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0

Something like this? If y is missing from the argument list, the functions looks for it in the global environment, and if found calculates x + y, Otherwise, it accepts the given y argument and uses that in the calculation. > y <- 5 > test <- function(x, y) { if(missing(y)) y <- get("y", .GlobalEnv) x + y } > test(1) ...


1

I think the safest way would be to define a default value of y from the parent frame if not supplied. test<-function(x,y=get("y", envir=parent.frame(1))) { x+y } y<-3 test(1) # [1] 4 test(1, 10) # [1] 11 but really this sounds like a terrible idea.


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eval_with <- function(fn, ..., stuff = parent.frame()) { args <- list(...) for (arg in setdiff(intersect(ls(stuff), names(formals(fn))), names(args))) args[[arg]] <- stuff[[arg]] do.call(fn, args) } Examples local({ print(eval_with(test, 1, stuff = list(y = 3))) # 4 y <- 2 print(eval_with(test, 1)) # 3 print(eval_with(test, ...


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Setting suhosin.executor.disable_eval=On will disable eval() entirely. E.g. eval('anything();') will be blocked. Setting suhosin.executor.eval.blacklist will block only specified functions. E.g. suhosin.executor.eval.blacklist = base64_decode will prevent eval from executing base64_decode. eval('base64_decode("...");'); Note: Some common PHP code ...


1

The created function isn't in the correct scope. So your onclick can't 'see' it. Use window.addFeatureToTable = function() { // definition } to force it in the window-scope. Working JsFiddle To answer your question in the comment: What you actualy have is something like this code: function a() { function b(where) { alert('b can be ...


0

You should simply use assign in that case and not eval this way: {assign var=value value= $smarty.get[$feature.name]} and then use $value in option. You could also not create this variable at all and instead of : <option value="'{$option.value}'">{$option.value} {$value}</option> you could use: <option ...


3

What you are doing is very risky. Code can be injected from an input source (the jpeg). !!! Don't use eval() here. !!! You'll need to write a little parser which evaluates the expression: // Typical value of fnumber (I obtained from a test JPEG using exif_read_data()) $fnumber = '35/10'; // Split by `/` $operands = explode('/', $fnumber); // Divide ...


2

No. Call stack would be changed (error messages, magic constant __FILE__). Relative includes in evaled code could be broken. Two new variables $codeToModify, $codeToEval would appear in evaled code scope. Evaled code would not be cached. Parse error inside evaled code does not interrupt whole script. Eval could be disabled with Suhosin.


0

Set suhosin.executor.disable_eval to Off. If it is set to On like in you example, eval() will get disabled completely (and this is what you are seeing in logs). Btw, I don't think that there is a legit way of using eval() in PHP applications. Applications which are really using it should be avoided. I would turn it off completely unless something ...


1

You can pass in a file object (writer) to the Interpreter() class: output = StringIO() aeval = Interpreter(writer=output) writer defaults to sys.stdout if you don't specify it, and set when Interpreter() is instantiated. This is why replacing sys.stdout doesn't work; the instance already has their own reference to it. Demo: >>> from cStringIO ...


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sh -c summons a new shell while eval executes it on the current shell. Any changes in the environment inside the new shell does not affect the shell that called it.


2

xargs can only run an external executable -- something which the operating system's execv() family of calls can execute. (Keep in mind that xargs itself is not part of your shell but an external program, and thus it has no access to the shell that started it). The shell builtin eval is not an executable. Thus, xargs cannot run it. (By its nature, it invokes ...


4

You don't really need eval or sh -c or ls parsing. Just use stat: stat -c "%n %y %s" *


0

I had my DataSource config nested wrong. I needed it to look like this: transport: { read: { url:"odata/RecipeOData", dataType: "json" }


1

I think that the problem is caused when there are ' and " in one string when a string argument is inside eval which is a string argument inside another eval. the solution is to declare a function to addshalshes just like the one on php. when you try for example console.log("hey you !"); it works fine, when you add eval eval('console.log("hey you!");'); ...


1

Use the following syntax: for(int i=1; i<=x1.asInteger(); i++){ for(int j=1; j<=x2.asInteger(); j++){ REXP cls1 = instance.eval("c1 <- h["+i+","+j+"]"); System.out.println(cls1.asString()); } } No need of converting the data type to character. Hope it helps.


2

9** is not valid javascript, hence the error. You could then try: try { eval(div.innerHTML); } catch(e) { // handle error here } However, as @DaveChen pointed out, always remember that eval is evil.


2

Functions always resolve names in the environment they were defined in, not the environment they were called in. When you insert foo into the eval call's globals, it still looks in its original environment's globals for x rather than the new environment. This is the same mechanism that lets you do from some_file import foo foo() and have foo use ...


