

VMware's console access is indeed a closed protocol. However, they do have an embeddable web control called the Remote Console that implements this. It is an 'experimental' feature I believe, and won't be supported by them. But it's doable. So while the protocol isn't implemented by anyone else I know of, there is an option to wrap the control at least. ...



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