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141

Case 1 (direct): $("div#target span.green").on("click", function() {...}); == Hey! I want every span.green inside div#target to listen up: when you get clicked on, do X. Case 2 (delegated): $("div#target").on("click", "span.green", function() {...}); == Hey, div#target! When any of your child elements which are "span.green" get clicked, do X with ...


111

if i understand you want to hide a div when you click anywhere but the div, and if you do click while over the div, then it should NOT close. you can do this: $(document).click(function() { alert("me"); }); $(".myDiv").click(function(e) { e.stopPropagation(); // This is the preferred method. return false; // This should not be used unless ...


59

I am adding this answer for completeness because the accepted answer by @amustill does not correctly solve the problem in Internet Explorer. Please see the comments in my original post for details. In addition, this solution does not require any plugins - only jQuery. In essence, the code works by handling the mousewheel event. Each such event contains a ...


31

It's possible with the use of Brandon Aaron's Mousewheel plugin. Here's a demo: http://jsbin.com/ixura3/3


30

Events only bubble up. So the click event handler for the a element is fired before the click event handler for the div. If you want the behaviour you describe, the you need to add a click event handler to the a element which stops propagation to the div. $("#myDiv a").click( function(event) { event.stopPropagation(); } ); and keep whatever event ...


25

Its fairly simple Lets suppose you do something like document.ontouchmove = function(e){ e.preventDefault(); } now to revert it to the original situation, do the below... document.ontouchmove = function(e){ return true; } via - http://www.bcreatives.com.au/blog/enabledisable-scrolling-in-iphoneipads-safari-browser.html


24

It doesn't remember the value at all. The event e is new each time onclick is fired. The problem is you're always cancelling the event bubbling: if(foo) { e.stopPropagation(); } else { e.cancelBubble = true; } e.stopPropagation is the W3C method of preventing event bubbling. e.cancelBubble is the Microsoft method to prevent event bubbling. ...


21

The concept of "bubbling up" is like if you have a child element with a click event and you don't want it to trigger the click event of the parent. You could use event.stopPropagation(). event.stopPropagation() basically says only apply this click event to THIS CHILD NODE and don't tell the parent containers anything because I don't want them to react. ...


20

Empirically: It depends on what browser you're using; IE cancels the event, everything else (as far as I can tell) continues it. See the test pages and discussion below. Theoretically: Andy E's head helpfully found that DOM2 says the event should continue because bubbling should be based on the initial state of the tree. So the behavior of the majority is ...


20

You need to capture the preview mouse wheel event in the inner listview ctl.PreviewMouseWheel += PreviewMouseWheel; then stop the event from scrolling the listview and raise the event in the parent listview. private static void PreviewMouseWheel(object sender, MouseWheelEventArgs e) { if (!e.Handled) { e.Handled = true; var ...


19

According to jQuery's documentation: $('myclass').bind('amodaldestroy'), function(event) { ....does something.... event.stopPropagation(); });


18

I don't have the docs right in front of me, but I think if you mark the MouseButtonEventArgs object as Handled it stops the event from going up the chain. Should be as simple as e.Handled = true; Please somebody correct me if I am wrong about this.


18

Information found at this article - Introduction to event handling in ActionScript 3.0 is more demonstrative and easy to understand. It will enhance the above accepted answer by @Jason Sturges. Event bubbling and event capturing are two faces of events. If you make the event.bubbles to false that means the event is marked as non-bubbling event. bubbles: ...


16

The problematic bit of your code is this: $("div.boxContent") /* miss the each function */ .click(function() { $(this).find("div.btn a").trigger('click'); }); This says "every time any click event is received on this element, trigger a click on the descendant element". However, event bubbling means that the event triggered in this function is then ...