4

This appears to be a bug. Whether it's a bug in the documentation or the implementation, I don't know, but eval does not copy the current globals into globals if __builtins__ is not present. Rather, it only copies __builtins__: if (PyDict_GetItemString(globals, "__builtins__") == NULL) { if (PyDict_SetItemString(globals, "__builtins__", ...


1

This is because the assign operations are happening in the worker processes. The vaues of the variables are being sent back (see your R session console) but not with the names you assigned. You need to capture these values and assign them names again. See this related question. The following is an alternative that may be of help: asign the output of foreach ...


1

If I simply add this to my HTML in script tags, will the page effectively execute the google analytics javascript, even though it's in unicode? First, your example is not “in Unicode”, it’s just using JavaScript character escape sequences. The ones you used are supported in string literals and regular expression literals. To test if the page executes ...


1

@ECHO OFF SETLOCAL ENABLEDELAYEDEXPANSION :SOA SET "confile=q24928414.txt" SET "setvar=%temp%\%~n0_setvar.bat" SET "varlist=" FOR /F "usebackq tokens=1*delims=:=" %%a in ("%confile%") do ( CALL SET "%%a=%%b" ECHO %%a = !%%a! ) :EOA GOTO :EOF I replaced your input file with q24928414.txt to suit my system. Works for me! -- edited following MC ND's ...


0

I really do not understand the problem. Inside the g()-function you asked for the items in the local environment and got "b" output to the console as a side effect of print(). It didn't need to look in 'e1' since its local environment was even "closer". Then you got "b" as the value returned from print and it was printed as part of the implicit REPL. Again ...


0

Extending off of Larry's. I made it recursively search the entire block and children nodes. The script now will also call external scripts that are specified with src parameter. Scripts are appended to the head instead of inserted and placed in the order they are found. So specifically order scripts are preserved. And each script is executed synchronously ...


1

Posting comment as answer per request: You can store a subroutine ref like this: perl -lwe 'my $x = eval(q( sub { my $foo = shift; $foo*2; } )); print $x->(12);' This prints 24. You can re-use the code without the need to recompile it.


2

You have a ast.expr subclass, not a ast.Expression top-level node. compile() can only take a mod object, so one of Module, Interactive or Expression, depending on the third argument to compile(). For 'eval', use ast.Expression(). You can create one containing the ast.Compare node: expr = ast.Expression(cond) because the abstract grammar defines it as: ...


2

Here's another way that will work for prefix calls, but not for infix calls, such as %in%. is.prefix.call <- function(text) { d <- getParseData(parse(text=text)) with(d, token[id == 1] == 'SYMBOL_FUNCTION_CALL') } is.prefix.call("boo(x)") # TRUE is.prefix.call("boo") # FALSE is.prefix.call("boo(baz(Y))") # TRUE


1

This is far from perfect but it is short and maybe its good enough: isFunCall <- function(x) grepl("[()]", x) & grepl("^[()[:alnum:]_.]+$", x) isFunCall("a(b)") ## [1] TRUE isFunCall("a(b(c))") ## [1] TRUE isFunCall("d") ## [1] FALSE


1

You can create a method to evaluate the value and return the value you want. <%# IsLinkableABool( Eval("IsLinkable") ) %> On the code behind you can create the method as follow protected String IsLinkableABool(String isLinkable) { if (isLinkable == Boolean.TrueString) { return "monkeys!!!!!! (please be aware..."; } else ...


0

It's been a long time since I'd had to use WebForms, but I imagine you were closest here: <%#(String.IsNullOrEmpty(Eval("Company").ToString()) ? "@ Eval("Company")" : Eval("Company") )%> However, note that your call to Eval("Company") in the first result of the condition is inside a string. This has two problems. First, code which is inside of a ...


0

I'd actually follow @jonrsharpe's comment, but if you really need to have them in one instance, you can use getattr and setattr builtins: game_name = "game1" question1_na_line = "{}_question1_not_answered" player1_sc_line = "{}_player1_score" question1_na = question1_na_line.format(game_name) player1_sc = ...


0

The usual way to access attributes by name is the getattr(obj, name) function. Now given the more specific problem you describe I think you'd be better using a dict (or dict of dicts etc) to store your games states (scores etc).


2

You should use a dict instead. That will allow you to create dynamically-named variables, as it were, to store that information. self.game_dict = {} self.game_dict[game_name + 'question1_not_answered'] = True Then you can modify it as above, and access it in a couple ways: >>> game_obj.game_dict.get(game_name + 'question1_not_answered') True ...


