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7

"homer" and "root" are the same account. You can have multiple usernames for a single account. See also http://unix.stackexchange.com/questions/49993/another-account-with-same-uid-as-root-gets-prompted-to-set-new-password-for-root You'll want vipw and vipw -s to fix this. Editing directly with vim or sed is a bad idea. Consider http://serverfault.com/ ...


5

You could use the Win32::NetAdmin module. UserGetAttributes and GroupIsMember look like they do what you need.


3

You can store the users in an array from the who command and then while reading the /etc/passwd file, loop through the array to see if the user is present in the array and if so, print the entries from /etc/passwd file in the format you desire. Something like: #!/bin/bash while read -r user throw_away; do users+=( "$user" ) done < <(who) ...


2

You're trying to execute /etc/passwd and send the output to cut. You want to redirect the contents of the file: for user in `cut -f 1 -d : < $USERS`


2

easiest way: import pwd shells = set(p.pw_shell for p in pwd.getpwall()) print('\n'.join(shells))


2

This is because you are trying to create hardlink to /etc/passwd on a different volume. Most likely at your home system you setup everything onto a single volume.


2

/etc/passwd is a file. the home directory is usually at field/column 6, where ":" is the delimiter. When you are dealing with file structure that has distinct characters as delimiters, you should use a tool that can break your data down into smaller chunks for easier manipulation using fields and field delimiters. awk/cut etc, even using the shell with IFS ...


2

You can have this sed command: sed '/^[^:]\+:x:0:/{/^root:/!d}' /etc/passwd Or sed -i '/^[^:]\+:x:0:/{/^root:/!d}' /etc/passwd Which would modify the file.


1

It looks like the quantifier + is preventing C++ from getting your matches. I think it is redundant in your regex since you only have a unique number of "xuser"s in your string. This code works alright, gets to the cout line: string line( "xuser01:*:111000:201:User Name, School Info, Year:/homes/pc/xu/xuser01:/bin/ksh" ); regex ...


1

#!/usr/bin/perl #always use strict. use warnings use strict; use warnings; use autodie; my $filename = '/etc/passwd'; #use lexical file handle, don't need to explicitly close #3 argument form of open. `use autodie;` takes care of error checking. open my $fh, '<', $filename; #users will hold key value pairs. Key = lastname, Values: arrayref of ...


1

There are, of course, many ways to do this. echo "Username UserID Full Name" while read name therest; do g=$(grep "$name" /etc/passwd) [[ "$g" =~ ([^:]+):[^:]+:([^:]+):[^:]+:([^:]+) ]] printf "%-12s %6d %s\n" \ "${BASH_REMATCH[1]}" \ "${BASH_REMATCH[2]}" \ "${BASH_REMATCH[3]}" done < <(who)


1

I'm not sure what output you expect nor if my code does what you want, but the following code first looks for usernames that appear in (part of) someone's full name. It then shows what usernames appear in a certain full name. I know it's an ugly code and probably not the most efficient solution, but let me know if this is the output you expected or not. ...


1

I think the tools you want are grep, tr and awk. Grep will give you lines from the file that actually contain home directories. tr will let you break up the delimiter into spaces, which makes each line easier to parse. Awk is just one program that would help you display the results that you want. Good luck :) Another hint, try ls --color=auto /etc, passwd ...


1

You don't need to use lckpwdf() unless you are planing on making changes to the shadow file. lckpwdf() created an exclusive lock on the file, which causes any process trying to access the file wait until the lock is released. For reading the shadow file, this is highly unnecessary. If you are modifying the file, call lckpwdf() once before your ...



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