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6

The code is not safe in the slightest. It's relatively easy to get access to the builtins module just by accessing attributes of literals. eg. result = eval("""[klass for klass in ''.__class__.__base__.__subclasses__() if klass.__name__ == "BuiltinImporter"][0].load_module("builtins")""", {"__builtins__":None},{}) assert result is ...


5

typeof Module might be undefined if Module is a local variable that happens to contain undefined. This code is meant to support a few cases, Module might be local or global, and defined or undefined. We want to avoid polluting the global scope, so we don't just do Module = ... if it's undefined. First, the usual case is emscripten-generated code in the ...


4

Catch the error: try { eval(exp); } catch (e) { if (e instanceof SyntaxError) { alert(e.message); } }


4

def move(self,type): photos = ['example1'] movies = ['example2'] for file in locals()[type]: ... move("photos") much better would be to keep a list of lists my_lists = { "movies":... "photos":... } variable="movies" do_something(my_lists[variable])


4

Just use the functions (with functools.partial or lambda when you need to pre-bind arguments) rather than their names. E.g: ['delim',0,4,str.strip], ['qual',4,5,None], ['NLS_CODE',6,25,str.strip], ['source_system_id',26,45,str.strip], ['extract_name',46,65,str.strip], ['extract_serial_number',66,85,str.strip], ['file_counter',86,88, lambda s: ...


4

There are a bunch of ways. The most straightforward, given what you have at the moment, is probably to use getattr: header_fields = [ ['delim',0,4,'strip'], ['qual',4,5,None], ['NLS_CODE',6,25,'strip'], ['source_system_id',26,45,'strip'], ['extract_name',46,65,'strip'], ['extract_serial_number',66,85,'strip'], ['file_counter',86,88,'lstrip', ('0',)], ...


3

There is a function like that in Ouzo Goodies: Arrays::removeNestedKey($_SESSION, ['one', 'two', 'three']); If you don't want to include the lib, you can take a look at the source code and grab the function itself: public static function removeNestedKey(array &$array, array $keys) { $key = array_shift($keys); if (count($keys) == 0) { ...


3

As @rawing said in the comments, you'll need to decode the bytes into a string. You'll also probably want to use ast.literal_eval over eval, as the latter executes arbitrary code, and is unsafe. Here's an example where I've uploaded a dict of literals as a Github gist: import urllib.request import ast url = ...


3

According to the documentation of eval, eval(expression, globals=None, locals=None) The expression argument is parsed and evaluated as a Python expression using the globals and locals dictionaries as global and local namespace. If the globals dictionary is present and lacks '__builtins__', the current globals are copied into globals before expression ...


3

You don't need eval, you just need an integer literal beginning with 0 and where no digits are greater than 7 for JS to see that you're expressing an octal literal value. For example: console.log(011) // 9 Similarly for hexadecimal: console.log(0xcd) // 205 See also the Integers section on MDN.


2

Here is a solution using tapply: with(sales, tapply(itemsSold, substr(Dates, 1, 7), sum)) Produces monthly sums (I limited my data to 9 months for illustrative purposes, but this extends to longer periods): 2011-01 2011-02 2011-03 2011-04 2011-05 2011-06 2011-07 2011-08 2011-09 1592.097 1468.427 1594.386 1563.014 1595.489 1560.361 1553.128 ...


2

As said earlier, there is a potential risk involved while using eval(), If you want to evaluate string as expression you can use ${} to evalute expression, introduced in ECMA-6


2

This sounds like a bad design. It's almost never necessary to use eval(parse()). To get a variable, get() is somewhat safer, like get(bar.name)[rab]. But you're still running into an environment issue here. Since you don't have the variables bar or rab in the body of the dopar, they are not exported to the environment where foreach is running the code. You ...


2

First, the issues I have with your code: eval is very, very rarely needed, and extremely dangerous, use with caution. I've been developing in PHP for over 10 years, and never really encountered a situation that needed eval. This is no exception. Eval is not required You're sanitizing the entire $_POST array. That's great, but there are special functions ...