1

In this form Eval accepts name of the column you need to retrieve and, optionally, the format of the resulting string. If you need to get two fields out of current data item - you need two Eval calls for this. However in your case one column Picture seems to suffice: ImageUrl='<%# string.Format("http://abc.storage/{0}", Eval("Picture")) %>'


0

$checkResult = exec('echo \'<?php ' . $code_to_check . '\' | php -l >/dev/null 2>&1; echo $?'); if ($checkResult != 0) { throw new \RuntimeException("Invalid php"); } else { $result = eval($code_to_check); }


1

Because with eval your command becomes like this: echo "a b c" | cut -f 3 -d' ' But with word splitting only, your command is only like this: echo "\"a" "b" "c\"" | cut "-f" "3" "-d'" "'" Variables don't get double-parsed i.e. it only gets word-split once and quotes inside it is just ignored.


0

I suggest to you when you assign a value to a variable, you should put it as a global variable like this; $GLOBALS['My_Vars']['VarName'] = $Value; when you retrevie the name of the variable from your code which is in your example $user, you change {{ $user }} to the value within $GLOBALS['My_Vars']['user'] in this case you don't need to use evel


2

Eval is unnecessary here. You can get and set global variables as properties of the window object. $.getUniqueString = function (prefix) { if (!prefix) prefix = "s"; for (var loopIndex = 0; true; loopIndex++) { if (typeof window[prefix + loopIndex] != "undefined") { // if sourceId exists continue; } prefix = ...


2

You don't need to use literal_eval() or eval() at all. Use getattr() to get the set operation method by string: >>> list1 = [1,2,3,2,4] >>> list2 = [2,4,5,4] >>> str_set_operation = "intersection" >>> set1 = set(list1) >>> set2 = set(list2) >>> getattr(set1, str_set_operation)(set2) set([2, 4]) ...


0

I'd suspect that the line DataRowView rowView = e.Item.DataItem as DataRowView; is the problem here. Set a breakpoint on that line and investigate what type you are getting there. Where type conversion is done using the as keyword, a failure to carry out the conversion will return null rather than an exception, so the subsequent call to the ["Total"] ...


0

Found it, onclick='<%#String.Format("setIFrameSrc(\"{0}\")", Eval("CCM_Name").ToString()) %>' The above code i have written is also correct,but it will give error when we pass string as eval value.


0

Use the right combination of single and double quotes. Change onclick='<%#"setIFrameSrc("+DataBinder.Eval(Container.DataItem, "CCM_Name")+")"%>' To onclick='<%#setIFrameSrc(DataBinder.Eval(Container.DataItem, "CCM_Name"))%>'


0

The problem is that eval does not see context. Your 'Something resolves in something.core and something.core-test since you have refered all. It won't resolve from whatever namespace where lein test runs its tests. To fix the immediate problem change 'Something to `Something so that it is namespace-qualified. The test will then run (and fail), but ...


0

In python, a mapping (or associative array in PHP) is called a Dictionary (or dict for short). One thing to note, is that the order of iteration over a python dictionary is not guaranteed. In python you can loop over a dictionary in a variety of ways. The most simple is to iterate over the dictionary's keys for k in D: #k is the key, D[k] is the value ...


2

Try this >>> a = {'3ec': ('2', 0.00390625, 1405595202.852576), '3ed': ('2', 0.0078125, 1405595227.65275), '3f2': ('3', 0.0078125, 1405595247.855199), '3eb': ('2', 0.00390625, 1405595202.852538), '3f1': ('3', 0.00390625, 1405595247.855164)} >>> min_val = min([x[2] for x in a.values()]) >>> max_val = max([x[2] for x in a.values()]) ...


0

You can simulate PHP's foreach with for in python, i.e. for key, value in Interfaces.log_manager.job_log[user_id].iteritems(): and the data between the braces is just an array, so you can refer to the elements as value[0], value[1], etc, in the aforementioned example.


2

First of all your data structure is dict in python, so you should ; for k,v in l.iteritems(): print k,v The output; 3ec ('2', 0.00390625, 1405595202.852576) 3ed ('2', 0.0078125, 1405595227.65275) 3f2 ('3', 0.0078125, 1405595247.855199) 3eb ('2', 0.00390625, 1405595202.852538) 3f1 ('3', 0.00390625, 1405595247.855164)


0

Your code works. Perhaps the selector #Gridinvoice is wrong. EDIT: Here is your code, updated to use the JSON data: $.each(data.Dpurchaseinvoice, function (key, item) { $("#Gridinvoice").append('<tr><td class="auto-style36" style="border-style: solid; border-width: thin">' + item.pInvoiceDate + '</td><td class="auto-style36" ...


0

the code it's ok but when you use "loop_channel_name" take the last element of array. You must pass the actual element (this): document.getElementById('channel_button_'+loop_channel_name).onmouseover = function(){ alert('Rollover '+this.id); } Example


0

loop_channel_name is initialized as a global variable because you didn't use the var keyword. Try var loop_channel_name instead of just loop_channel_name. When you initialize loop_channel_name on the first iteration of the for loop you are creating it as a global variable and on subsequent iterations you are just updating that instead of creating a new ...



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