16

In my case: $('#some_link').click(function(event){ event.preventDefault(); }); $('#some_link').unbind('click'); worked as the only method to restore the default action. As seen over here: http://stackoverflow.com/a/1673570/211514


13

The mouseover and mouseout events are also fired when the mouse enters and leaves any child elements. Try using the mouseenter and mouseleave events instead. Unfortunately, the live method doesn't currently support these methods. You'll have to bind them manually when you add/remove links. function toggleDelete() { ...


13

Try this $('.myDiv').click(function(e) { //button click class name is myDiv e.stopPropagation(); }) $(function(){ $(document).click(function(){ $('.myDiv').hide(); //hide the button }); }); I use class name instead of ID, because in asp.net you have to worry about the extra stuff .net attaches to the id EDIT- Since you added a another ...


13

Event bubbling is the idea of information moving up through a deep structure, when proper design dictates that normally information should only flow downward. In very basic terms, think of a single object. Properly designed, this object should only know about its own child objects. It should have no direct interaction with its parent. Its children and ...


13

The Bubble handlers are not actual binding handlers and are used as options in the event binding (click binding calls event binding). So, they do not run on their own. So, you can add a "bogus" no-op handler and use clickBubble or you could certainly choose to create a custom binding to do this for you. Maybe something like: ...


11

Try $("a").click(function(event){ event.stopPropagation(); }); The click function is passed an 'event' object. By calling the 'stopPropagation' method of the event object, you can prevent bubbling.


11

I know it's quite an old question, but since this is one of top results in google... I had to somehow cancel scroll bubbling without jQuery and this code works for me: function preventDefault(e) { e = e || window.event; if (e.preventDefault) e.preventDefault(); e.returnValue = false; } document.getElementById('a').onmousewheel = function(e) { ...


10

Setting bubbles to false means the event does not bubble up the display list at all. stopPropagation and stopImmediatePropagation make the current event listener the last to process an event. The difference between stopPropagation and stopImmediatePropagation is that stopImmediatePropagation will not only prevent the event from moving to the next node, but ...


9

Try using .mouseenter() and .mouseleave() instead. They handle event bubbling differently from .mouseover() and .mouseout(). I think it should solve your problem: $("document").ready(function() { $('.tooltip').mouseenter(function(e){ var id = $(this).siblings('.tooltip-c').attr('id'); $('.tp'+id).fadeIn(500); $('.tp'+id ...


8

It's called event delegation. You're using jQuery which makes it trivial to find the triggering <tr> element of the event, via closest: $('#myTable').mouseover(function(event) { var tr = $(event.target).closest('tr'); // do something with the <tr> element... }) closest was in fact written to support event delegation like this. It's ...


8

Use the mouseleave event instead or mouseout for this, it handles your specific issue. See here for details From the docs on the difference: The mouseleave event differs from mouseout in the way it handles event bubbling. If mouseout were used in this example, then when the mouse pointer moved out of the Inner element, the handler would be triggered. ...


8

The general idea: Upon the first click, dont call the associated function (say single_click_function()). Rather, set a timer for a certain period of time(say x). If we do not get another click during that time span, go for the single_click_function(). If we do get one, call double_click_function() Timer will be cleared once the second click is received. It ...


8

Check out delegate() — it's exactly what you're asking for. $('ul.mylist').delegate('a', 'click', function() { // ... your code ... }); You get all the benefits of a jQuery handler, without having to do the binding to all those elements.


8

quirksmode simplified the model a little. Events in fact go through up to three phases: capturing, at target, and bubbling. If you log the event.eventPhase like this: document.getElementById('out').addEventListener('click', function(e){ console.log(e.eventPhase + " : " + e.target.id + " : bubbling"); }, false); ... you'll see that the 'bubble in' and ...


6

To use custom events for bubbling the events of another control, you can do like this: Public Custom Event AddRemoveAttendees As EventHandler AddHandler(ByVal value As EventHandler) AddHandler _theButton.Click, value End AddHandler RemoveHandler(ByVal value As EventHandler) RemoveHandler _theButton.Click, value End ...



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