2

Another approach would be to re-write the current usage of accessing object properties via the dot notation and use the bracket notation instead. launch_no_eval:function(id) { //we init a blank dhtmlxwindow and do some other things here, then... if (id==="window_a") var x = wins.a({x:1}); //fill dhtmlxwindow with proper content else ...


1

Try using list comprehensions. That way you won't have to load the list.append function into memory and it can boost your script, for not having to do a lot of appends, so check this article for a comparison. The code using list comprehensions can be written this way: def FindOccurences(data, condition, left, right): func = eval( u"lambda data, i : " + ...


1

I'd recommmend to use the Function constructor instead of eval (though you could do the same with an evaled IEFE). That way, you get a "module" scope for free don't collide with the scopes of the loader function can pass arguments with arbitrary names (new Function("exports", ressourceCode))(ressourceObject);


1

Besides trivial abc[,'emp'] <- 0, you can do: eval(parse(text=sprintf('%s$%s <- 0','abc',b))) abc # emp #1 0 #2 0 #3 0


1

Since you are using SymPy, why not take the derivative of the expression symbolically? >>> import sympy >>> x = sympy.symbols('x') >>> f = x**2 >>> d = sympy.diff(f, x) >>> d 2*x To evaluate these as functions on numpy arrays, use lambdify >>> import numpy as np >>> dfunc = sympy.lambdify(x, ...


1

What you are doing is workable, you just need to adjust the conditions slightly. You're currently saying "if the user's answer is a+b, then its right" - even if the question was "what is a times b". So, you need to also check that the operation matches. You could do something like this: if answer == ran+dom and op == 'plus': # correct And similarly ...


1

The proper way to run untrusted JavaScript is to put it into a sandboxed environment. Here is the technique used by a Jailed library written by myself for exactly the mentioned purpose: For Node.js: Create a subprocess; Load the code as a string (read the file contents in case you have its path); Add use strict; at the beginning of the code (in order to ...


1

You need to write it thus: joypad.set({ [ow[n][4]] = true }) Note the brackets around "ow[n][4]". ...and you may omit the parentheses: joypad.set{ [ow[n][4]] = true } The rule is this: if a table key isn't a lexical identifier or string, you need to put it inside brackets.


1

Using jme's example and if it is valid json which I think it may well be you can just use requests and use .json: import requests r = requests.get("https://gist.githubusercontent.com/eldridgejm/76c78b7d11a66162687b/raw/60a76770970715f859d1e3d33c8e2afcac296a31/gistfile1.txt") print(r.json()) {u'baz': u'apple', u'foo': 41, u'bar': 42}


1

This will achieve what you want: function delete(){ $keys = func_get_args(); $ref = &$_SESSION; for($x = 0; $x < sizeOf($keys)-1; $x++) { $ref = &$ref[$keys[$x]]; } unset($ref[$keys[sizeOf($keys)-1]]); unset($ref); }


1

Let's find out! class A def self.scope yield end def self.method_added method puts "In method_added, method = #{method}, self = #{self}" instance_eval 'puts "In instance_eval, method = #{method}, self = #{self}"' end end class B < A scope do puts "In scope's block, self = #{self}" def foo end end end # In scope's ...


1

Your scope method is basically a no-op. When you pass a block to a method that yields, the block is evaluated in the current scope. Observe: class A def self.scope yield end end A.scope { p self } # main Since nothing is yielded to the block, and nothing is done with the return value of yield, any code run in the block will have the same effect ...


1

It's octal, base 8. The 4 is the "8's" place, not the "10's" place. 4 * 8 = 32 + 7 = 39.


1

Here's a data.table approach that aggregates by year and month, using the first of the month as the respective group label: library(data.table) ## mDt <- Dt[ ,list(monthSold=sum(itemsSold)), keyby=list(mDay=as.Date(paste0( year(Dates),"-",month(Dates),"-01")))] ## R> head(mDt) mDay monthSold 1: 2012-01-01 179 2: 2012-02-01 ...



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